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Arthur Lee

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January 24, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
Arthur Lee's wardrobe may have seemed strange in the 1960s when he and his group, Love, helped set flamboyant fashion trends as one of the first prominent bands on the Los Angeles rock scene. But when Lee turned up for a recent interview wearing a black-and-white pullover bearing the emblem of the confrontational rap group Public Enemy, the fashion statement seemed stranger still.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The scene is a devastated Japan, August 1945, as "Emperor," the new historical drama starring Matthew Fox and Tommy Lee Jones, begins. Hiroshima and Nagasaki are little more than smoking rubble and stone-faced survivors. Emperor Hirohito has officially surrendered but remains protected behind palace walls. Into the morass strides World War II hero Gen. Douglas MacArthur (Jones). He has exactly 10 days to decide whether to put the emperor on trial for war crimes and a cultural expert in Gen. Bonner Fellers (Fox)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Arthur Lee, who forged a legacy as one of rock's great visionaries and forbidding eccentrics while reigning briefly with his band Love as princes of the mid-1960s Sunset Strip, died Thursday of leukemia in a Memphis, Tenn., hospital. He was 61. Mark Linn, a longtime friend, said Lee learned in February that he had leukemia and spent most of his remaining months in the hospital undergoing chemotherapy and an experimental umbilical cord blood treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2006 | John Densmore, Special to The Times
It was 1965 when I rushed down to the Whisky a Go-Go to stand out front and listen to a group called Love. My band, the Doors, was playing in a dumpy club up the street, and we were on a break. I craned my neck past Mario, the doorman, to get a glimpse of a band that was so far ahead of its time, the public still hasn't caught up. The first time I saw Love, I was shocked. They were bizarre.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
The wreck of the Arthur Lee will never return again, never return again. --From "The Wreck of the Arthur Lee," by Robyn Hitchcock. * Arthur Lee leans over a plate of tacos and beans and starts to wave his arms angrily, taking care not to disturb the great pink concoction in front of him that could be the Lake Superior of mixed drinks. The grin marks have vanished from Lee's long, dimpled face.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1967, Love's "Seven and Seven Is" was almost more than a transistor radio could contain. It still stands as one of the greatest two minutes, 15 seconds of relentless, rampaging rock ever recorded, and back then it was all a three-inch speaker could do just to keep from melting when it came on. And those lyrics that Love leader Arthur Lee was singing! Even in those psychedelic-glazed times, they were a bit beyond the pale: If I don't start crying it's because that I have got no eyes .
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The '60s isn't such an easy decade to pin down (not that any decade truly is). And sure enough, Saturday night's bill at the Coach House, which featured Arthur Lee, Spirit and Canned Heat, three Los Angeles rock acts from the '60s, offered nothing like a unified fix on what '60s rock was about, or how it ought to be regarded today. Opener Lee is the mainstay of Love, the Los Angeles band that, back in the '60s, could at its best equal its hometown competition, the Byrds and the Doors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2002 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Nice stripes!" The shout from the packed audience at Spaceland seemed to silence the room for an instant. On the club's small stage, Arthur Lee, who had just removed his jacket to reveal a shirt patterned with thin horizontal stripes, looked quizzically into the crowd as if trying to interpret the comment. Was it a joking allusion to Lee's recent five-year stay in state prison on a firearms charge?
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"All ya need is love," sang those Beatles. "All we need is Love," said the guys at Elektra Records, according to Arthur Lee of Love. In 1965, Love became the first rock band signed to Elektra Records. The second was the Doors. Therein lies some exposition, but more on that later. The musical part of the story unfolds Saturday night at Cheers in Simi Valley. Love's first hit, "Little Red Book," still lives long and prospers on the radio. The band, with its ever-changing cast, still plays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1986 | MICHAEL SEILER, Times Staff Writer
When Corbett Burns goes to the public library, he usually checks out the books any 8-year-old boy would--books on sports, like basketball and football. But last year, something a little different caught his eye. Corbett borrowed a book about first-aid. And Zola Lee, his 65-year-old great-grandmother, is awfully glad he did.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Arthur Lee, who forged a legacy as one of rock's great visionaries and forbidding eccentrics while reigning briefly with his band Love as princes of the mid-1960s Sunset Strip, died Thursday of leukemia in a Memphis, Tenn., hospital. He was 61. Mark Linn, a longtime friend, said Lee learned in February that he had leukemia and spent most of his remaining months in the hospital undergoing chemotherapy and an experimental umbilical cord blood treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2003 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
Live orchestrated rock isn't rare nowadays, but it was back in 1967, when iconic L.A. band Love released "Forever Changes," its eclectic, enduring third album. It sits in the pantheon of influential Southern California collections alongside the Beach Boys' "Pet Sounds," but leader Arthur Lee still took 35 years to muster a full performance, complete with an octet of strings and horns flavoring his groundbreaking blend of folk, pop, flamenco, blues and jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2002 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Nice stripes!" The shout from the packed audience at Spaceland seemed to silence the room for an instant. On the club's small stage, Arthur Lee, who had just removed his jacket to reveal a shirt patterned with thin horizontal stripes, looked quizzically into the crowd as if trying to interpret the comment. Was it a joking allusion to Lee's recent five-year stay in state prison on a firearms charge?
