Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAshes
IN THE NEWS

Ashes

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2009
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By David Zucchino
MONCURE, N.C. - While poring over regulatory documents for Duke Energy coal ash ponds, environmentalists at the Waterkeeper Alliance grew suspicious of the way the giant utility was handling the toxic ash waste left over from burning coal. They decided to send up a team in an aircraft to photograph Duke's shuttered Cape Fear coal-burning power plant and ash ponds, tucked into piney woods in this tiny community in central North Carolina. The photos revealed what the Waterkeeper Alliance says is evidence that Duke, the nation's largest electric utility, is deliberately pumping toxic coal ash wastewater from the containment ponds into a canal that eventually feeds into the Cape Fear River, a source of drinking water for downstream cities.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1998
Ashes to ashes, but what then? California is the only state that prohibits individuals from distributing the cremated remains of a loved one either on land or at sea within three miles of the shoreline. The choice: to deposit the ashes in an approved cemetery "scattering ground," hire an officially certified "cremated remains disposer" or just violate the law.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2014 | By David Zucchino
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. - After weeks of downplaying a massive coal ash spill, North Carolina regulators issued violation notices Monday to five more Duke Energy power plants, in addition to two citations late last week at the site that polluted the Dan River a month ago. Also Monday, the state Department of Environment and Natural Resources described the Feb. 2 spill as an “environmental disaster.” The latest five citations focused on Duke...
NEWS
May 30, 1998 | Times Wire Services
Michael Anthony Horne has sued San Antonio for unspecified damages after police jailed him on charges of possession of methamphetamine. What he actually possessed was the ashes of his cremated grandmother. After police said a field test showed the presence of the drug, Horne was hauled away to jail for a month. Unable to make bail, he lost his job, his pickup, his apartment and his military reserve status, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2009
WORLD
January 21, 2012 | By Jung-yoon Choi, Los Angeles Times
When Jeon Gyeong-suk lost her husband to cancer three months ago, she agonized over how to keep his remains. Because land is at a premium, burial was out, and she found the idea of a heap of ashes stored in an urn sort of creepy. So the 51-year-old widow paid $900 to transform her husband's ashes into a few handfuls of tiny bluish beads that have the look of beluga caviar. Even though the beads look like pebble-sized gems, they aren't meant to be strung into a necklace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013 | By Jason Wells
What was supposed to be a day of closure for Melvin Hayes turned out to be another chapter of grief Thursday when his car was stolen at an Elk Grove carwash -- with his wife's ashes still in the backseat. Hayes, 80, is now more concerned about getting his wife's ashes back than he is the red 2011 Ford Fusion. “Someone could dump my wife's ashes in the Sacramento River, or dumpster, or down the sewer,” he told CBS Sacramento . “I don't want that to happen to my wife's ashes.” Hayes and his wife, Annamarie, would have celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Two things British television does extremely well are period pieces and mysteries. And here come a couple now. "Foyle's War" returns to PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery!" with three new feature-length episodes Sunday night. Though the production was on hiatus for a couple of years, the action — set mainly in and around the English seaside town of Hastings — picks up just where it left off: Previous seasons of "Foyle's" got us through World War II; now we are in its immediate aftermath, a period of settling and resetting, of cleaning up the various bits of nasty business that keep Detective Chief Superintendent Christopher Foyle, played by Michael Kitchen, still doing the job he has for some time been trying to leave.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Michael McGough
In Pittsburgh, where I was born and lived for most of my life, Ash Wednesday was a powerful reminder of just how Catholic that city was. On the first day of Lent, downtown streets and office buildings teemed with people with dusky foreheads, a kind of religious census by smudge. But ashes aren't just for Roman Catholics anymore . When I emerged from the Foggy Bottom Metro station Wednesday morning, I encountered a bishop in miter and flowing purple cope affixing ashes to passersby, a reminder to them that from dust they came and to dust they will return.  I knew it wasn't a Roman Catholic rite because the bishop was a woman, the Rt. Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde of the Washington Episcopal Diocese.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By David Zucchino
