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November 17, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hiroyuki Sato, a computer systems engineer from Beppu, Japan, decided to honeymoon in Australia because he likes animals and wanted to see kangaroos and koalas. He also thought the country was safe and its food and water sanitary--and he had heard that Australians welcome foreign visitors. Indeed they do--and among them, Japanese rate among the most favored. Last year, as 2.25 million foreigners visited the country, tourist revenue reached $5.2 billion, to become Australia's No.
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NEWS
April 11, 1995
From the appearance of its people, Australia may once have seemed a huge chunk of Europe that had somehow made its way to the South Pacific. No longer. The island continent is becoming in its populace what it has always been in location--a part of Asia. Sections of the largest city, Sydney, are blossoming with immigrant communities from the Asian mainland.
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NEWS
April 11, 1995
From the appearance of its people, Australia may once have seemed a huge chunk of Europe that had somehow made its way to the South Pacific. No longer. The island continent is becoming in its populace what it has always been in location--a part of Asia. Sections of the largest city, Sydney, are blossoming with immigrant communities from the Asian mainland.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hiroyuki Sato, a computer systems engineer from Beppu, Japan, decided to honeymoon in Australia because he likes animals and wanted to see kangaroos and koalas. He also thought the country was safe and its food and water sanitary--and he had heard that Australians welcome foreign visitors. Indeed they do--and among them, Japanese rate among the most favored. Last year, as 2.25 million foreigners visited the country, tourist revenue reached $5.2 billion, to become Australia's No.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | FRANCIS DANIEL, REUTERS
Thousands of people sneak into Australia every year, lured by its image as the "lucky country" where space and wealth are easy to find. Illegal immigrants, given scant attention in the past when they were relatively few in number, are receiving increasing scrutiny as a result of an emotional public debate over the influx of Asians into Australia's predominantly white society.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1996 | Ross Terrill, Ross Terrill is the author of "The Australians," as well as "China in our Time," "Madame Mao" and "Mao." He recently lectured at the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Once again, Australians worry about Asia's opinion of them. It is an old theme but as an expatriate back in the country, I am struck by its bizarre resurgence. Hasn't Australia resolved this issue? Decades ago, it deracialized immigration policy--most immigrants to Australia are Asians--and shifted its international economic involvement from Europe to Asia. Canberra plays an important role in regional diplomacy and trade consultation--being the prime originator of the Asia Pacific Economic Community, whose leaders will meet Nov. 25 in the Philippines.
NEWS
September 22, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In leading a peacekeeping force to rescue East Timor from the ravages of anarchy, Australia is repaying a 57-year-old debt to a people who provided this nation with heroic support during World War II--and then were largely abandoned. The ties date back to 1942, when Australia covertly inserted a guerrilla force into East Timor to harass Japanese bombers that struck Darwin 64 times during the war, killing 264 people and forcing the evacuation of the city's civilian population.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | KEITH B. RICHBURG, The Washington Post
Only two decades after the Canberra government officially abandoned the longstanding "white Australia" policy by opening the doors to an influx of nonwhite, non-European immigrants, the demographic face of Australia is changing dramatically. Twenty percent of Australia's 16 million people were born in another country, and Asia now leads Europe, Africa, North America and the Middle East as the largest source of new arrivals.
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