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Arthur Jr Levitt

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BUSINESS
March 26, 2004 | From Reuters
The California state employees' pension fund nominated former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt to the New York Stock Exchange board as the NYSE began allowing investors to suggest director candidates. The Big Board said Thursday that it had accepted about 100 applications for its eight director positions. The deadline for nominations was Wednesday. The California Public Employees' Retirement System nominated Levitt.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 2004 | From Reuters
The California state employees' pension fund nominated former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt to the New York Stock Exchange board as the NYSE began allowing investors to suggest director candidates. The Big Board said Thursday that it had accepted about 100 applications for its eight director positions. The deadline for nominations was Wednesday. The California Public Employees' Retirement System nominated Levitt.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 1999 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Would you buy a "buy" recommendation from these people? America's chief stock market regulator said Tuesday that Wall Street analysts are issuing far too many bullish stock reports, a trend intensifying the long-standing debate over the objectivity of analysts.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Arthur Levitt couldn't muster much support for a proposal to make accounting firms more independent by limiting their ability to sell consulting services to their audit clients. Amid strong opposition from the accounting industry, corporations and members of Congress, the then-chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission backed down.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1999 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The explosion of aggressive stock trading by individual investors is keeping Arthur Levitt and his team at the Securities and Exchange Commission busy these days. In recent speeches, the SEC chairman has expressed concern that many investors are so fascinated with researching and trading stocks over the Internet that they're overlooking the risks involved.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2000 | Associated Press
SEC Chairman Arthur Levitt, approaching the end of his long tenure, is pushing mutual fund directors to reduce commissions that funds pay to brokerages, much of which are being passed on to investors. Levitt also is threatening action if companies continue to give stock options to executives without shareholders' approval.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt took the chairman of the House Commerce Committee to task for pressing for delays in major rule changes for the Nasdaq Stock Market, according to a letter released Monday. The pressure from Rep. Thomas J. Bliley Jr. (R-Va.) threatened to interfere with a recently concluded SEC investigation of the Nasdaq market, Levitt complained in his July 30 letter to Bliley.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Levitt Concerned About Derivatives: Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt expressed concern about the use of derivative securities by individual investors and state and local pension funds. Levitt called for greater oversight and said securities firms should provide better information to investors before selling derivatives, securities that are tied to the value of bonds, stocks and other assets.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Arthur Levitt Jr. said Thursday that he was resigning as chairman of the American Stock Exchange after 11 years at the nation's third-largest stock market, which has attempted to stem the loss of business to its bigger Wall Street peers by expanding into innovative securities. Levitt, 58, said he would remain at the exchange until a successor is named, and that a search committee had been formed. He said he plans to build his 3-year-old Levitt Communications Inc. into a larger publishing company.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt on Thursday criticized corporations for their disclosure of financial forecasts in a way that favors Wall Street analysts and leaves investors with boilerplate. Levitt said a year-old law that seeks to encourage companies to publicize their expectations is not working because many corporate disclosures are "over-lawyered."
BUSINESS
July 26, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Arthur Levitt Jr. the longest-serving chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, is rejoining the board of M&T Bank Corp. (ticker symbol: MTB) in Buffalo, N.Y., as a director. Levitt, 70, served as director of the bank from 1987 until 1993, when he was appointed to the SEC by President Clinton. Levitt left the SEC in February.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | Reuters
Arthur Levitt, former chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, signed a deal to write a book detailing the financial world for the individual investor, Knopf Publishing Group said Wednesday. "This book will be a distillation of everything I learned during my eight years at the Securities and Exchange Commission and in my three decades on Wall Street," Levitt said in a statement. Terms were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Arthur Levitt is trying to rally public support for a plan to give shareholders a say in how their companies dole out stock option grants--the lucrative deals that can provide a windfall for corporate insiders at what some critics say is the expense of stockholders. This isn't a new issue for Levitt, the outgoing chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission and a leading advocate for investor rights.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2000 | Associated Press
SEC Chairman Arthur Levitt, approaching the end of his long tenure, is pushing mutual fund directors to reduce commissions that funds pay to brokerages, much of which are being passed on to investors. Levitt also is threatening action if companies continue to give stock options to executives without shareholders' approval.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | WALTER HAMILTON
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt is expected to criticize the day-trading industry at a Senate hearing today, saying recently completed investigations of some firms show "lax compliance" with securities laws that raise "serious concerns." The SEC has recently finished 40 examinations of day-trading firms to determine whether they skirt rules governing, among other things, "short" selling of stocks and the extension of credit to customers.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan plans to seek changes to government ethics rules after criticizing Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt for helping a subordinate get a senior job at Bear Stearns Cos. while the New York firm faced an SEC investigation. Levin, ranking Democrat on a Senate panel that oversees government ethics programs, wants rules to forbid an agency chief from initiating calls to help underlings find private-sector jobs, an aide said.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Arthur Levitt, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Wednesday urged mutual fund investors not to overreact to third-quarter fund losses. "I am concerned they've never seen this before, they've never seen a downturn of this magnitude," Levitt said on "NBC Nightly News." "Markets by definition go up and down. The most important factor is to neither fall in love nor become disenchanted with securities."
BUSINESS
May 11, 1999 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The explosion of aggressive stock trading by individual investors is keeping Arthur Levitt and his team at the Securities and Exchange Commission busy these days. In recent speeches, the SEC chairman has expressed concern that many investors are so fascinated with researching and trading stocks over the Internet that they're overlooking the risks involved.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1999
SEC Chairman Arthur Levitt is conducting a special survey of Times readers' general investing habits in an effort to gather information for his speech at the Investment Strategies Conference. Circle the responses that apply to you: 1. How did you make your last trade? a) Through the Internet b) Called my broker c) Called a mutual fund company 2. Before you buy a stock, what do you generally do?
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