DURHAM, N.C. -- Nearly a month after a massive coal ash spill at a Duke Energy plant contaminated the Dan River, state regulators in North Carolina announced late Friday that they have cited Duke for violations of environmental laws. The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources has been accused by environmental groups for failing to take action against Duke Energy and cooperating too closely with the giant utility in dealing with the Feb. 2 spill. In a news release issued at 6 p.m. Friday, the agency said it had issued notices of violation against Duke Energy earlier in the day for its handling of a 27-acre coal ash basin at a retired Duke coal-fired plant on the Dan River near North Carolina's border with Virginia.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By David Zucchino
RALEIGH, N.C. -- A second ruptured stormwater pipe that has been spilling toxic coal ash into the Dan River in North Carolina and Virginia has been sealed,  North Carolina officials announced late Friday. The state's Department of Environment and Natural Resources said Duke Energy, whose coal ash containment basin in Eden, N.C., is the source of the ash, managed to block the discharge with a concrete plug. The 36-inch pipe has been leaking coal ash since since approximately Feb. 14, spilling arsenic and other heavy metals into the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014
John Henson Son of Muppets founder Jim Henson John Henson, 48, who occasionally performed as a puppeteer in the famed Muppets troupe his father founded, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in Saugerties, New York. He did not have a history of heart trouble, his sister Cheryl said. His father, Jim Henson, died at age 53 of pneumonia in 1990. John Henson sometimes performed as Sweetums, a large, hairy Muppet who towered over other puppets and humans. Henson played the character for a while at the Muppet*Vision 3D attraction at Disney World, where near the end of the show he would suddenly run into the audience to screams of delight from fans, said Brian Jay Jones, whose Jim Henson biography was published last year.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2014 | By David Zucchino
DURHAM, N.C. - North Carolina's environmental regulatory agency is under federal criminal investigation for its handling of a massive toxic coal ash spill into the Dan River near the Virginia border. The U.S. attorney's office in Raleigh issued a subpoena Monday that includes 13 separate requests for documents from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources related to Duke Energy and the spill, which was discovered Feb. 2. Tons of toxic heavy metals from a containment basin spilled into the river.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2014 | By David Zucchino
RALEIGH, N.C. - State regulators in North Carolina have asked a judge to delay what environmentalists claim is a sweetheart deal with Duke Energy designed to protect the nation's largest electrical utility from heavy fines for allowing coal ash into the state's rivers. The move came a week after a massive spill dumped up to 82,000 tons of toxic coal ash into the Dan River from a Duke Energy containment basin at a shuttered coal-fired plant in Eden, N.C. Duke and state regulators have downplayed the severity of the spill.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2014 | David Zucchino
Pete Harrison dipped his kayak paddle into a gray stain on the bank of the murky Dan River. He pulled out a sticky gob 4 inches thick. "That's pure coal ash," he said. Harrison, a lawyer with the Riverkeeper Alliance, was kayaking the river Thursday to take water samples, four days after a massive plume of coal ash laced with toxic chemicals spilled into the river from a storage basin at a retired coal-fired power plant operated by Duke Energy. Environmentalists and the nation's largest electric utility seem to describe two different rivers in the wake of the third-largest coal ash spill in U.S. history.
WORLD
January 15, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Thieves who attempted to steal a priceless Greek urn containing the cremated remains of Sigmund Freud from its resting place in London failed to make off with the ashes but badly damaged the 2,300-year-old receptacle, Scotland Yard said Wednesday. The botched break-in occurred on New Year's Day at a crypt preserving and displaying the remains of artists, intellectuals and political leaders who span the social spectrum, from wartime capitulator Neville Chamberlain to doomed songstress Amy Winehouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Veronica Rocha
The cremated ashes of an 87-year-old Burbank woman were stolen from a minivan parked outside the home of relatives who had planned a memorial gathering this weekend for the woman. The ashes of Lois LaRocco, who died in late August due to complications from Alzheimer's disease, were contained in a navy blue leather urn that had been left overnight in a minivan as family members prepared for the memorial gathering and wrestled with how to discuss the urn with the woman's grandchildren.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By David Zucchino
EDEN, N.C. - An environmental group Thursday challenged Duke Energy's assurances that drinking water from the Dan River in North Carolina and Virginia remained safe despite a massive spill of toxic coal ash that released a deluge of murky gray sludge into the river Sunday. The Waterkeeper Alliance said its tests of water collected just yards from the spill site here showed dangerous level of toxins, including arsenic, chromium, lead, iron and other heavy metals. Arsenic levels in the samples were 35 times higher than the maximum containment level set by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water, the group said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|