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Ascon Properties

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1989
A federal appeals court Tuesday ruled that Ascon Properties should be allowed to resume its lawsuit seeking about $250 million in compensation for cleanup of Ascon's 37-acre property, a former dump site, near Edison High School. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco reinstated Ascon's lawsuit against Mobil Oil Co. and 11 other oil and trucking companies, which Ascon alleges dumped petroleum-drilling wastes and some hazardous materials at the property from 1938 to 1972.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1989 | NANCY WRIDE, Times Staff Writer
The beleaguered owners of a contaminated landfill in Huntington Beach covered a 48-foot-wide toxic pit on the property Thursday to stifle a stench that has bothered neighbors for decades. As a result, Ascon Properties also moved one step closer toward final settlement of a $7-million lawsuit filed 19 months ago by state health and anti-pollution agencies seeking cleanup of the site. The company's lender has foreclosed on the property. As Ascon Vice President John Lindsey stood beside the sump, workers laid final touches on a round, black rubberized sheet that will keep the highly toxic pond of styrene-type ooze protected from the sun and other elements.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1989 | NANCY WRIDE, Times Staff Writer
The beleaguered owners of a contaminated landfill in Huntington Beach covered a 48-foot-wide toxic pit on the property Thursday to stifle a stench that has bothered neighbors for decades. As a result, Ascon Properties also moved one step closer toward final settlement of a $7-million lawsuit filed 19 months ago by state health and anti-pollution agencies seeking cleanup of the site. The company's lender has foreclosed on the property. As Ascon Vice President John Lindsey stood beside the sump, workers laid final touches on a round, black rubberized sheet that will keep the highly toxic pond of styrene-type ooze protected from the sun and other elements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1989
A federal appeals court Tuesday ruled that Ascon Properties should be allowed to resume its lawsuit seeking about $250 million in compensation for cleanup of Ascon's 37-acre property, a former dump site, near Edison High School. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco reinstated Ascon's lawsuit against Mobil Oil Co. and 11 other oil and trucking companies, which Ascon alleges dumped petroleum-drilling wastes and some hazardous materials at the property from 1938 to 1972.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1989 | NANCY WRIDE, Times Staff Writer
Ascon Properties moved one step closer Tuesday night to building hundreds of condominiums on its contaminated former landfill behind Edison High School. The Huntington Beach City Council voted 4 to 3 in favor of a General Plan amendment changing the property's designated land use from public, quasi-public and institutional to residential, with the possibility of up to 600 condominiums. The actual number of condominiums will be decided later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1989
The information for this listing was unavailable for several months. The South Coast Air Quality Management District has responsibility to control air pollution in the area. It has the power to seek court-imposed fines against polluters of from $25 to $25,000 a day based on such factors as the extent that emissions exceed legal limits, the potential danger to the public, whether the violation was intentional, accidental or due to negligence and the company's history of violations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1987 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
Toxic, hazardous wastes in the Ascon landfill in Huntington Beach pose a serious public health threat, so the owners should be ordered to clean it up, state pollution officials said Friday. People who chronically inhale the increasingly strong odors are threatened with nausea, eye and skin problems, general weakness and respiratory tract irritation, according to an Orange County Superior Court lawsuit, filed by the South Coast Air Quality Management District.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Mathewson has some hungry bugs that he thinks can save businesses lots of money. Not all businesses, to be sure--only those which find themselves facing a problem that's increasingly prevalent in Orange County and around the country: soil and water contamination. Mathewson and his small Huntington Beach-based company, Protek Environmental, specialize in cleaning up toxic-waste problems with an army of chemical-eating microorganisms, a process known as bioremediation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1992 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Starting next week, work crews will begin hauling out tons of hazardous waste buried at the former Ascon landfill, officials said Thursday. The $25-million cleanup effort has been in the planning stages for seven years, and is expected to take 18 months to complete, said Allan Hirsch, spokesman for the state Department of Toxic Substances Control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1987 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A judge Wednesday ordered a partial cleanup of the Ascon landfill in Huntington Beach, calling for one pit there to be capped within two weeks. Acting at the request of state health and anti-pollution agencies, Orange County Superior Court Judge Tully H. Seymour signed a preliminary injunction against Ascon Properties Inc., the firm that owns the site.
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