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Asians United States

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1988 | MARK ARAX, Times Staff Writer
Tom Chi's first job in America was busing tables at a fancy restaurant. A few months later, at the age of 37, he was promoted to waiter. Chi, a Chinese immigrant, considered hard work and thriftiness second nature, but all the scrimping and saving and 15-hour shifts got him no closer to the dream of opening his own business.
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NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A last-ditch attempt by Orange County Rep. Dana Rohrabacher to head off growing opposition to his plan to promote "merit-only" college admissions policies collapsed last week when a key California congressman rejected the second of two proposed compromises. The opposition of Asian-Americans to his proposals has surprised Rohrabacher, who says his intention is to correct an injustice suffered by that ethnic group.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The government Thursday released the first official census 2000 figures, showing a rapid growth of Latino and Asian populations--even in areas of the Deep South and Midwest. The Latino population in Wisconsin, for example, grew by 107% during the 1990s, to 192,921. In Mississippi, the Asian population grew by at least 50% and as much as 84%--a range that takes into account a new option that allowed people to check off more than one racial category for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Years ago in Vietnam, the census meant the government wanted to keep a close eye on you--to make sure you carried the proper identification, lived where you were supposed to and could be easily found for the military draft. It's a cultural carry-over that still evokes fear among some Vietnamese in this country when they are asked to fill out census forms. Mindful of these fears, the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sprint, the nation's third-largest long-distance company, is teaming up with a government agency and one of the industry's leading critics to develop a program that would teach new Asian and Latino residents how to use the telephone. Sprint will finance the effort, which includes a $35,000 contribution for San Francisco-based Consumer Action to develop and distribute fact sheets on such topics as using 911 and how to protect yourself against telephone fraud.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
While undocumented aliens from Mexico and Central America have been jamming into government centers by the thousands to apply for legalization under the immigration amnesty program, Asians have largely been staying away, according to federal officials. Before the start of the program on May 2, immigration lawyers and community organizations had unofficially estimated that 20,000 to 30,000 of the 200,000 Chinese immigrants residing in Los Angeles County might qualify for amnesty.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | IRENE CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials have agreed to create a separate category for Asians should a controversial statistical method be employed to readjust results of the 1990 Census. Peter Bounpane, assistant Census Bureau director, said Friday that the bureau will modify its so-called post-enumeration survey, which previously grouped Asians with Anglos for the purpose of correcting undercounts of minorities and the poor in the 1990 Census.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The government Thursday released the first official census 2000 figures, showing a rapid growth of Latino and Asian populations--even in areas of the Deep South and Midwest. The Latino population in Wisconsin, for example, grew by 107% during the 1990s, to 192,921. In Mississippi, the Asian population grew by at least 50% and as much as 84%--a range that takes into account a new option that allowed people to check off more than one racial category for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Years ago in Vietnam, the census meant the government wanted to keep a close eye on you--to make sure you carried the proper identification, lived where you were supposed to and could be easily found for the military draft. It's a cultural carry-over that still evokes fear among some Vietnamese in this country when they are asked to fill out census forms. Mindful of these fears, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Vietnam years ago, the census meant the government wanted to keep a close eye on you--to make sure you carried the proper identification, lived where you were supposed to live and could be found easily for the military draft. It's a cultural carry-over that still evokes fear among some Vietnamese in this country when they are asked to fill out census forms. Mindful of these fears, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999
After five generations in the United States, Japanese Americans are no longer the country's largest Asian group, having dropped to third, behind Chinese and Filipinos, in the 1990 census. Still, among people of Asian ancestry, Japanese Americans enjoy the highest representation in politics, government and the upper echelons of academia and the corporate world.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The sound of crashing markets in Asia is being heard on American college campuses, as international students receive word from their fretful parents: cut back on expenses or come home. USC junior Elizabeth Choo is packing to return to South Korea. She got an urgent phone call from her mother, explaining that the collapse of South Korea's currency in effect had doubled the cost of her $30,000 in tuition, expenses, room and board.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The sound of crashing markets in Asia is being heard on American college campuses, as international students receive word from their fretful parents: cut back on expenses or come home. USC junior Elizabeth Choo is packing to return to South Korea. She got an urgent phone call from her mother, explaining that the collapse of South Korea's currency in effect had doubled the cost of her $30,000 in tuition, expenses, room and board.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | JOYCE M. ROSENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Susan Yee is at home in a store. She's spent her whole career in retailing, and she loves to just be a consumer. But Yee also finds that shopping as an Asian woman can be frustrating, especially at cosmetics counters. Even with the wide palette of foundations and eye shadows offered by the big manufacturers, she can't find the shades that would highlight the yellow undertones of her complexion. Her five sisters and their friends have the same problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999
After five generations in the United States, Japanese Americans are no longer the country's largest Asian group, having dropped to third, behind Chinese and Filipinos, in the 1990 census. Still, among people of Asian ancestry, Japanese Americans enjoy the highest representation in politics, government and the upper echelons of academia and the corporate world.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Groups representing Latinos and Asians told a National League of Cities conference in Washington that 10% or more of the people within their communities, facing language barriers or fearing deportation if they cooperate with the government, may be overlooked in the U.S. census. The Census Bureau acknowledged that it has not been able to survey minority areas as effectively as white, English-speaking communities. However, it pointed to several new initiatives to reach out to recent immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Buddhism is ever to gain a national voice on social and ethical issues, it will have to look to U.S.-born converts and a younger generation of Asian immigrants, say leaders of a movement for an American version of the 2,500-year-old religion. "There is a generation gap," said the Venerable Havanpola Ratanasara of Los Angeles, who was reelected executive president of the American Buddhist Congress at the group's recent national convention in Koreatown.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Census Bureau figures show that the foreign-born population of the United States rose dramatically in the 1980s to about 7.9% of all residents, and most of these immigrants are centered in urban areas, where they pose potentially grave problems for educators. The figures show that Orange County, once a suburban white enclave, now has about three times more foreign-born residents than the nation as a whole. People born in countries other than the United States comprise 23.
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