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Aspirin

HEALTH
November 26, 2007 | John Dreyer, Special to The Times
My pill case was raided twice, on two separate trips across the country -- once by my mother-in-law and once by my wife. Each time, the culprit paid a price but lived to tell about it. They were fortunate. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices warns against taking someone else's medication, saying it could interact with your own medication or cause an allergic reaction.
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HEALTH
November 26, 2007 | By John Dreyer, Special to The Times
My pill case was raided twice, on two separate trips across the country -- once by my mother-in-law and once by my wife. Each time, the culprit paid a price but lived to tell about it. They were fortunate. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices warns against taking someone else's medication, saying it could interact with your own medication or cause an allergic reaction. The first pill-snatching incident occurred while my wife and I were in New York, where our mutual boss was accepting a prestigious award and giving a speech.
HEALTH
May 14, 2007 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
ASPIRIN, a miracle drug packed into a tiny white pill, has had its dosage dictated by a century-old manufacturing process. Now researchers have studied the standard doses that 50 million American adults take daily to prevent cardiovascular disease. And they've found that less is better. Most people who take daily aspirin to prevent heart disease take either 81 milligrams, a standard baby aspirin, or 325 milligrams, a standard adult pill.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Aspirin in low to moderate doses may lower health risks in women, particularly those who are older and prone to heart disease, a 24-year study of nearly 80,000 women suggests. But experts cautioned that the results were not definitive and that women should not take aspirin as a preventive without talking to their doctor. The results were published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
HEALTH
January 22, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
IT'S been almost two decades since the discovery that aspirin could help prevent heart attacks and strokes when taken regularly. Now a study suggests the analgesic pill may also help prevent the development of asthma in adults. The study, published in the Jan.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2006 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The government Tuesday proposed stronger safety warnings for nonprescription painkillers found in most family medicine cabinets -- as well as many an office drawer and gym bag -- including aspirin, Tylenol, Advil, Motrin and Aleve. The Food and Drug Administration said it was concerned that consumers were poorly informed about serious and potentially fatal complications from misusing the medications, although the risks are well-known to healthcare professionals.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2006 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
This should get your blood flowing. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University have found that chocolate thins blood and protects the heart in the same way aspirin does. The keys are compounds in chocolate called flavonoids, which slow down platelet clumping that can block off blood vessels and lead to a heart attack or stroke.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | Joe Graedon And Teresa Graedon, Special to The Times
I've heard that ibuprofen will negate the positive effects of aspirin if the two are taken together. I read a report that says ibuprofen blocks aspirin's effect for only two hours and that it's safe to take ibuprofen two hours after aspirin to circumvent this effect. Any truth to this? Several years ago, a report in the New England Journal of Medicine (Dec. 20, 2001) suggested that ibuprofen could counteract the anti-clotting benefits of aspirin.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
To the surprise of researchers, a major study has found no benefit -- and perhaps some harm -- from adding the anti-clotting drug Plavix to aspirin in an attempt to prevent heart attacks in people at high risk. Plavix has previously been shown to significantly reduce the risk of heart attacks in people who have already had one, and physicians assumed it would be equally helpful in preventing an initial attack when given with aspirin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2006 | Noel Holston, Special to The Times
In a heavily promoted live episode of "Will & Grace" that NBC recently broadcast, the title characters opened a linen closet in the palatial bathroom belonging to their wealthy friend Karen Walker. Out gushed hundreds and hundreds of pill bottles, a river of amber-colored plastic. The studio audience went wild.
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