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Arts Federal Aid

ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts has awarded 1990 grants to a half dozen arts groups that played key roles in the ongoing NEA political controversy in the face of opposition from certain conservative politicians and groups, NEA sources said Monday. At the same time, however, a national movement seemed to develop to oppose restrictions on federal funding of arts programs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cultural diversity in the arts--or the lack of it--has been debated ad infinitum. Now a UC Irvine professor says he's documented what many artists and others say they've long suspected: Minorities aren't getting their fair share of federal arts funding. "The data clearly show that less money is given to support minority arts activity than could be considered equitable," says sociology professor Samuel Gilmore.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts announced a $30-million round of grants Saturday, including $15,000 to two avant garde arts groups whose applications for other funds were recently denied because of explicitly sexual works the Endowment said lacked "artistic merit."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA officials plan to urge next week that the University of California administration allow them to turn down all grants from the National Endowment for the Arts this year, and will recommend the entire nine-campus UC system take the same action, The Times learned Thursday. UCLA has received notification of two 1990 grants totaling $40,000, and has another nine pending requests totaling more than $700,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could call Todd Haynes, 30, a quintessential Valley Boy. He grew up in Encino, learning to read and write at Lanai Road School, and later attending Gaspar De Portola Junior High--both as Valley as can be. Eventually, Haynes got his diploma from the alternative private Oakwood School in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A conservative Mississippi-based group led by the Rev. Donald Wildmon has opened a new attack on the National Endowment for the Arts, charging that an award-winning avant-garde motion picture partially funded by the NEA includes explicit anal sex. The attack on "Poison," a film by New York-based director Todd Haynes, comes as Wildmon's American Family Assn. and at least two other conservative organizations have moved to revive last year's public debate over the NEA.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1989 | LORI SILVER and ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writers
The Senate Wednesday, falling to pressure from conservatives, voted to bar the National Endowment for the Arts from funding "obscene artwork" that denigrates the beliefs of a particular religion. Sponsored by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), the amendment to the Interior Appropriations bill was approved on a voice vote and sparked little debate. "No artist has a preemptive claim on taxpayer funds" to pay for obscene art, Helms said on the Senate floor. Sen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that "artistic expression is at the core of a democratic society," a federal judge Tuesday found a National Endowment for the Arts decency standard used in the agency's grant-making process to be unconstitutional. Los Angeles District Judge A. Wallace Tashima called the NEA wording "vague" and said in his 44-page decision that the decency clause "sweeps within its ambit speech and artistic expression which is protected by the First Amendment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's artistic community has lost much of its political momentum in Congress and it is likely that content-control standards are permanently imposed on the National Endowment for the Arts, a prominent congressional arts leader predicts. If the trend continues, said Rep. Pat Williams (D-Mont.), arts groups may, as early as within the next six months, face an agonizing dilemma: Whether the Endowment should be allowed to evolve into a sort of national censorship panel or simply be dissolved.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1994 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts has announced $1.65 million in funding cuts, including more than $700,000 in support for the American Film Institute's preservation program and its support to independent film and video makers. Those funds are among so-called "sub-grants"--money given to organizations that funnel funds to artists or arts groups--that will be suspended by the NEA in the next couple of years. The NEA maintains it is making the cuts because Congress has pared $3.
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