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Arturo Beltran Leyva

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WORLD
December 18, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
He was one of Mexico's most notorious drug traffickers, embroiled in fights to the death with rival gangsters and the Mexican military. His crude signature -- proclaiming him the "boss of bosses" -- showed up regularly next to the headless bodies of his foes. So when Arturo Beltran Leyva fell dead Wednesday night during a frenzied gunfight with Mexican naval commandos, authorities declared a major blow struck against one of Mexico's meanest smuggling groups. "This action represents an important achievement for the people and government of Mexico and a heavy blow against one of the most dangerous criminal organizations in Mexico," President Felipe Calderon said Thursday from Copenhagen, where he was attending an international climate conference.
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WORLD
December 2, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
In contrast to their upbeat public assessments, U.S. officials expressed frustration with a "risk averse" Mexican army and rivalries among security agencies that have hampered the Mexican government's war against drug cartels, according to secret U.S. diplomatic cables disclosed Thursday. The cables quoted Mexican officials expressing fear that the government was losing control of parts of its national territory and that time was "running out" to rein in drug violence. The cables gave a much starker view of the pitfalls and obstacles facing Mexican President Felipe Calderon, a departure from the public statements of unwavering support that have come out of Washington for most of the 4-year-old war, which has claimed more than 30,000 lives.
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WORLD
December 23, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The young marine received the highest military honors that the Mexican state could offer. Killed during a raid that ended the life of a notorious drug lord, the marine was buried a hero, ushered to his grave by an honor guard of commandos in camouflage, his mother awarded a folded flag. Hours later, the grieving mother, the marine's sister, his brother and an aunt were mowed down by gunmen in a revenge attack that sent a chilling message to the Mexican military combating drug traffickers.
OPINION
September 7, 2010
The arrest of drug lord Edgar "La Barbie" Valdez Villarreal in Mexico last week illustrates the good, the bad and the conundrum of President Felipe Calderon's war on cartels. Valdez was the third kingpin taken out of commission in less than a year and the first to be captured alive, offering an opportunity for intelligence-gathering on the multibillion-dollar drug smuggling business. Generally speaking, getting rid of crime bosses is good. It wreaks havoc on organizations that otherwise would be wholly focused on consolidating their formidable power; Valdez was nabbed in the midst of a bloody battle to succeed Arturo Beltran Leyva, who was killed by Mexican troops in December.
WORLD
December 22, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
The dead drug lord lay on his back, blood-soaked jeans yanked down to the knees. Mexican peso notes carpeted his bullet-torn body, and U.S. $100 bills formed neat rows next to his bared belly. The gory photograph of Arturo Beltran Leyva, one of Mexico's most wanted kingpins, was among those widely published here during the last few days following his death in a shootout Wednesday with Mexican marines in Cuernavaca, capital of the central state of Morelos. Even in a country where pictures of gruesome crime scenes routinely show up on the front pages of newspapers, the Beltran Leyva images have stirred controversy over who staged the tableau and whether Mexican authorities did so to send a taunting message to the rest of his powerful drug trafficking gang.
WORLD
April 20, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
In the latest in a string of brazen attacks by drug traffickers, gunmen ambushed a prisoner transfer convoy in western Mexico, killing eight officers in an attempt to free a high-level cartel member, police said. At least 20 assailants fired in three gun barrages Saturday on the column of vehicles as it raced between an airport and a prison in the Pacific coast state of Nayarit, police said. Police said it was a well-planned attack intended to free Jeronimo Gamez, cousin of Arturo Beltran Leyva, the reputed leader of one of Mexico's top cartels.
WORLD
January 3, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Mexican federal police Saturday announced the capture of Carlos Beltran Leyva, an alleged major drug trafficker whose brother, cartel leader Arturo Beltran Leyva, was killed in a shootout with Mexican marines last month. The capture of Carlos Beltran Leyva is a potentially significant gain for authorities because of the intelligence he could provide and because it further weakens one of Mexico's leading and most violent drug-smuggling organizations. Beltran Leyva was captured Wednesday in Culiacan, capital of Sinaloa state, which is an illicit drug center and birthplace of the Beltran Leyvas, along with many of Mexico's top traffickers.
WORLD
December 16, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
The leader of one of Mexico's most notorious drug cartels was killed during a shootout with Mexican forces Wednesday, authorities said. Arturo Beltran Leyva, who heads a Sinaloa-based gang, died along with four gunmen during a gunfight with Mexican navy forces in the city of Cuernavaca, south of Mexico City, the navy said in a statement. One of the gunmen committed suicide during the clash. The Beltran Leyva group has been singled out by U.S. authorities as a major trafficker of cocaine into the United States.
WORLD
September 1, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
This time, Mexican authorities took their prey alive. Monday's bloodless capture of Edgar Valdez Villarreal, a fair-haired Texan accused of helping run a murderous drug-trafficking gang in Mexico, could yield more breakthroughs by giving Mexican and U.S. authorities a deeper look into the workings of Mexico's drug underworld, analysts said Tuesday. In addition, Valdez's status as an American citizen may ease his possible handover to the United States, where he is wanted on cocaine-smuggling charges, by allowing authorities to skip or shorten the often-lengthy extradition process.
