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OPINION
June 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Chen
Any day now, the Supreme Court will announce its decision in the Fisher vs. University of Texas case, which could invalidate the use of race-conscious policies in college admissions. Some Asian American groups, such as the 80-20 Education Foundation, have been among the most vocal and visible in opposing what's broadly termed affirmative action. They believe getting rid of race considerations will work to the advantage of Asian Americans, who on average have held more extracurricular leadership positions and have higher test scores and grade-point averages than whites, yet have the lowest acceptance rate to elite private universities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
California's immigrant-heavy economy looks strong through the lens of regional bank results, with two of Los Angeles' many Asian American banks near the top of analysts' national lists of bank stocks that investors should buy. According to financial information provider SNL Financial, BBCN Bancorp recently held the No. 2 slot, with six of seven analysts, or 87%, rating Koreatown's largest bank a "buy" or "outperform," meaning it would do better than...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three decades ago, Paul Kim was a 15-year-old immigrant from South Korea who barely spoke English; he was living in a small Oklahoma town and wondering what future America held for him. This week, Kim, 44, whose Korean name Myung-Chun means "bright sky," was named a captain in the Los Angeles Police Department--the first Asian to achieve that rank in the city's history.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
Two of Los Angeles' many Asian American banks ranked near the top of analysts' national lists of bank stocks that investors should buy, a signal of economic strength in local immigrant communities. Financial information provider SNL Financial ranked BBCN Bancorp second of all bank stocks nationally, with six of seven analysts, or 87%, rating Koreatown's largest bank a "buy" or "outperform. " Only the parent of South Carolina Bank and Trust had a more positive endorsement from analysts.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Which Americans are least likely to be overweight or obese? Asian Americans, by a long shot. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that 38.6% of Asian American adults have a body mass index over 25, the threshold for being considered overweight. That's far below the 66.7% rate among whites, 76.7% rate among blacks and 78.8% rate among Latinos. Some Asian American adults are more likely to be overweight than others. For instance, 43% of men have a BMI over 25, compared with 34.7% of women.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Much has been made of the Latino vote and its crucial role in boosting President Obama to victory, but it was Asian Americans who made the most dramatic shift in support for the president Tuesday. Exit polls show that 73% of Asian Americans backed Obama, an 11-point increase since 2008.  Asian Americans came out in such force for Obama that they topped Latinos as his second-most supportive ethnic group, behind African Americans. Latinos, who made up 10% of the electorate, went 67% for Obama, 5 points higher than in 2008.
OPINION
November 23, 2012 | By Taeku Lee and Karthick Ramakrishnan
As the dust settles on the presidential election, there seems to be a new theory daily as to why Mitt Romney lost and what it signals for the future of the Republican Party. Common to nearly all the speculation are the partisan implications of demographic change. The United States is shifting gradually toward a majority-minority electorate, with ever-growing numbers of Latino and Asian American voters. Notably, these groups are increasingly voting as Democrats. According to exit polls from Nov. 6, 73% of Asian Americans and 71% of Latinos voted for President Obama.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Hector Becerra
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - They may be the fastest-growing and best-educated racial group, boasting the highest average income in the country, but when it comes to politics, Asian Americans have historically spent little time in the political spotlight of either the Democrats or Republicans . But on Monday, a group of leaders at the Asian American and Pacific Islander caucus meeting at the Democratic National Convention said they see signs of...
