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Aryan Nations Organization

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Draped in orange and black hooded robes, the two men lead a group in prayer, raise their arms in a Nazi salute and then kneel to set fire to an 18-foot wooden cross. With a huge Confederate flag flapping in the night breeze, 15 men chant "Hail, victory" as, eventually, three crosses wrapped in kerosene-soaked burlap are ignited in a grassy field in the foothills above the San Fernando Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2002 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Aryan Nations group that booked a La Habra Moose Lodge for a party today says publicity has forced it to move the event. A man who answered the phone at the number listed on the white-supremacist group's Web site said Friday the event was canceled after the location was revealed. He said a new location was being sought. He would not give his name or other details.
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NEWS
October 29, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bedraggled but defiant under a light rain, Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler and two dozen supporters carried banners and swastika flags through the streets Saturday, vowing that northern Idaho will remain a haven for the white race. Facing a $6.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
For 27 years, Norm Gissel never could have made it past the guard shack at the Aryan Nations headquarters. Now he and other human-rights activists roam the 20-acre compound as if they own the place. That's because they do own it--the result of a lawsuit that bankrupted Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler--and this week they are savoring the demolition of what they call "the campus of hate."
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Angry citizens in Pulaski, the birthplace of the Ku Klux Klan, closed their businesses Saturday and bedecked the town with orange ribbons in silent protest to a march by 200 white supremacists. "Our protest is to turn our back on them. We're shunning them to let them know they don't have a welcome mat here," said Bob Henry, a leader of Pulaski's show of solidarity against the rally by the Aryan Nations. "We think brotherhood is better than prejudice."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Freedom of speech and freedom of hate and prejudice are colliding on the airwaves here. Consider this: "Aryan Nations Hour"--a weekly stage for white supremacists--debuts Dec. 5 on tiny KZZI-AM (1510) on your radio dial. The Saturday morning call-in program will be closely aligned with Aryan Nations, a neo-Nazi group with headquarters in Hayden Lake, Ida., and plans to open an office in Salt Lake City or Ogden, where the bulk of the state's black population lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1988
A local American Nazi Party official was convicted Wednesday of unlawful assembly and illegally possessing a billy club at a 1983 cross burning in a predominantly black neighborhood in Lake View Terrace. Stanley Witek, 54, of Los Angeles faces up to three years in prison when he is sentenced Dec. 7 for his part in the ceremony at which three 15-foot crosses were burned as a gesture of unity among three white supremacist groups, the Ku Klux Klan, American Nazi Party and Aryan Nations.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Aryan Nations compound that for 20 years spawned some of the nation's most violent neo-Nazis was sold to a mother and son whose lawsuit bankrupted the group. Victoria and Jason Keenan were the only bidders in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court sale of the 20-acre property near Hayden Lake. The Keenans paid $250,000 and plan to sell the wooded property, possibly to a human rights group. As the major creditors of the Aryan Nations, the Keenans would be in line to get the money back.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In a blow to hate groups that have made the Northwest their clubhouse, the founder of the Aryan Nations has agreed to give up his Idaho compound to satisfy a $6.3-million verdict against the white supremacist organization. Richard Butler, 82, has agreed to hand over the 20-acre property no later than Oct. 25. Under the agreement, he must also give up the property's contents--Nazi and Confederate flags, Third Reich posters, a silver bust of Adolf Hitler and stained glass swastikas.
NEWS
December 10, 1987
Utah Gov. Norman H. Bangerter, Salt Lake City Mayor Palmer DePaulis and the Mormon Church issued separate denunciations of the Aryan Nations. Aryan Nations leader, Richard Butler, announced several months ago he planned to open a regional office in Ogden, Salt Lake City or Provo next spring. Since then, there have been several demonstrations in the state against the group.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Aryan Nations compound that for 20 years spawned some of the nation's most violent neo-Nazis was sold to a mother and son whose lawsuit bankrupted the group. Victoria and Jason Keenan were the only bidders in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court sale of the 20-acre property near Hayden Lake. The Keenans paid $250,000 and plan to sell the wooded property, possibly to a human rights group. As the major creditors of the Aryan Nations, the Keenans would be in line to get the money back.
NEWS
October 29, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bedraggled but defiant under a light rain, Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler and two dozen supporters carried banners and swastika flags through the streets Saturday, vowing that northern Idaho will remain a haven for the white race. Facing a $6.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In a blow to hate groups that have made the Northwest their clubhouse, the founder of the Aryan Nations has agreed to give up his Idaho compound to satisfy a $6.3-million verdict against the white supremacist organization. Richard Butler, 82, has agreed to hand over the 20-acre property no later than Oct. 25. Under the agreement, he must also give up the property's contents--Nazi and Confederate flags, Third Reich posters, a silver bust of Adolf Hitler and stained glass swastikas.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A defense lawyer sought a new trial for the white supremacist Aryan Nations, which could lose all its assets as a result of a $6.3-million civil judgment. Edgar Steele, who represents the group and its leader, Richard Butler, argued that his clients did not receive a fair trial before the Sept. 7 verdict. Among other things, the motion alleges juror misconduct.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
Aryan Nations leader Richard Butler vowed Saturday that he will not leave northern Idaho, despite a $6.3-million judgment against his organization. At a news conference on the 20-acre Aryan Nations compound, Butler said he did not have the $960,000 cash bond that would be required for him to appeal the judgment issued Thursday by a civil jury. But he said his neo-Nazi sect would continue, even if, as he expects, the compound is seized to pay the judgment.
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
A lawyer for a mother and son who were attacked as they drove past the Aryan Nations' headquarters asked jurors Wednesday to award $11.26 million in damages. After six days of testimony, lawyer Morris Dees asked the jury to "send a message" to hate groups across the nation. Dees, of the Montgomery, Ala.-based Southern Poverty Law Center, suggested the jury award $1.26-million in compensatory damages and $10 million in punitive damages.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | Associated Press
The jury reached a verdict Wednesday on one charge in the trial of 13 white supremacists, and the judge ordered more deliberations on two other counts despite the jurors' contention they were deadlocked. The jury said it reached a verdict on the charge of conspiracy to assassinate two federal officials, which had been brought against five of the defendants in the trial.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A defense lawyer sought a new trial for the white supremacist Aryan Nations, which could lose all its assets as a result of a $6.3-million civil judgment. Edgar Steele, who represents the group and its leader, Richard Butler, argued that his clients did not receive a fair trial before the Sept. 7 verdict. Among other things, the motion alleges juror misconduct.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Aryan Nations white supremacist group was negligent in the operation of its security force, U.S. District Judge Charles W. Hosack ruled. The move clears the way for a Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, jury to assess punitive and compensatory damages should it side with plaintiffs Victoria Keenan and her son, Jason, in their civil rights case against the group. The Keenans are seeking unspecified damages for a 1998 incident in which they say they were assaulted by Aryan Nations security guards.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Aryan Nations leader Richard Butler conceded Friday that he is the absolute authority at the white supremacist sect's headquarters but said he had no knowledge of his security guards' actions when they shot at and assaulted a woman and her son. Butler's testimony began the final day of plaintiffs' witnesses in Victoria and Jason Keenan's civil rights case against Butler and his Aryan Nations church. The defense is expected to begin laying out its case Tuesday.
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