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Asperger Syndrome

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OPINION
December 3, 1995
I write to correct one serious error in the article about my wife, Mary, and myself, "Against the Odds: a Love Story" (Oct. 23). I was described as having grown up as an "outcast." That is simply not true. My parents provided for me the same societal and academic inclusion that my two older brothers enjoyed. In the opinion of most people, and even my own, I was eccentrically normal. My parents are gone, but those who remember their dedication must be reassured that I appreciate their efforts to help me grow up with a unique combination of talents and social liabilities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Susan Boyle has been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, the Scottish singer said in an interview with the U.K. newspaper The Observer . A developmental disorder on the milder end of the autism spectrum, Asperger's syndrome affects social interaction and communication skills.  As a child, Boyle, now 52, suffered from learning disabilities she was told resulted from oxygen deprivation at birth. A year ago, she sought the advice of a specialist who determined she had an above average IQ. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times "I was told I had brain damage.
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NEWS
March 12, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a Sherman Oaks schoolroom, 17-year-old Tom Iland is sitting through one of his toughest classes. It's not science: Tom is good at science. Not math: When he was in ninth grade, he tested as equivalent to a college senior in math. The class is "social skills," and Tom is poring over the importance of smiling and frowning at the proper time and place. "When you use appropriate facial expressions," he reads, "you may avoid getting into trouble. You may make a good impression.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Mothers who took folic acid supplements around the time they became pregnant were less likely to have children with an autism spectrum disorder, a new study has found. Researchers in Norway examined health records of more than 85,000 children born there between 1999 and 2009 to see whether they had some kind of autism diagnosis. They also looked at questionnaires completed by their mothers to see how much folic acid they were consuming in the month before they became pregnant and during the first eight weeks of pregnancy, a critical period of embryonic brain development.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is director of the 21st Century Project at the University of Texas at Austin
To the surprise of many people, and the dismay of some computer professionals, the formerly derogatory labels "geek" and "nerd" are now being used with pride--or at least resignation--by a growing number of young computer experts. What makes a computer geek? There is some fascinating speculation going on these days that the well-known stereotype of the computer geek or nerd may actually be a description of mild autism, especially a form of autism known as Asperger's syndrome.
OPINION
May 5, 2003
There is a little something to provoke everyone in a new theory by Simon Baron-Cohen that Albert Einstein and Sir Isaac Newton suffered from Asperger syndrome, a mild form of autism characterized by obsessive interests, difficulty in social relationships and trouble communicating. As director of the Autism Center at Cambridge University, Baron-Cohen has conducted lab studies that support the theory put forward by Viennese pediatrician Hans Asperger in 1944.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Mothers who took folic acid supplements around the time they became pregnant were less likely to have children with an autism spectrum disorder, a new study has found. Researchers in Norway examined health records of more than 85,000 children born there between 1999 and 2009 to see whether they had some kind of autism diagnosis. They also looked at questionnaires completed by their mothers to see how much folic acid they were consuming in the month before they became pregnant and during the first eight weeks of pregnancy, a critical period of embryonic brain development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
When a 19-year-old Orange County youth donned a costume on Halloween weekend and went on a shooting rampage, killing two Aliso Viejo neighbors and then himself, sheriff's deputies were puzzled as to why. Then news reports revealed that William Freund had visited an Internet message board for people with Asperger's syndrome. There, he left a trail of messages contemplating suicide and foreshadowing the violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2005 | Kimi Yoshino, Mai Tran and Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writers
In the weeks before 19-year-old William Freund donned a cape and mask and went on a shooting rampage in his Aliso Viejo neighborhood, he reached out for help on the Internet. He wrote more than two dozen online messages in October, asking for a "real life" friend and saying he was contemplating suicide. He also threatened to start "a Terror Campaign to hurt those that have hurt me."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Susan Boyle has been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, the Scottish singer said in an interview with the U.K. newspaper The Observer . A developmental disorder on the milder end of the autism spectrum, Asperger's syndrome affects social interaction and communication skills.  As a child, Boyle, now 52, suffered from learning disabilities she was told resulted from oxygen deprivation at birth. A year ago, she sought the advice of a specialist who determined she had an above average IQ. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times "I was told I had brain damage.