OPINION
June 23, 2012
Re "Asians nation's fastest-growing group," June 19 The Asian Pacific American, or APA, community is represented as a "model minority," much as it was portrayed in a recent Pew Research Center study that your article cites. However, your article failed to properly address the disparities that exist between and within subgroups of the APA community or the widespread criticisms about the Pew study. The APA umbrella includes more than 45 distinct ethnicities speaking more than 100 language dialects, and many of the groups that were excluded from Pew's report are also the ones with the greatest needs.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- The Marine Corps on Wednesday began an advertising campaign targeted toward encouraging enlistment by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, two groups that make up only a tiny percentage of the Corps. The campaign, entitled "A Warrior's Education," features videos on the Marines' Facebook page in which 1st Lt. David Pham and 1st Lt. David Oliver David extol the virtues and challenges of being a Marine officer, and link Marine discipline to the values they learned from their families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By a Times Staff Writer
For the first time,  the number of Latinos from California offered freshman admission to the University of California was larger than that for whites. Reflecting demographic trends, 28.8% of those admitted to at least one UC campus were Latino, compared with 26.8% white. At 36.2%, Asian Americans again made up the largest ethnic group among admitted students from California. Blacks from California were just 4.2%, a number that officials said was disturbingly low. "It remains a difficult issue for the university," said Stephen Handel, UC's associate vice president for undergraduate admissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | Larry Gordon and Carla Rivera
California high school seniors faced a tougher time winning a freshman spot at most of the UC campuses for the fall, with their chances at UCLA and UC Berkeley now fewer than one in five, according to a report released Friday. Six of UC's nine undergraduate campuses accepted a smaller number of California students than last year even though the number of applicants rose. Competition was fiercest at UCLA, where only 16.3% of state students were admitted, down from 17.4% last year, and at UC Berkeley, where 18.8% were accepted, compared with 21.4% last year.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By Lanhee J. Chen
The recent defeat of an effort to reinstitute affirmative action in admissions to California's public colleges and universities demonstrates the political power of Asian American voters and challenges the conventional wisdom about their partisan loyalties. The defeat is a reminder that Asian Americans can have a decisive impact on political and policymaking processes. Perhaps more important, it suggests that if education is a key issue that drives Asian American voters, the Democratic Party may not be able to reliably count on their support in the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
In his first night on the air since a campaign to #CancelColbert erupted on Twitter Thursday night, Stephen Colbert spent nearly his entire show Monday night responding to charges of racial insensitivity.  For anyone who missed out on the brouhaha, it all began Thursday evening when "The Colbert Report's" Twitter account quoted a joke from a segment on Wednesday's episode of the show that mocked Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder for...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - When the state Senate took up the issue of affirmative action in late January, it was a relatively tepid affair. After 20 minutes of polite debate, senators passed a measure that, if approved by voters, would overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public higher education. But within weeks, the debate turned fractious. Backlash arose among some Asian Americans who feared their children could lose access to the state's universities if more places were granted to students from other minority groups.
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | By Christopher Reynolds
These might be the best, busiest, most complex weeks of the year in our house, and it's all because of two threads. One red, one green. The most important is the red one - the cultural tether that stretches back to Chengdu, China, where our daughter, Grace, was born in 2004. Grace was 13 months old when my wife, Mary Frances, and I arrived to adopt her and bring her home to Los Angeles. In our early days as a triple-A (Asian American by adoption) family, I thought we might face some cultural barriers, draw stares, confuse people.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Some staggering new figures about Asian American consumers are out this month: Their buying power is up 523% since 1990, reaching $718.4 billion this year. If the demographic were a nation, it'd be the 18th-largest economy in the world. Within five years, Asian American buying power will surge over $1 trillion, according to a report this month from Nielsen. At the moment, 28% of households in the group have annual incomes greater than $100,000, compared with 18% of all Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
Michael Wahl is aware that he has a choice - President Obama or Mitt Romney. "It's either this guy or that guy," the Cal Poly Pomona sophomore says. But he didn't know about the candidates lower on the ballot, or the measures that could shape California's future - until volunteers came to his ethnic studies class one evening with a video aimed at convincing Asian Americans to turn out on election day. Wahl, who is half-Chinese, is among the thousands of prospective voters targeted in what is probably the most aggressive push yet to unlock the Asian vote in Southern California.
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By Karthick Ramakrishnan
Is the debate on affirmative action versus race-blind policies mainly about principle, or mostly about preserving narrow group interests? We are beginning to find out in California. A bill passed by the state Senate and pending in the Assembly would put a constitutional amendment on the ballot that would overturn portions of Proposition 209 to exempt public college and university admissions from the ban on racial, ethnic and gender preferences. There are principled reasons to support as well as to oppose affirmative action in higher education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Anh Do
Police and Santa Ana city officials said Friday they don't believe the slaying of Kim Pham outside a local nightclub was a hate crime. The mayor of the predominantly Latino city urged Vietnamese American residents to remain calm. "We don't see this as a hate or gang crime," said Mayor Miguel Pulido, who added that he considers the altercation to be "an isolated incident. " Police have arrested a second woman and are looking for a third in connection with Pham's death.
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