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NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Jon Healey
It's a familiar stereotype: Country-music fans are Republicans; pop and hip-hop listeners are Democrats. Well, according to a new analysis by the Echo Nest, those stereotypes happen to strike pretty close to the truth. The Echo Nest, whose platform powers the customized webcasts at Spotify and iHeartRadio, among other sites, uses sophisticated analytical tools to categorize songs for the sake of generating compelling playlists. It also has been developing (anonymized) "taste profiles" of listeners based on their use of those sites and the feedback they provide.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2011 | By Jori Finkel and Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
For decades, gallery owners in California have wished that the state's Resale Royalty Act of 1976, which provides artists with 5% of the sales price of artworks when they are resold under certain conditions, would just go away. While some dealers follow the law and pay the royalty to artists, others do not. But it's hard to track what artists may be owed in either case, given the difficulty of getting the galleries to disclose information on their sales. Now, working to force some disclosures as well as recover money, the foundation of the late abstract painter Sam Francis is the lead plaintiff in class-action lawsuits filed Tuesday against nine galleries in Northern and Southern California.
OPINION
March 10, 2009 | Charles Fleming, Charles Fleming lives and works in Silver Lake. His last book was "My Lobotomy," written with Howard Dully.
Most of the people I know don't have regular jobs. They're writers, actors, musicians, artists, photographers and filmmakers. They also are middle-class taxpayers who carry mortgages and send their kids to public school. They're used to hard times. They've always lived project to project, rather than paycheck to paycheck. They've learned how to cut costs, eliminate excess and wait out the dry spells. "I'm good at this," one actor friend said.
TRAVEL
September 15, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds
More often than it should, my mind slips away to Alaska. To follow, you'd need to fly to Anchorage, rent a car, then drive to Homer, as I did in the summer of 1994. Homer is nice - a quirky hamlet on the Kenai Peninsula where eagles fly, bears swat at leaping salmon and your halibut might outweigh you. But Homer is only the jumping-off spot for my daydreams. My happy place is six miles across Kachemak Bay: Halibut Cove, once a fishing settlement on the island of Ismailof, then a ghost town, now an artists colony and summer apparition.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Rex Ranch in Arizona is poised to become an ambitious artists' retreat, if a Sundance Institute executive can come up with the money to buy the 50-acre former dude ranch by the middle of December. Located on a pristine patch of land with breathtaking scenery in the Sonoran Desert in the small town of Amado, about 30 miles south of Tucson, Rex Ranch was built in 1880 and later served as a resort before being abandoned. The property, which features 35 attractive rose-colored adobe buildings, was originally for sale for $2 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
Who's afraid of the big, broad biennial? Not Dan Cameron, who organized ambitious exhibition events like Prospect New Orleans before becoming chief curator at the Orange County Museum of Art last year. Now, his first big group show in his new job is shaping up to be a global mash-up shaped by seismic geopolitical undercurrents. Called the California-Pacific Triennial, the show features 32 artists from 15 countries that border the Pacific Ocean. This show replaces the California Biennial, a regular museum attraction that often promised more than it delivered, and the new project has a more sustainable every-three-years schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
The Women Artists Archives National Directory -- the first digital directory of information about women artists active in the U.S. since World War II -- has been launched at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., with the help of a $149,000 grant from the Getty Foundation, the philanthropic branch of the J. Paul Getty Trust. The goal is to fill a large gap in published art history by producing a digital directory of sources where the artists' artworks and papers can be found.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
He is best known as a video artist, but Doug Aitken has a thing for "happenings. " He brought street musicians and famous singers together for a "pop rally" at New York's Museum of Modern Art. He turned a barge in Greece into a floating theater for videos and live performance. He planted undercover percussionists in a Seattle crowd as a way to bring a city block to life. Now Aitken plans to take the idea on the road, sending a group of artists and musicians on an Amtrak train from New York to California, with 10 stops for art and performances - including in L.A. - along the way. He calls the project, planned for September, "Station to Station: A Nomadic Happening.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By David Ng
A group of prominent cultural personalities have signed an open letter to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg asking the city to send more relief to the Rockaways, a part of Queens that was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy. The letter -- whose signatories include Marina Abramovic, Cindy Sherman, Anna Deavere Smith and Richard Phillips -- states that families in the Rockaways "are still standing next to their destroyed and ruined houses trying to keep warm without food, water, electricity, heat, or internet.
WORLD
May 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice met Iranian artists whose work is on display at Washington's Meridian International Center at an event intended to promote cultural links. Ten of the 14 Iranians who received special visas for the exhibition refused to be photographed with Rice, and two would not accompany her through the gallery because they were "uncomfortable," two organizers said.
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