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Artist Rights

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BUSINESS
January 21, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four powerful labor organizations will enter the artist rights fray this week, supporting state legislation that could open the door to free agency for recording acts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 21, 2009
Re "Vietnamese protest art exhibit," Jan. 18 The Vietnamese American community in Santa Ana is within the rights granted it by the 1st Amendment when it protests the exhibit showing a young girl wearing a representation of Vietnam's flag standing next to a bust of Ho Chi Minh. The problem is that the city closed the exhibit because of the protest. In effect, the protesters have stepped on the 1st Amendment rights of the artists. In our country, we are guaranteed freedom of expression.
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OPINION
January 21, 2009
Re "Vietnamese protest art exhibit," Jan. 18 The Vietnamese American community in Santa Ana is within the rights granted it by the 1st Amendment when it protests the exhibit showing a young girl wearing a representation of Vietnam's flag standing next to a bust of Ho Chi Minh. The problem is that the city closed the exhibit because of the protest. In effect, the protesters have stepped on the 1st Amendment rights of the artists. In our country, we are guaranteed freedom of expression.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2002 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Ever since the Clinton administration loosened restrictions on how many radio stations a broadcaster could own, record label executives have complained that media consolidation would lead to bland playlists and homogenous programming. Now a coalition of musicians and independent record label executives say they have statistical proof that the relaxation of ownership rules has stifled recording artists and "damaged radio as a public resource."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1994
Friends and supporters of the Artists Rights Foundation can get satisfaction and donate funds by purchasing prime seats at the Rolling Stones' Oct. 21 show at the Rose Bowl. The tickets, offered by the band, also include a "Beggars Banquet" at the Directors Guild of America, and a chartered party bus to the Bowl. Prices range from $250 to $325, a portion of which is tax deductible. For information, call Ted Kaufman at (310) 289-5336.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1987 | DON SNOWDEN
When Los Angeles songwriter Richard Berry sold his songs to his publishing company 30 years ago, he had no way of knowing that he was signing away the rights to a future gold mine for $750. One of those songs was "Louie Louie," the garage-rock classic that was a smash hit for the Kingsmen in 1963 and was subsequently recorded by countless acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An obscure amendment to a bill that Congress passed minutes before it adjourned has established, for the first time in federal legislation, the right of artists, photographers, sculptors and printmakers to protect their work from unauthorized mutilation and change.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Social Distortion leader Mike Ness wrote "Ball & Chain" in 1988 as a testament to one man's rise from the pit of despair, but when he sang it Tuesday at the Wiltern Theatre, its refrain seemed the ideal summation of many musicians' view of the record industry's standard contract provisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was wine-tasting from the private stock of Francis Ford Coppola and hors d'oeuvres from Los Angeles' trendiest eateries being served. But the real reason several hundred of the film industry's creative community joined such heavyweights as Steven Spielberg, George Lucas and agent Michael Ovitz on Wednesday night, was to launch the Artists Rights Foundation--an organization that will work toward giving film artists the right to object to any tampering of their work.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Online music retailer EMusic Inc. introduced a new technology Tuesday that critics called the most invasive software weapon unleashed on consumers who swap free music files on the Internet. The Redwood City, Calif.-based company said the software program is aimed squarely at users of the Napster song-swapping service and is a last-resort effort to educate the public about the seriousness of online piracy.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2002 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did Courtney cave? Rock singer Courtney Love, who sued the world's biggest music company to expose the record industry's allegedly corrupt business practices, had vowed never to settle. But she did exactly that on Monday amid questions about the future of the artists' rights movement she helped launch.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Social Distortion leader Mike Ness wrote "Ball & Chain" in 1988 as a testament to one man's rise from the pit of despair, but when he sang it Tuesday at the Wiltern Theatre, its refrain seemed the ideal summation of many musicians' view of the record industry's standard contract provisions.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four powerful labor organizations will enter the artist rights fray this week, supporting state legislation that could open the door to free agency for recording acts.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Online music retailer EMusic Inc. introduced a new technology Tuesday that critics called the most invasive software weapon unleashed on consumers who swap free music files on the Internet. The Redwood City, Calif.-based company said the software program is aimed squarely at users of the Napster song-swapping service and is a last-resort effort to educate the public about the seriousness of online piracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1997 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pearl Jam fans won't be able to buy the rock group's new Epic Records album until Feb. 3, but all they needed to sample nearly half the album's songs for free this month was a little computer savvy. The development--reportedly the first time such a large portion of an unreleased album by a superstar act has been "pirated" on the Internet--raises major questions about how record companies will be able to combat bootlegging in the Computer Age.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1997 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Advances in technology may partially resolve the long-standing feud between film artists and the studios over who owns--and can alter--the final cut of a released film, agreed leaders on both sides. That, however, is nearly all they agree upon. The dispute will be highlighted again today and Friday at an Artists Rights Foundation symposium, to be held at the Directors Guild of America offices in West Hollywood.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2002 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did Courtney cave? Rock singer Courtney Love, who sued the world's biggest music company to expose the record industry's allegedly corrupt business practices, had vowed never to settle. But she did exactly that on Monday amid questions about the future of the artists' rights movement she helped launch.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1994
Friends and supporters of the Artists Rights Foundation can get satisfaction and donate funds by purchasing prime seats at the Rolling Stones' Oct. 21 show at the Rose Bowl. The tickets, offered by the band, also include a "Beggars Banquet" at the Directors Guild of America, and a chartered party bus to the Bowl. Prices range from $250 to $325, a portion of which is tax deductible. For information, call Ted Kaufman at (310) 289-5336.
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