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Asian Pacific Family Center

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NEWS
April 25, 1993
Asian Pacific Family Center served 1,585 people in the past year, including clients from more than eight different ethnic groups, officials said this week. The ethnic breakdown of clients included Burmese, Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Malaysian and Vietnamese. The center, which provides counseling and other support services, assisted 759 children and teen-agers, including 129 in the child abuse program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2009 | By Ching-Ching Ni
Since she was a teenager, Stella Ho has wrestled with fainting spells, seizures and suicidal tendencies. Doctors in her native Hong Kong struggled to figure out what was wrong with her. She was unable to hold onto her job as an office clerk. Relatives ostracized her and kept her away from family functions. "They didn't realize I was sick," said Ho, 56. "They were afraid I would become a burden and disturb the family peace." Ho didn't really understand her condition either until she immigrated to the United States in 1988 and began seeking help from the Asian Pacific Family Center.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2009 | By Ching-Ching Ni
Since she was a teenager, Stella Ho has wrestled with fainting spells, seizures and suicidal tendencies. Doctors in her native Hong Kong struggled to figure out what was wrong with her. She was unable to hold onto her job as an office clerk. Relatives ostracized her and kept her away from family functions. "They didn't realize I was sick," said Ho, 56. "They were afraid I would become a burden and disturb the family peace." Ho didn't really understand her condition either until she immigrated to the United States in 1988 and began seeking help from the Asian Pacific Family Center.
NEWS
April 25, 1993
Asian Pacific Family Center served 1,585 people in the past year, including clients from more than eight different ethnic groups, officials said this week. The ethnic breakdown of clients included Burmese, Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Malaysian and Vietnamese. The center, which provides counseling and other support services, assisted 759 children and teen-agers, including 129 in the child abuse program.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
"My father was an immigrant," Monterey Park Police Capt. Joe Santoro said. "He came through Ellis Island from Italy. He once said to me: 'Son, it's easy to be a prince, if your father was a king.' " For people born in America, Santoro said, "it's easy to say, 'Be an American.' " At a hearing of the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations last week, a dozen speakers detailed the triumphs and failures faced by newcomers trying to become Americans in the San Gabriel Valley.
NEWS
April 15, 1990
Local leaders who have contributed significantly to the Asian Pacific community in the San Gabriel Valley will be honored at the third annual Asian Pacific Family Center's awards dinner Friday in Montebello. Guests will include county Supervisor Edmund D. Edelman, honorary chairman for the event, and Joanne Ishimine, KABC-TV anchorwoman, who will be the mistress of ceremonies.
NEWS
November 22, 1992
Thirteen service agencies dedicated to helping Asian-Americans will split $10,000 in donations from the Asian Pacific Community Fund. The grants are the first contribution from the 2-year-old Asian Fund, an organization that raises money for Asian service programs through employee contributions, much like the United Way. The 13 agencies receiving funds are the Asian American Drug Abuse Program, Asian Health Project/T.H.E.
NEWS
November 3, 1988
The United Way has awarded $164,000 for a project designed to help the growing numbers of young Asian immigrants who are having difficulty adjusting to life in the United States. The grant for the Asian Newcomer Youth Project represents the largest amount the United Way has ever given a program in the Asian community of Los Angeles County, according to Judy Chu, who heads the Asian Task Force of the United Way/San Gabriel Valley Region.
NEWS
March 9, 1989
With the opening of the Asian Newcomer Youth Project in Monterey Park, young immigrants from Asia now have a social services agency to assist them in the San Gabriel Valley. The United Way-sponsored program plans an open house on March 16 to introduce the project and its director, May L. To. For the last nine years she has been helping Asian refugees and immigrants in the region, most recently as executive assistant of the Chinatown Service Center.
NEWS
January 2, 1994
Thirteen service agencies that assist Asian Americans will split $20,000 in donations collected by the Asian Pacific Community Fund. The 3-year-old organization raises money for Asian American programs through employee contributions. Among the workplaces that contributed in 1993 were the county of Los Angeles, the city of Monterey Park, Lippo Bank, Southern California Gas Co. and Southern California Edison Co. Edison also provided a special grant of $10,000 to the fund.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
"My father was an immigrant," Monterey Park Police Capt. Joe Santoro said. "He came through Ellis Island from Italy. He once said to me: 'Son, it's easy to be a prince, if your father was a king.' " For people born in America, Santoro said, "it's easy to say, 'Be an American.' " At a hearing of the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations last week, a dozen speakers detailed the triumphs and failures faced by newcomers trying to become Americans in the San Gabriel Valley.
NEWS
September 30, 1993
School officials and the community will honor longtime Montebello school board member Eleanor Kim Chow with a dinner Friday to raise money for playground equipment. Chow, retiring after 23 years on the board, requested that her send-off receipts be used to furnish a kindergarten play area at Winter Gardens Elementary School in East Los Angeles. As a board member, Chow combined a motherly style with the hard-nosed determination and political savvy needed to push through policies that she favored.
NEWS
August 31, 1989
David Ma had grown weary of the negative publicity about racial and ethnic tensions in Monterey Park and the San Gabriel Valley. So, the Monterey Park businessman and Arcadia resident decided to counter that by organizing what he is calling "a song and dance salute to America's cultural harmony." On Sept. 9 at Pasadena City College's Sexson Auditorium, dancers and singers from a variety of backgrounds will perform for 2 1/2 hours in an evening show.
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