SPORTS
December 30, 1998 | JOHN ORTEGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From being blasted for his unsportsmanlike behavior in the Midwest regional final in March to appearing on the cover of Sports Illustrated in November, point guard Arthur Lee of Stanford experienced the pros and cons of being in the national media spotlight in 1998. In the coming year, the North Hollywood High graduate would like to be known simply as a team leader who helped Stanford win its first NCAA basketball title since 1942.
SPORTS
March 28, 1998 | GREG SANDOVAL
KENTUCKY: THE STARTERS No. 5: Wayne Turner No. 3: Allen Edwards No. 15: Jeff Sheppard No. 34: Scott Padgett No. 13: Nazr Mohammed * * About Kentucky: The Wildcats have so much talent and depth, a 17-point deficit to Duke wasn't enough to stop them. They can score from inside or outside and are led by Jeff Sheppard, a 6-3 guard averaging 13.3 points. The Wildcats showed they can score in bunches and use a drill to hone their lightning-quick attack.
SPORTS
March 26, 1998 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe there is nothing more Arthur Lee can say. Maybe no words can mollify what he did in the waning moments of the Midwest Regional final last Sunday. The Stanford point guard played heroically that afternoon, sinking a string of tough shots and making the steal that finally pushed his team into the lead. But as Rhode Island guard Tyson Wheeler missed two free throws with five seconds remaining, Lee raised his hands to his neck and, with an entire arena watching, flashed the "choke" sign.
SPORTS
February 5, 1995 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A concussion that kept standout guard Arthur Lee from playing in North Hollywood High's 75-48 loss to Monroe on Friday night should not cause him to miss any more action, his father said Saturday. Lee, a senior All-Valley player who has signed a letter of intent to play at Stanford, was injured in a game against Grant on Wednesday. The concussion occurred when he and a Grant player collided while diving for a loose ball, but that was only one of several times Lee hit the floor.
SPORTS
March 25, 1998 | Associated Press
Stanford guard Arthur Lee said Tuesday he was sorry for the mocking choke signs he made when Rhode Island guard Tyson Wheeler missed three free throws near the end of Stanford's 79-77 victory in Sunday's Midwest Regional final. "If I was in my right mind, there's no way that would have happened," said Lee, who seemingly willed the Stanford rally by scoring 13 of his 26 points in the final 2:04. "I'm sure everyone in the whole world could see I was intense and just gone. I was in another world.
SPORTS
March 25, 1998 | Associated Press
Stanford guard Arthur Lee said Tuesday he was sorry for the mocking choke signs he made when Rhode Island guard Tyson Wheeler missed three free throws near the end of Stanford's 79-77 victory in Sunday's Midwest Regional final. "If I was in my right mind, there's no way that would have happened," said Lee, who seemingly willed the Stanford rally by scoring 13 of his 26 points in the final 2:04. "I'm sure everyone in the whole world could see I was intense and just gone. I was in another world.
SPORTS
December 7, 1997 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanford point guard Arthur Lee is no Brevin Knight. He knows he never will be. Still . . . "Every game, I tell myself not to try to be like him," Lee said. "But every game, I start thinking about how he used to play and try to emulate him. That's when I get in trouble." Lee, a 6-foot junior, was in and out of it Saturday in Stanford's 76-74 victory over No. 21 Georgia at the Pond. He had 14 points and three assists. He also had a gaffe--an enormous one with 52 seconds left and the No.
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