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Asian Elephant

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1991 | BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Omar, the 8-month-old elephant rejected by his mother at birth, was battling a mysterious, life-threatening infection Tuesday at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, park officials said. The elephant showed small signs of improvement Tuesday afternoon, drinking baby formula and standing on his wobbly legs for the first time in several days, park staff said. Veterinarians and park staff were keeping a 24-hour watch over the 560-pound baby, keeping him "warm and quiet" in a hay-filled barn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1990 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators at the Humane Society of the United States sent a letter Wednesday to the San Diego Zoo charging that its elephant exhibit is inadequate and "extremely dangerous" for both the huge mammals and their keepers. The letter to Doug Meyers, the director of the San Diego Zoological Society, was prompted by the death Sunday of Maya, a 51-year-old Asian elephant that was put to death after she fell into a moat and crippled herself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
A 51-year-old elephant at the San Diego Zoo had to be put to death because of injuries she suffered after falling headfirst into a concrete moat, officials said. Maya, an Asian elephant who was the oldest mammal at the zoo, apparently suffered torn ligaments in her legs Sunday as she tried to climb out of the moat surrounding her enclosure, said zoo spokesman Jeff Jouett.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Connie was the first to test the waters, delicately dipping the tip of her trunk into the murky water, much as a person might put in a toe to check the temperature. She trumpeted loudly. Then, finally, Connie took the plunge. She was the bravest of the San Diego Wild Animal Park's seven female Asian elephants, edging up cautiously to their plush new pool shortly after being released into the compound Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1990
Officials at the San Diego Wild Animal Park are continuing efforts to reunite an Asian elephant calf born Wednesday with his mother, but the prospects appear slim. "Right now we have pretty much resigned ourselves to hand-rearing," said Tom Hanscom, a spokesman for the park. The longer the elephants remain separated, the slimmer the chances are that baby Omar will nurse from his mother, Connie, Hanscom said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1990 | DAN PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A newborn Asian elephant at the San Diego Wild Animal Park had to be separated from his mother shortly after birth Wednesday, leading keepers to worry whether the valuable young pachyderm will survive. "The calf bellowed and scared the mom, and so Mom began to kick, stomp and try to kill the baby," said Tom Hanscom, a spokesman for the park. "At that point, the keepers physically placed themselves between Mom and the baby."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1989 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veterinary surgeons Monday performed the first-ever Cesarean section on an elephant, removing a dead fetus in an attempt to save the life of the mother, a 7,000-pound pachyderm more than 70 days overdue. Jean, a 19-year-old Asian elephant at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, was revived just five minutes after the 4-hour, 5-minute operation was complete, and park officials expressed guarded optimism about her condition. "We didn't know if she'd make it.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Veterinarians at San Diego's Wild Animal Park were seeking the right equipment to check on the welfare of a fetus that has been in an elephant's womb for nearly two years. Jean, a 19-year-old Asian elephant, has been pregnant for 725 days, and veterinarians do not believe she will deliver a live fetus. But park officials said they need to know the status of the fetus before deciding whether to induce labor or allow nature to take its course.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An elephant entering her third year of pregnancy apparently has set a world record for a pachyderm gestation, but doubts are growing about the health of the fetus, anxious zookeepers said. Jean, a 19-year-old Asian elephant at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, was due to give birth to her first calf in August, after what would have been a normal 22-month pregnancy, a park spokesman said.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
An elephant entering her third year of pregnancy apparently has set a world's record for a pachyderm gestation, but doubts are growing about the health of the 200-pound fetus, anxious zookeepers said today. Jean, a 19-year-old Asian elephant at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, was due to give birth to her first calf in August, after what would have been a normal 22-month pregnancy, said park spokesman Tom Hanscom.
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