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April 15, 1990 | DAVID WHARTON
Pee-Wee Herman tap-danced across cafeteria tables and Ultra Violet worked the school switchboard. Theater students rehearsed Chekhov in a cow pasture. "It was Juilliard on drugs," recalled one student. The professors were avant-garde artists who threw conventional training out the window. "No grades, no degrees, no institutional hours," a music teacher said. "I told my students, 'Why should we meet every Thursday at 9:30 in the morning?
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Friday night in a city where creativity spins in a Hollywood whirlpool. But in a cavernous dark room at the Track 16 Gallery, the spotlight shines on a writer. And everybody is relishing his tale of troubled sleep. "The refrigerator goes off like a space shuttle launch! There's no point in trying to sleep anymore. It's too much work," Joe Donnelly reads. "It won't take but a second to think of all you've lost and how you've lost it." Laughter ripples through the room. Who hasn't been there?
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is a black prostitute. At a 24-hour gas station, she finds her prince, a "rich" Spaniard/Dutchman/American--whatever--it doesn't matter to her so long as he's not Cuban. They go dancing. They have sex. She brings him, loaded with gifts, to meet her family. Her family welcomes him into their home. He takes her out of Cuba, bringing her to his country. They marry, have two white children and live happily ever after.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
A community arts program has received nearly $1.2 million in federal funding that will be used to create 10 teleconferencing sites to connect high school students throughout Los Angeles County, officials said Tuesday. In its 11th year, the Community Arts Partnership of the California Institute of the Arts in Santa Clarita has involved 85,000 students, mainly from underserved parts of Los Angeles County.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1999
The 1999-2000 season of the Long Beach Symphony, its 65th, will offer a seven-concert Classics series, a four-event Pops series and introduce Holiday Concerts, also in the Terrace Theater at the Long Beach Performing Arts Center. Music Director JoAnn Falletta will conduct six of the seven Classics programs, beginning Oct. 16, when Andre-Michel Schub plays Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3 on a program also listing John Luther Adams' "The Time of Drumming" and Brahms' First Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1998
Five Los Angeles-based visual artists and 10 local arts groups will share in $195,000 in fellowships and grants from the California Community Foundation's J. Paul Getty Trust Fund for the Visual Arts. Winners of the visual arts fellowships, which carry a stipend of $15,000 each, are photographer Laura Aguilar, experimental film and video artist Juan Garza, and painters Barbara Carrasco, Roberto Gil Del Montes and Pattsi Valdez.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the most part, the arts in Los Angeles are booming. In the wake of the Getty Center opening, Walt Disney Concert Hall finally got its green light. A spate of mid-size theaters such as the El Portal in North Hollywood and the International City Theatre in Long Beach have emerged. The city has more than 1,100 nonprofit arts organizations and is considered a nexus for cutting-edge classical music and visual arts. The perception, however, doesn't always match reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1997 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They go back, those who are left, more than 40 years to a time when blacks integrating the all-white musicians union realized that something was missing. It was 1953 and that something missing was the camaraderie they shared as members of the all-black Local 767 Rhythm Club on Central Avenue, the main thoroughfare of West Coast jazz at the time. Many felt that bond, that identity, was lost when they moved to their new Hollywood home at Local 47.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1996
The South Bay Children's Choir is gearing up for its first performance Sunday, which will feature a variety of popular Christmas and Hanukkah songs. Organized in September, the 60-member musical group is the first regional choir in the South Bay. The organization was formed by veteran choir directors Jane Hardester and Diane Simons to fill the musical gap left as schools discontinued their music programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1994
Forty-five county arts groups will share $128,500 in matching grants recently approved by the L.A. County Board of Supervisors. The grants, awarded through the National/State/County Partnership grant program, help small-budget and emerging arts groups from all disciplines. This year's grants range from $1,000 to $10,000 with the largest awards going to the organizations Great Leap ($10,000); L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2000
Here are the locations, hours and prices of the politically themed cultural events going on in Los Angeles during the Democratic National Convention: "Madison Avenue Goes to Washington: The History of Presidential Campaign Advertising," Museum of Television & Radio, 465 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills. Wednesdays through Sundays. 3 p.m. Ends Nov. 12. $6; senior citizens and students, $4; under age 12, $3. (310) 786-1000.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2000 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Art, drama, film and TV reflect--and, some would say, shape--the nation's social climate. So as the delegates, pols and protesters come to town for the Democratic National Convention, politically themed exhibits, screenings and performances arrive too. One such production is "Madison Avenue Goes to Washington: The History of Presidential Campaign Advertising" at the Museum of Television & Radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the most part, the arts in Los Angeles are booming. In the wake of the Getty Center opening, Walt Disney Concert Hall finally got its green light. A spate of mid-size theaters such as the El Portal in North Hollywood and the International City Theatre in Long Beach have emerged. The city has more than 1,100 nonprofit arts organizations and is considered a nexus for cutting-edge classical music and visual arts. The perception, however, doesn't always match reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nostalgia tends to be in the eye--or the ear--of the beholder. For Generation X, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young tours, concerts by Bob Dylan or Joni Mitchell or even the Rolling Stones fall neatly into the category of baby boomer nostalgia. But reframe the reference point, take the perspective back a couple more decades and nostalgia takes on an entirely different character.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
For decades, the L.A. theater scene has been divided mostly between the large and the small. A handful of big theaters--such as the Mark Taper Forum and the Pantages, ranging in size from 700 to nearly 3,000 seats--dominate the territory, staging well-endowed productions and maintaining high public profiles. At the same time, more than a hundred professional but tiny theaters, each with fewer than 100 seats, struggle for a chance to be noticed, often operating on a shoestring.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN
Sure, a centennial is a natural time for new productions of major work from important artists such as Kurt Weill. The question is, why "Happy End"? "The songs," Weba Garretson says flatly. "It has all the great songs." As Salvation Army missionary Lillian Holiday, Garretson gets to sing many of those songs--including "Surabaya Johnny" and "Bilbao Song"--in a new production of the show opening Wednesday at the Museum of Contemporary Art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a decade of ambitious proposals and feuding with environmentalists, a San Fernando Valley arts group Tuesday submitted what federal officials characterize as a "reasonable" plan for a cultural center in the Sepulveda Basin. The envisioned Arts Park L. A. would include a theater, a museum and workshops built across 52 acres of greenery on the basin's northern edge, near the intersection of Victory and Balboa boulevards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1997
A new city-commissioned study says businesses dealing with the arts generate $1.27 billion a year in economic activity. The six-month study found that businesses dealing with the arts employ more than 8,500 people. In addition, art show visitors generate 10,000 additional jobs. Art exhibits also benefit the city spiritually, said Maria Luisa de Herrera, city cultural affairs administrator. "The human race's creative nature needs to be fed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The poly-stylistic, media-mingling, genre-busting musician is not a recent invention. The first half of the 20th century--when music seemed so deeply split into competing philosophies--also was the playground of Kurt Weill. Like so many composers today, Weill was influenced by popular music, and especially attracted to theater productions that blended music, drama, dance and film in new ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU
Culture and arts education for youth in the Antelope Valley are receiving a significant boost through recent grants totaling $70,000, the Lancaster Performing Arts Center Foundation has announced. The money will help fund several programs for the area's kindergarten through high school students, enabling them to take music workshops, learn art history, go on museum tours, and attend lectures and theater performances, said Carol Rock, marketing coordinator for the arts center.
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