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November 21, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Darwin Payne, 76, of Dallas, was among the crowd of reporters dispatched to cover the aftermath of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  Now a professor emeritus of communications at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Payne discussed his memories of that day with the Los Angeles Times. He recounted the tense atmosphere surrounding Kennedy's visit, seeing Lee Harvey Oswald and interviewing Abraham Zapruder, who with his home movie camera captured the fatal shot. What did you think of Kennedy before he came to Dallas?
November 20, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- As a small-town mayor in the drug-trafficking western state of Michoacan, she survived two assassination attempts. One claimed the life of her husband; another three months later left her badly wounded. That was in 2009 and 2010. Her mayoral term ended in 2011. And over the weekend, Maria de los Santos Gorrostieta Salazar was slain, apparently tortured and beaten to death, her body dumped in a ravine. Gorrostieta had been mayor of Tiquicheo, a remote town in the so-called hotlands of Michoacan, farmland firmly under the thumb of drug-trafficking cartels.
October 24, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
As a teenager in the 1970s, I learned about the paranoid style of American politics from the Kennedy assassination. Between seventh grade, when I discovered the Warren Commission report, and my junior year in high school, when I wrote a term paper "proving" that there had been three gunmen in Dealey Plaza, I was a kid obsessed. I read every book about the assassination I could get my hands on; I bought a bootleg Super 8 copy of the Zapruder film from the classifieds in Argosy magazine.
June 25, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
In “The Assassination of Leon Trotsky,” a world premiere at the Odyssey, Peter Lefcourt, a playwright and Emmy-winning television writer-producer, slips his chain. The play has been subtitled “A Comedy,” but it's clear that Lefcourt intends an out-and-out farce. But in farce, catastrophe gallops through a slammed boudoir door or five, catching its characters hilariously unawares. In “Trotsky,” the characters embrace chaos deliberately and without motivation, a soggy approach that considerably dampens the humor.
April 17, 1992
I agree that the classified files on the J.F.K. assassination will probably not contain any blockbuster revelations or a "smoking gun," but it might indirectly answer some questions and pose new ones. To read the Warren Report is to see the heart of the lie, a well-thought-out, well-directed and masterfully choreographed lie. We the people, not just lawyers and politicians, have read the Warren Report and see it for what it truly is--a verbose fabrication and myopic view of what some individuals would have us believe is history.
May 30, 1991
If we were able to bring Rajiv Gandhi back to life, we would do so. So would we, if we could, turn back the clock to before his assassination to prevent it. Since we cannot, we must look beyond this tragedy to what it symbolizes and ask ourselves if such human behavior must continue to be accepted? Is this not the time when we must assume the responsibility to avoid such occurrences in the future? Given all of the diversity in the human realm, including the diversity in perspective and will, we must now focus our attention on means for peaceful reconciliation of the natural differences that exist among us which sometimes lead to destructive human conflict.
October 25, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
On the afternoon of Friday, Nov. 22, 1963, the turgid melodrama of "As the World Turns" was suddenly interrupted by grave news from the real world. In Dallas, three shots had been fired at President John F. Kennedy's motorcade. Fifty-eight minutes later, a visibly moved Walter Cronkite would confirm the unthinkable: The president was dead. For the ensuing three days, Americans gathered around their televisions in a rite of collective mourning as the three broadcast networks abandoned their regularly scheduled programming to provide uninterrupted news coverage.
November 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
For a few years after seeing Oliver Stone's 1991 political thriller "JFK," I was an assassination buff. I bought one of the books on which the film was based: “On the Trail of the Assassins” by Jim Garrison. I reread “Libra,” Don DeLillo's masterful 1988 novel, in which Lee Harvey Oswald, assorted New Orleans spies and underworld figures conspire to kill the president. The assassination is the greatest mystery of our times, and in those books I found clues that left me feeling tantalizingly close to solving it. But 20 years ago I was cured of my conspiracy-theory fever forever.
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