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BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
In a dramatic about-face, Ask.com is abandoning its effort to outshine Internet search leader Google Inc. and will instead focus on a narrower market -- married women looking for help managing their lives. As part of the new direction outlined Tuesday, the company, founded in 1996 as AskJeeves.com, will lay off about 40 employees, or 8% of its workforce. With the shift, the Oakland company will return to its roots by concentrating on finding answers to basic questions about recipes, hobbies and children's homework.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Corporate America may be running away from Paula Deen as fast as it can, but ordinary viewers are sticking with the deposed chef, a new poll says.  Seventy-one percent of respondents said they did not believe that Deen was a racist, according to the online survey from search engine Ask.com. And nearly two-thirds believe that another network will pick up Deen, who was dumped by the Food Network after scandal engulfed her last month. PHOTOS: Paula Deen scandal A court deposition surfaced in which Deen admitted to using the N-word and also planning a wedding party that would attire black wait staff as  slaves.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Microsoft Corp. hired Steve Berkowitz, head of IAC/InterActiveCorp's Ask.com, to lead its MSN unit, which is battling search leader Google Inc. for Web users. Berkowitz will be senior vice president of Microsoft's online business group, responsible for marketing, sales and business development at the MSN unit and Windows Live, Microsoft said. He replaces David Cole. Microsoft is spending hundreds of millions of dollars on its MSN Search to attract users and challenge Google Inc. and Yahoo Inc.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2011 | Meg James, Los Angeles Times
CBS Corp. has acquired Clicker Media Inc. and installed its co-founder, Jim Lanzone, as president of CBS Interactive, putting him in charge of shaping the broadcast giant's strategy in the fast-changing digital world. For more than two years, Lanzone has been building Clicker into what is considered the "TV Guide" of the Internet. The service allows consumers to sort through hundreds of thousands of TV show episodes and movies available online by cataloging them and providing search results and viewing recommendations.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2006 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
Forget the butler. Ask.com is playing concierge. The search engine, previously known as Ask Jeeves, today is launching a service to connect Web surfers with local business listings, movie times, events and digital maps. What separates AskCity from rival local search engines, analysts say, is the depth of information it's able to draw on from its corporate parent, IAC/InterActiveCorp.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Corporate America may be running away from Paula Deen as fast as it can, but ordinary viewers are sticking with the deposed chef, a new poll says.  Seventy-one percent of respondents said they did not believe that Deen was a racist, according to the online survey from search engine Ask.com. And nearly two-thirds believe that another network will pick up Deen, who was dumped by the Food Network after scandal engulfed her last month. PHOTOS: Paula Deen scandal A court deposition surfaced in which Deen admitted to using the N-word and also planning a wedding party that would attire black wait staff as  slaves.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Ask.com became the first major search engine to promise users it won't store data on their queries, giving people concerned about privacy the option of conducting research on the Internet in relative anonymity. The move comes amid increasing concerns about the release of search information through leaks or subpoenas.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
IAC/InterActiveCorp., an Internet and media company run by Barry Diller, added features to the Ask Jeeves search engine and renamed it Ask.com, retiring Jeeves the butler from the website. Ask.com offers shortcuts to more than 20 search tools such as maps and a dictionary, New York-based IAC said. It also has a Web-based desktop-search function that allows users to access files and e-mails on their computers through a browser. A cartoon Jeeves appeared on the home page of the old site.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2007 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Ask.com fields one-tenth of the Web search queries that Google Inc. does. So why bother? It turns out there's a lot of money to be made on winning even 5% of the market for search, a $7-billion business that's growing more than 30% a year, according to research firm EMarketer Inc. To keep its 30 million U.S.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc.'s search results page, one of the most sought-after addresses on the Web, is getting a major makeover. The Mountain View, Calif., giant said Wednesday that the page, where the results of an Internet search are listed, will have a new column on the left containing navigation tools to help users dig deeper for information. It would help sort results by content type and date, and even suggest other links or ways to refine the search. Google, which runs the world's most popular search engine, says it wants its millions of users to more quickly and easily find what they are looking for on the Internet.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2010 | Bloomberg News
