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Artificial Pancreas

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NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
On Thursday the Food and Drug Administration issued draft guidelines for researchers and manufacturers working to develop and build an artificial pancreas to help patients with Type 1 diabetes control their blood sugar. About 3 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes, which develops when cells in the pancreas stop producing enough insulin to control blood sugar.  Patients with the disease must monitor their blood glucose aggressively.  If it goes too high, they have to carefully calculate how much insulin they need to bring it in line -- and then get an injection.  If a person with Type 1 diabetes' blood sugar drops too low, he or she could require a dose of another hormone, glucagon, to raise it back up. The unrelenting and error-prone process can be exhausting, so patient advocacy groups such as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation have been pushing the development of an artificial pancreas that would tightly control blood sugar levels much as the actual organ: monitoring glucose levels continually and automatically delivering the right dose of insulin, through a pump, into the body.  The system would work by connecting the monitoring system to a computer, which in turn would calculate the correct insulin dose and send a signal to the insulin pump to deliver the needed hormones.
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SCIENCE
June 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
For Terra Hillyer, who has Type 1 diabetes, enrolling in a clinical trial for a new medical device called the artificial pancreas provided a glimpse of what life might be like without the constant checks of blood sugar levels and infusions of insulin that currently mark her days. “The first thing I do when I wake up is check my blood sugar,” Hillyer says. “It is the background noise of my life.” Except for one day recently, when the mother of two checked into the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute in Santa Barbara.
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SCIENCE
June 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
For Terra Hillyer, who has Type 1 diabetes, enrolling in a clinical trial for a new medical device called the artificial pancreas provided a glimpse of what life might be like without the constant checks of blood sugar levels and infusions of insulin that currently mark her days. “The first thing I do when I wake up is check my blood sugar,” Hillyer says. “It is the background noise of my life.” Except for one day recently, when the mother of two checked into the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute in Santa Barbara.
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
On Thursday the Food and Drug Administration issued draft guidelines for researchers and manufacturers working to develop and build an artificial pancreas to help patients with Type 1 diabetes control their blood sugar. About 3 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes, which develops when cells in the pancreas stop producing enough insulin to control blood sugar.  Patients with the disease must monitor their blood glucose aggressively.  If it goes too high, they have to carefully calculate how much insulin they need to bring it in line -- and then get an injection.  If a person with Type 1 diabetes' blood sugar drops too low, he or she could require a dose of another hormone, glucagon, to raise it back up. The unrelenting and error-prone process can be exhausting, so patient advocacy groups such as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation have been pushing the development of an artificial pancreas that would tightly control blood sugar levels much as the actual organ: monitoring glucose levels continually and automatically delivering the right dose of insulin, through a pump, into the body.  The system would work by connecting the monitoring system to a computer, which in turn would calculate the correct insulin dose and send a signal to the insulin pump to deliver the needed hormones.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | Janet Stobart / Los Angeles Times
A team of European doctors has tested an “artificial pancreas” aimed at helping pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes control their blood sugar. The goal? To lower their risk of having an abnormal birth or a fatal episode of hypoglycemia. Funded by the charitable foundation Diabetes UK , the research explores the during-pregnancy potential of a device the size of a cellphone. This "pancreas" has a continuous glucose monitor and an insulin pump that maintains a reliable level of blood sugar.
NEWS
December 16, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Animal researchers reported Sunday a major advance toward the development of an artificial pancreas that could provide long-lasting therapy for diabetes--without daily insulin injections--and potentially eliminate its crippling side effects. The Massachusetts scientists devised a technique that allows them to transplant insulin-secreting pancreatic cells from cows, dogs and pigs into rats without suppressing the recipient's immune system and without fear of rejection.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Physicians at St. Vincent Medical Center announced Thursday that they have begun the first U.S. human trials of an artificial pancreas that they hope will someday free diabetics from the need for insulin injections. The artificial pancreas was implanted last week in the abdomen of 38-year-old Steven Craig of Lake Isabella, who has been diabetic for more than 30 years and has been unable to work for seven years because of complications of the disease.
