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Arthur Jr Levitt

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BUSINESS
April 14, 1999 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Would you buy a "buy" recommendation from these people? America's chief stock market regulator said Tuesday that Wall Street analysts are issuing far too many bullish stock reports, a trend intensifying the long-standing debate over the objectivity of analysts.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Arthur Levitt couldn't muster much support for a proposal to make accounting firms more independent by limiting their ability to sell consulting services to their audit clients. Amid strong opposition from the accounting industry, corporations and members of Congress, the then-chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission backed down.
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BUSINESS
May 11, 1999 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The explosion of aggressive stock trading by individual investors is keeping Arthur Levitt and his team at the Securities and Exchange Commission busy these days. In recent speeches, the SEC chairman has expressed concern that many investors are so fascinated with researching and trading stocks over the Internet that they're overlooking the risks involved.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | Reuters
Arthur Levitt, former chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, signed a deal to write a book detailing the financial world for the individual investor, Knopf Publishing Group said Wednesday. "This book will be a distillation of everything I learned during my eight years at the Securities and Exchange Commission and in my three decades on Wall Street," Levitt said in a statement. Terms were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2000 | Associated Press
SEC Chairman Arthur Levitt, approaching the end of his long tenure, is pushing mutual fund directors to reduce commissions that funds pay to brokerages, much of which are being passed on to investors. Levitt also is threatening action if companies continue to give stock options to executives without shareholders' approval.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt took the chairman of the House Commerce Committee to task for pressing for delays in major rule changes for the Nasdaq Stock Market, according to a letter released Monday. The pressure from Rep. Thomas J. Bliley Jr. (R-Va.) threatened to interfere with a recently concluded SEC investigation of the Nasdaq market, Levitt complained in his July 30 letter to Bliley.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Levitt Concerned About Derivatives: Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt expressed concern about the use of derivative securities by individual investors and state and local pension funds. Levitt called for greater oversight and said securities firms should provide better information to investors before selling derivatives, securities that are tied to the value of bonds, stocks and other assets.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Arthur Levitt Jr. said Thursday that he was resigning as chairman of the American Stock Exchange after 11 years at the nation's third-largest stock market, which has attempted to stem the loss of business to its bigger Wall Street peers by expanding into innovative securities. Levitt, 58, said he would remain at the exchange until a successor is named, and that a search committee had been formed. He said he plans to build his 3-year-old Levitt Communications Inc. into a larger publishing company.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt on Thursday criticized corporations for their disclosure of financial forecasts in a way that favors Wall Street analysts and leaves investors with boilerplate. Levitt said a year-old law that seeks to encourage companies to publicize their expectations is not working because many corporate disclosures are "over-lawyered."
BUSINESS
October 15, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Arthur Levitt, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Wednesday urged mutual fund investors not to overreact to third-quarter fund losses. "I am concerned they've never seen this before, they've never seen a downturn of this magnitude," Levitt said on "NBC Nightly News." "Markets by definition go up and down. The most important factor is to neither fall in love nor become disenchanted with securities."
BUSINESS
November 4, 2000 | Associated Press
SEC Chairman Arthur Levitt, approaching the end of his long tenure, is pushing mutual fund directors to reduce commissions that funds pay to brokerages, much of which are being passed on to investors. Levitt also is threatening action if companies continue to give stock options to executives without shareholders' approval.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1999 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The explosion of aggressive stock trading by individual investors is keeping Arthur Levitt and his team at the Securities and Exchange Commission busy these days. In recent speeches, the SEC chairman has expressed concern that many investors are so fascinated with researching and trading stocks over the Internet that they're overlooking the risks involved.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt blasted the booming online brokerage industry Tuesday, saying the advertising campaigns of some firms risk misleading the public by portraying novice investors getting rich quick. In a speech to the National Press Club in Washington, the nation's top securities regulator said some online brokerage TV ads "more closely resemble commercials for the lottery" than for careful investing with the ever-present risk of loss.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1999 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Would you buy a "buy" recommendation from these people? America's chief stock market regulator said Tuesday that Wall Street analysts are issuing far too many bullish stock reports, a trend intensifying the long-standing debate over the objectivity of analysts.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt has joined the chorus warning about the perils of Internet stocks. "Online investors should remember that it is just as easy, if not more so, to lose money through the click of a button as it is to make it," he said. His remarks come in the wake of dramatic volatility in Net stocks recently. Levitt suggested investors use "limit" orders, setting maximum purchase prices, rather than market orders when submitting a trade in a hot stock.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Arthur Levitt, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Wednesday urged mutual fund investors not to overreact to third-quarter fund losses. "I am concerned they've never seen this before, they've never seen a downturn of this magnitude," Levitt said on "NBC Nightly News." "Markets by definition go up and down. The most important factor is to neither fall in love nor become disenchanted with securities."
BUSINESS
January 28, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt has joined the chorus warning about the perils of Internet stocks. "Online investors should remember that it is just as easy, if not more so, to lose money through the click of a button as it is to make it," he said. His remarks come in the wake of dramatic volatility in Net stocks recently. Levitt suggested investors use "limit" orders, setting maximum purchase prices, rather than market orders when submitting a trade in a hot stock.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt expressed support Sunday for the "circuit breaker" rules approved last week by the New York Stock Exchange. "I think they are reasonable," said Levitt in his first public comment on the NYSE rules, which still have to be approved by the commission. "I'm not a great partisan of circuit breakers, but they are part of the system and I think the limits are much more realistic than they had been."
BUSINESS
July 4, 1997 | JOANNE MORRISON, REUTERS
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt isn't going to be taking first-class flights or staying in more expensive hotels for official business, under an agreement reached with House lawmakers, congressional aides said Thursday.
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