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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Last fall, when the big traveling retrospective of Los Angeles artist Mike Kelley (1954-2012) opened at MoMA PS1, the Museum of Modern Art's outpost in Long Island City, N.Y., the show looked smashing. Largely that was due to the intrinsic quality of Kelley's diverse work in a staggeringly wide range of media - sculpture, painting, drawing, installation, video, performance, mosaic - plus various mash-ups of just about all of them. Partly, though, it was serendipity. PHOTOS: 'Mike Kelley' exhibit A primary subject of Kelley's art is the way familiar social institutions of daily life - especially school and church, but also including art museums and other representatives of authoritative points of view - inevitably conspire to constrain, pressure and sometimes even warp the very adherents they seek to console and liberate.
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TRAVEL
March 28, 2014 | By Ryan Ritchie
You might know Claremont as that town with five liberal arts colleges and two graduate schools within its city limits. What you might not know is that it boasts a vibrant downtown, called Claremont Village, where more than 150 mom-and-pop restaurants, boutiques, art galleries and music venues create a relaxed atmosphere for all ages. If that weren't enticing enough, the Metrolink/Transit Center drops off passengers just a baseball toss away. The tab: A king bed at Casa 425 begins at $195.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
The son of infamous German art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, who helped Adolf Hitler hoard art looted from Jews during the Holocaust, says he's now willing to return works his father had acquired to the heirs of their victimized owners. Attorney Christoph Edel, a court-appointed legal guardian for the 81-year-old Cornelius Gurlitt, issued a statement on Gurlitt's website this week saying that Gurlitt has told him, “if the works…should be justifiably suspected of being Nazi-looted art, please give them back to their Jewish owners.” Added Edel: “Let there be no doubt that we will comply with the instructions of our client.” It's a stronger commitment than Gurlitt previously had made.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
It's only March but Pharrell Williams already gets our vote for multi-hyphenate of the year. The latest project involving the music-producing, Grammy-winning, hat-wearing fashion plate is a long-term deal with global apparel and footwear brand Adidas, tha company announced Thursday.  According to the press release issued by Adidas, the first Adidas Originals x Pharrell Williams products will drop this summer. It goes on to note that this is the first time the company has teamed with "a designer who owns their own textile company.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a scene midway through Gareth Evans' action-crime thriller "The Raid 2" that exemplifies the excruciating and exhilarating experience of this gripping paean to the ballet, brutality and blood that courses through martial arts films. The players are not the key ones, but the action is exquisite as two attractive 20-ish Indonesian assassins, a brother-sister team, identify their target in a subway car. Amid tight space and other passengers, Hammer Girl, a mesmerizing Julie Estelle, her long hair swinging in time with the claw hammers she wields, approaches the prey; her brother, Baseball Bat Man (Very Tri Yulisman)
NEWS
March 26, 2014
John Corrigan is the assistant managing editor for Arts and Entertainment, leading one of the Los Angeles Times' largest editorial departments in its coverage of film, television, culture, music, media and the fine arts. Corrigan has worked at The Times since 1999, serving as Business editor from 2009 to June 2012. He greatly expanded the Business section's online presence, adding daily video reports and building up its Tech Now and Money & Co. blogs. Corrigan directed several of The Times' most ambitious projects, including stories that won Loeb Awards in 2010 and 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By David Ng
Shigeru Ban, the Japanese architect who is the recipient of the 2014 Pritzker Prize, has never had his name attached to a permanent art museum in the U.S. in his three-decade-long career. But that will change in August when his new building for the Aspen Art Museum in Colorado opens to the public. The block-like structure, which features 33,000 square feet of space, will open in celebration of the museum's 35th anniversary. With a reported price tag of $45 million, the building will feature six primary gallery spaces on the museum's four levels.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Steppingstones cross a reflecting pool at the entrance to this contemporary home, which evokes a travertine-encased museum. Designed with expanses of walls for art display and an open floor plan for entertaining, the house centers on a 34-foot-high window-topped gallery that runs the length of the roof and brings in natural light. Location: 2251 Linda Flora Drive, Bel-Air 90077 Asking price: $12.5 million Year built: 2013 House size: Four bedrooms, four bathrooms, 9,372 square feet including guesthouse, breezeways and patios Lot size: 3.2 acres Features: Fourteen-foot-tall ceilings, glass walls, glass-floor library looks down on wine room, upstairs office, deck, guesthouse with kitchen, swimming pool, loggia with fireplace, gated driveway, motor court, three-car garage, canyon views About the area: Last year, 157 single-family homes sold in the 90077 ZIP Code at a median price of $1.945 million, according to DataQuick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Corina Knoll
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to pay a $500,000 settlement in a case centering on the 2011 death of a 2-month-old boy who was killed when a driver overran the curb and plowed into pedestrians during the Downtown Art Walk. In a 2012 legal complaint, Jimmy and Natasha Vasquez, of Montebello, alleged that their son's death was the result of the city's “failure to properly design and create safe walking areas for pedestrians and/or place sufficient barriers and protections for pedestrians from vehicles” at the downtown event.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Philippe Vergne says his first task as the new director of L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art is not to act quickly but to think and plan deeply. On the job less than two weeks after extensive past experience as director of New York's Dia Art Foundation and top curator and deputy director of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Vergne spelled out no immediate changes Wednesday and said he'll look to MOCA's past achievements for guidance. GRAPHIC: MOCA's ups and downs with Jeffrey Deitch "The most important priority is to look at the programming and reimagine the program" of exhibitions and events, he said as he joined Lilly Tartikoff Karatz and Maurice Marciano, MOCA's new board co-chairs, and Maria Seferian, the museum's interim director before his arrival, for a discussion with Los Angeles Times reporters and editors.
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