Ask.com, the Internet search engine that media mogul Barry Diller acquired for $1.85 billion to compete with Google Inc., is cutting 130 engineering jobs and conceding much of its search business to competitors. Ask.com, a unit of Diller's IAC/InterActiveCorp., is dismissing engineers based in Edison, N.J., and in Hangzhou, China, and ceasing work on its algorithmic search technology, Ask.com President Doug Leeds said. The search unit will consolidate its engineering operations at its headquarters in Oakland and focus its resources on developing its online question-and-answer service.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc.'s search results page, one of the most sought-after addresses on the Web, is getting a major makeover. The Mountain View, Calif., giant said Wednesday that the page, where the results of an Internet search are listed, will have a new column on the left containing navigation tools to help users dig deeper for information. It would help sort results by content type and date, and even suggest other links or ways to refine the search. Google, which runs the world's most popular search engine, says it wants its millions of users to more quickly and easily find what they are looking for on the Internet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2009 | Duke Helfand and Joanna Lin
Have you ever tried to define God? Or wondered whether it is ethical to eat meat? Or debated if pornography is a sin? For a decade, AskMoses.com has been answering questions like these to a growing worldwide audience. Rabbinic scholars from the Orthodox Jewish Chabad movement dispense the free advice online 24 hours a day, six days a week (they don't work on the Sabbath).
BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
In a dramatic about-face, Ask.com is abandoning its effort to outshine Internet search leader Google Inc. and will instead focus on a narrower market -- married women looking for help managing their lives. As part of the new direction outlined Tuesday, the company, founded in 1996 as AskJeeves.com, will lay off about 40 employees, or 8% of its workforce. With the shift, the Oakland company will return to its roots by concentrating on finding answers to basic questions about recipes, hobbies and children's homework.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2007 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Ask.com on Monday became the first major search engine to let users decide whether it can keep records of their queries in a move hailed by privacy watchdogs. The new Ask.com function could protect people as technology that tracks digital footprints becomes increasingly sophisticated, allowing marketers to mine a wealth of information to tailor advertising and promotions with ever-greater precision, privacy advocates said. They said they hoped the effort by Ask.com -- the fifth-largest U.S.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Ask.com became the first major search engine to promise users it won't store data on their queries, giving people concerned about privacy the option of conducting research on the Internet in relative anonymity. The move comes amid increasing concerns about the release of search information through leaks or subpoenas.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2011 | Meg James, Los Angeles Times
CBS Corp. has acquired Clicker Media Inc. and installed its co-founder, Jim Lanzone, as president of CBS Interactive, putting him in charge of shaping the broadcast giant's strategy in the fast-changing digital world. For more than two years, Lanzone has been building Clicker into what is considered the "TV Guide" of the Internet. The service allows consumers to sort through hundreds of thousands of TV show episodes and movies available online by cataloging them and providing search results and viewing recommendations.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2010 | Bloomberg News
Ask.com, the Internet search engine that media mogul Barry Diller acquired for $1.85 billion to compete with Google Inc., is cutting 130 engineering jobs and conceding much of its search business to competitors. Ask.com, a unit of Diller's IAC/InterActiveCorp., is dismissing engineers based in Edison, N.J., and in Hangzhou, China, and ceasing work on its algorithmic search technology, Ask.com President Doug Leeds said. The search unit will consolidate its engineering operations at its headquarters in Oakland and focus its resources on developing its online question-and-answer service.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2007 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Ask.com fields one-tenth of the Web search queries that Google Inc. does. So why bother? It turns out there's a lot of money to be made on winning even 5% of the market for search, a $7-billion business that's growing more than 30% a year, according to research firm EMarketer Inc. To keep its 30 million U.S.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2006 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
Forget the butler. Ask.com is playing concierge. The search engine, previously known as Ask Jeeves, today is launching a service to connect Web surfers with local business listings, movie times, events and digital maps. What separates AskCity from rival local search engines, analysts say, is the depth of information it's able to draw on from its corporate parent, IAC/InterActiveCorp.
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