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The Uninvited A Novel Liz Jensen Bloomsbury: 325 pp., $25 The psychologically flawed detective is everywhere, from television's "Monk" (with OCD) to Jonathan Lethem's award-winning novel "Motherless Brooklyn" (with Tourette's). In "The Uninvited," British writer Liz Jensen brings us Hesketh Lock, an elite, handsome corporate investigator with Asperger's syndrome who must confront a world sliding into chaos. Lock is good at reading patterns in part because he looks past human emotions.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Autism rates may be far higher than previously estimated, researchers reported Monday. But the new study, which found a rate of autism spectrum disorder of one in 38 children in South Korea, included highly functioning children who appear to have a milder disorder usually called Asperger's syndrome. Whether Asperger's syndrome is a distinct disorder or a variation of autism is a question under debate by psychiatrists. The current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual -- the text book of mental disorders -- lists Asperger's syndrome as distinct from autism.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
More than two decades ago, Dustin Hoffman won an Oscar for his portrayal of an autistic adult in the 1988 film "Rain Man. " This year, Claire Danes snagged an Emmy for her role in "Temple Grandin," an HBO movie that chronicled the remarkable life of an autistic woman who graduated from college and became an expert in the humane handling of livestock. Movies and TV shows can be a powerful force in shaping attitudes about mental health disorders, but do Hollywood-crafted tales tell the whole story?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle
Is there anyone among us who does not know, or know of, a child with an autism spectrum disorder? Whether diagnostic criteria are allowing us to identify more individuals, or something in the environment is causing more autism, or our social habits and educational guidelines no longer encourage families to isolate kids with developmental differences, there are more children with autism and Asperger's Syndrome in our classrooms, on our sports teams and...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2010 | By Julia Keller
She takes none of it for granted. Not the sales figures, the fame, the fortune, the fact that her name pops up on bestseller lists with the frequency of freakishly popular scribes such as Stephen King and Mary Higgins Clark. If you're inclined to trust what Jodi Picoult says -- and if you're not, then you're the kind of cynic who probably isn't interested in her or her books, anyway -- she is still, after 17 novels and 18 years on the job, just as humble, wide-eyed and hardworking as she was at the beginning of her career.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Karan Johar's "My Name Is Khan" is a sweeping epic in the melodramatic Bollywood manner yet emerges as a potent, engaging and timely entertainment. Shahrukh Khan stars as Rizwan Khan, whose Asperger's syndrome goes undiagnosed until the death of his loving mother sends him off to San Francisco to live with his younger brother, whose psychologist wife makes the diagnosis. Having been raised with affection and sensitivity, Khan, who is well-educated and exceptionally intelligent, is already high-functioning.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Autism rates may be far higher than previously estimated, researchers reported Monday. But the new study, which found a rate of autism spectrum disorder of one in 38 children in South Korea, included highly functioning children who appear to have a milder disorder usually called Asperger's syndrome. Whether Asperger's syndrome is a distinct disorder or a variation of autism is a question under debate by psychiatrists. The current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual -- the text book of mental disorders -- lists Asperger's syndrome as distinct from autism.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
More than two decades ago, Dustin Hoffman won an Oscar for his portrayal of an autistic adult in the 1988 film "Rain Man. " This year, Claire Danes snagged an Emmy for her role in "Temple Grandin," an HBO movie that chronicled the remarkable life of an autistic woman who graduated from college and became an expert in the humane handling of livestock. Movies and TV shows can be a powerful force in shaping attitudes about mental health disorders, but do Hollywood-crafted tales tell the whole story?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
A Caltech graduate student convicted five years ago of conspiracy and arson for vandalizing 125 SUVs has had his arson convictions overturned and his sentence vacated by a federal appeals court. William Cottrell, 29, should have been allowed to present evidence during his 2004 trial that his suffering from Asperger's syndrome prevented him from forming the specific intent to commit the arson attacks, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in an amended opinion this week. Cottrell's conspiracy conviction was upheld, but the 100-month prison sentence imposed on him for all of the offenses was vacated.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2009 | Samantha Dunn
Parallel Play Growing Up With Undiagnosed Asperger's Tim Page Doubleday: 198 pp., $26 Are we who we are in spite of our afflictions, or because of them? This question beats at the heart of Tim Page's brief, unadorned memoir, "Parallel Play: Growing Up With Undiagnosed Asperger's." An odd, obsessive yet intellectually gifted man, Page was diagnosed in his 40s with Asperger's syndrome, part of a cluster of disorders that includes autism. Asperger's is often characterized by extreme awkwardness in social interactions, clumsy motor skills and a compulsive desire to collect encyclopedic details about random subjects.
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