OPINION
September 7, 2010
The arrest of drug lord Edgar "La Barbie" Valdez Villarreal in Mexico last week illustrates the good, the bad and the conundrum of President Felipe Calderon's war on cartels. Valdez was the third kingpin taken out of commission in less than a year and the first to be captured alive, offering an opportunity for intelligence-gathering on the multibillion-dollar drug smuggling business. Generally speaking, getting rid of crime bosses is good. It wreaks havoc on organizations that otherwise would be wholly focused on consolidating their formidable power; Valdez was nabbed in the midst of a bloody battle to succeed Arturo Beltran Leyva, who was killed by Mexican troops in December.
WORLD
September 2, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Fresh off this week's capture of a notorious drug lord, Mexican President Felipe Calderon declared Wednesday that his sustained assault on organized crime and efforts to clean up the police were paying off. In the president's annual state of the nation report, delivered in writing to Congress, Calderon cited a string of drug kingpins arrested or killed during the last year as evidence of success in his nearly 4-year-old offensive against the...
WORLD
September 1, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
This time, Mexican authorities took their prey alive. Monday's bloodless capture of Edgar Valdez Villarreal, a fair-haired Texan accused of helping run a murderous drug-trafficking gang in Mexico, could yield more breakthroughs by giving Mexican and U.S. authorities a deeper look into the workings of Mexico's drug underworld, analysts said Tuesday. In addition, Valdez's status as an American citizen may ease his possible handover to the United States, where he is wanted on cocaine-smuggling charges, by allowing authorities to skip or shorten the often-lengthy extradition process.
WORLD
August 30, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Mexico announced the capture Monday of one of its most wanted alleged drug lords, a Texas-born figure accused of unleashing a wave of brutal slayings near Mexico City as part of a ruthless battle with rivals. Edgar Valdez Villarreal, also known by the improbable nickname "La Barbie," was seized by federal police in the state of Mexico, the region surrounding Mexico City, the Public Security Ministry said in a statement. Valdez allegedly served as the top enforcer for Arturo Beltran Leyva, a major kingpin killed by Mexican marines in December.
OPINION
August 14, 2010
More than 28,000 people have died in Mexican President Felipe Calderon's nearly four-year war against drug cartels. The government of Mexico says a majority of those killed were traffickers, dealers and their associates, including kingpins Arturo Beltran Leyva in 2009 and Ignacio "Nacho" Coronel Villarreal last month. According to the U.S. State Department's International Narcotics Control Strategy report issued in March, removing such important cartel leaders has "narrowed the operating space of criminal gangs, who are now fighting among themselves for diminishing territory and profits.
WORLD
April 20, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
Bodies are turning up in piles, hanging from overpasses, chopped up and thrown together in trash bags dumped by the roadside. This is not Ciudad Juarez, the violence-battered Mexican city along the Texas border. This is the central state of Morelos, a normally quiet region known by many Americans as home to Spanish-language schools in the city of Cuernavaca. Violence has increased in recent months, often in spectacularly grisly ways, due to a battle for control of the drug-trafficking operation once run by Arturo Beltran Leyva, who was slain by troops during a raid in Cuernavaca in December.
WORLD
April 14, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
The death toll from the Mexican government's three-year war on drug cartels is far higher than previously reported -- more than 22,000, according to news reports published Tuesday that cited confidential government figures. The figure is significantly higher than tallies assembled by Mexican media. They estimate that more than 18,000 people have died since President Felipe Calderon launched a crackdown against drug-trafficking groups after taking office in December 2006. The unofficial media tallies have often been cited by foreign news outlets, including The Times.
WORLD
April 20, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
Bodies are turning up in piles, hanging from overpasses, chopped up and thrown together in trash bags dumped by the roadside. This is not Ciudad Juarez, the violence-battered Mexican city along the Texas border. This is the central state of Morelos, a normally quiet region known by many Americans as home to Spanish-language schools in the city of Cuernavaca. Violence has increased in recent months, often in spectacularly grisly ways, due to a battle for control of the drug-trafficking operation once run by Arturo Beltran Leyva, who was slain by troops during a raid in Cuernavaca in December.
OPINION
August 14, 2010
More than 28,000 people have died in Mexican President Felipe Calderon's nearly four-year war against drug cartels. The government of Mexico says a majority of those killed were traffickers, dealers and their associates, including kingpins Arturo Beltran Leyva in 2009 and Ignacio "Nacho" Coronel Villarreal last month. According to the U.S. State Department's International Narcotics Control Strategy report issued in March, removing such important cartel leaders has "narrowed the operating space of criminal gangs, who are now fighting among themselves for diminishing territory and profits.
WORLD
January 3, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Mexican federal police Saturday announced the capture of Carlos Beltran Leyva, an alleged major drug trafficker whose brother, cartel leader Arturo Beltran Leyva, was killed in a shootout with Mexican marines last month. The capture of Carlos Beltran Leyva is a potentially significant gain for authorities because of the intelligence he could provide and because it further weakens one of Mexico's leading and most violent drug-smuggling organizations. Beltran Leyva was captured Wednesday in Culiacan, capital of Sinaloa state, which is an illicit drug center and birthplace of the Beltran Leyvas, along with many of Mexico's top traffickers.
WORLD
December 23, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The young marine received the highest military honors that the Mexican state could offer. Killed during a raid that ended the life of a notorious drug lord, the marine was buried a hero, ushered to his grave by an honor guard of commandos in camouflage, his mother awarded a folded flag. Hours later, the grieving mother, the marine's sister, his brother and an aunt were mowed down by gunmen in a revenge attack that sent a chilling message to the Mexican military combating drug traffickers.
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