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October 11, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Shin Hak Chul landed in jail last summer because of his fans--the paper kind. A student project to reprint one of Shin's oil paintings on hand-held paper fans caught the discriminating eye of an art critic in the anti-Communist bureau of the Seoul Metropolitan Police Headquarters. Never mind that Shin's work, "Rice Planting," was painted in obscurity two years ago. Authorities now think it glorifies North Korea by depicting a Utopian scene of smiling peasants near Mt.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Patrick Pacheco, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar from New York
Toward the end of "The Last Empress," the new Korean musical, Queen Min, in a duet with her son the crown prince, urges him to nurture his dreams, to grow "to be the strong pillar of the nation--and come out to meet the world in style!" The controversial empress--part Evita, part Joan of Arc--is the central character in this sweeping, lavish production, which opens next Sunday in Century City at the Shubert Theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1993 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jang Yong-Soo, 89, was a boy growing up in a small North Korean village, his family owned a noodle shop, and his sister owned a brewery. So the Jang family was especially popular on May 5 when the country's masked dancers would come through town. "We were able to provide food and drinks for all the dance troupes," Jang reminisced through a translator in a conversation last week at Los Angeles' Korean Cultural Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1993 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jang Yong-Soo, 89, was a boy growing up in a small North Korean village, his family owned a noodle shop, and his sister owned a brewery. So the Jang family was especially popular on May 5 when the country's masked dancers would come through town. "We were able to provide food and drinks for all the dance troupes," Jang reminisced through a translator in a conversation last week at Los Angeles' Korean Cultural Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History was made Tuesday when the United Nations admitted North and South Korea as full voting members, ending a 40-year Cold War stalemate over the issue. But that does not mean the two countries have begun to end their differences, politically or artistically.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Patrick Pacheco, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar from New York
Toward the end of "The Last Empress," the new Korean musical, Queen Min, in a duet with her son the crown prince, urges him to nurture his dreams, to grow "to be the strong pillar of the nation--and come out to meet the world in style!" The controversial empress--part Evita, part Joan of Arc--is the central character in this sweeping, lavish production, which opens next Sunday in Century City at the Shubert Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History was made Tuesday when the United Nations admitted North and South Korea as full voting members, ending a 40-year Cold War stalemate over the issue. But that does not mean the two countries have begun to end their differences, politically or artistically.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Shin Hak Chul landed in jail last summer because of his fans--the paper kind. A student project to reprint one of Shin's oil paintings on hand-held paper fans caught the discriminating eye of an art critic in the anti-Communist bureau of the Seoul Metropolitan Police Headquarters. Never mind that Shin's work, "Rice Planting," was painted in obscurity two years ago. Authorities now think it glorifies North Korea by depicting a Utopian scene of smiling peasants near Mt.
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