SCIENCE
April 15, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Boston researchers have made a major step toward the development of an artificial pancreas that overcomes the bugaboo of most previous such attempts -- dangerously low blood sugar caused by injection of too much insulin. Their experimental device secretes two hormones normally produced by the pancreas -- insulin and its counterbalancing hormone, called glucagon -- and has been shown to control blood sugar levels in about a dozen people for at least 24 hours, they reported Wednesday.
HEALTH
November 1, 2010 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Every night, Edward Damiano wakes three to four times to monitor his 11-year-old son's blood sugar levels. Damiano administers insulin remotely through a pump when his son's blood sugar reading is high or gives him juice through a straw when his blood sugar falls. His son, David, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 11 months old, sleeps peacefully through it all ? and that's exactly what worries Damiano. "You can check his blood sugar all night long and he won't wake up," Damiano says.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
An artificial pancreas implanted in a Lake Isabella diabetic six months ago to test its safety--the first and apparently only such implant ever done in the United States--has proved so effective that surgeons Monday made a second implant in an effort to completely free the patient from insulin shots. The new implant, performed like the first at St.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Alfred E. Mann, 85, is an aerospace and biomedical entrepreneur who founded 17 companies over six decades and became a billionaire philanthropist. Niche man: Although he had no formal business training, Mann has demonstrated a knack for capitalizing on investment opportunities. His secret: Identify an unmet need and come up with a technology to fill it. The result has been a string of companies with names like Spectrolab, Heliotek, MiniMed and Advanced Bionics.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | Janet Stobart / Los Angeles Times
A team of European doctors has tested an “artificial pancreas” aimed at helping pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes control their blood sugar. The goal? To lower their risk of having an abnormal birth or a fatal episode of hypoglycemia. Funded by the charitable foundation Diabetes UK , the research explores the during-pregnancy potential of a device the size of a cellphone. This "pancreas" has a continuous glucose monitor and an insulin pump that maintains a reliable level of blood sugar.
HEALTH
November 1, 2010 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Every night, Edward Damiano wakes three to four times to monitor his 11-year-old son's blood sugar levels. Damiano administers insulin remotely through a pump when his son's blood sugar reading is high or gives him juice through a straw when his blood sugar falls. His son, David, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 11 months old, sleeps peacefully through it all ? and that's exactly what worries Damiano. "You can check his blood sugar all night long and he won't wake up," Damiano says.
NEWS
July 30, 2010
UC San Diego researchers have developed an implantable glucose sensor for diabetics that has worked for a year in pigs and that could be a major step forward toward the development of an artificial pancreas. As many as 800,000 people already use external insulin pumps that, through programming, inject a continuous background level of insulin and higher jolts at mealtimes or when a physical blood test indicates. The goal of many researchers has been to develop a continuous glucose monitor that can be implanted and send electronic signals to control how much insulin the pump secretes, thereby mimicking the action of the pancreas.
SCIENCE
April 15, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Boston researchers have made a major step toward the development of an artificial pancreas that overcomes the bugaboo of most previous such attempts -- dangerously low blood sugar caused by injection of too much insulin. Their experimental device secretes two hormones normally produced by the pancreas -- insulin and its counterbalancing hormone, called glucagon -- and has been shown to control blood sugar levels in about a dozen people for at least 24 hours, they reported Wednesday.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1995 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. David Scharp figures he just got the chance of a lifetime. For two decades, the noted St. Louis surgeon has been working on new treatments for diabetics. He joined Neocrin Inc. recently and found himself in the thick of a race to develop a new method for attacking diabetes. The small research firm is on the cutting edge of technology as it experiments with an implant that can act like a pancreas and eliminate the need for insulin injections. "This is the assault on the summit!"
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
A plastic pancreas that kept diabetic laboratory animals healthy for months with automatic doses of insulin holds promise for a permanent treatment of diabetes, researchers say in a new study. Shaped like a hockey puck but slightly smaller, the two-ounce artificial pancreas houses transplanted insulin-producing cells. A unique membrane protects the cells from rejection by the immune system while allowing insulin to merge with the bloodstream.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
An artificial pancreas implanted in a Lake Isabella diabetic six months ago to test its safety--the first and apparently only such implant ever done in the United States--has proved so effective that surgeons Monday made a second implant in an effort to completely free the patient from insulin shots. The new implant, performed like the first at St.
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