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Assassinations New York City

NEWS
November 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A municipal worker pleaded not guilty to charges he killed Jewish extremist Meir Kahane, while followers of the slain right-wing rabbi called for vengeance. "No justice, no peace" chanted about 40 demonstrators outside the courthouse in New York. Defendant El Sayyid Nosair, 35, a native of Egypt, wore a white skullcap with Arabic script around its perimeter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1990 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after the death of Rabbi Meir Kahane, teary-eyed followers of the one-time Brooklyn sportswriter gathered in anger inside a North Hollywood synagogue Tuesday and vowed to try harder to realize his dream of an Arab-free Israel.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A congressman said that FBI agents had warned him his name was on a list found at the home of the man charged with killing militant Rabbi Meir Kahane. Rep. Gary L. Ackerman (D-N.Y.) said FBI officials also told him it could mean he was a possible target of terrorists. The existence of the list of five New York leaders was reported in New York Newsday. The list also included two federal judges, a former assistant U.S. attorney and a columnist for the weekly Jewish Press.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | From Associated Press
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan says Malcolm X would be "so much more valuable" were he alive today, but admits helping create "the atmosphere" that encouraged assassins to kill the Muslim activist. In an interview that aired Friday night on ABC-TV's "20/20," Farrakhan said he was angry with Malcolm X for splitting with Nation of Islam founder Elijah Muhammad and publicly criticizing him. "I was very angry with Malcolm for what Malcolm had done.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Authorities said Tuesday that the alleged assassin of controversial Jewish activist Rabbi Meir Kahane was an Egyptian-born municipal maintenance worker in New York City's criminal courts building who apparently acted alone. Chief of Detectives Joseph Borrelli said that initial indications were that 34-year-old El-Sayyid A. Nosair, who arrived in the United States from Egypt in 1981 and became a naturalized citizen last year, was not part of any conspiracy with other individuals or groups.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
Malcolm X's widow said in a television interview that she believes Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan was involved in her husband's assassination. Betty Shabazz previously has criticized Farrakhan but never directly accused him of complicity in the 1965 assassination. In a taped interview for broadcast Sunday on WNBC-TV's "News Forum," Shabazz was asked if she believes that Farrakhan "had anything to do with the death of your husband." "Of course, yes," she replied. "Nobody kept it a secret.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury late Saturday found an Egyptian-born Muslim man not guilty of killing Rabbi Meir Kahane, the controversial founder of the militant Jewish Defense League. El Sayyid Nosair, 36, also was acquitted of the attempted murder of a postal police officer. Nosair was convicted of criminal possession of a weapon, assaulting postal policeman Carlos Acosta and another man and coercion for seizing a taxi as he fled the mid-Manhattan hotel where Kahane was slain on Nov. 5, 1990.
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | STEPHEN BRAUN and JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The background of the key informant in an alleged plot by the daughter of Malcolm X to murder Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan became the focus of attention on Friday for critics of the government's case, including representatives of Farrakhan himself. Qubilah Shabazz, 34, faces charges in Minneapolis of hiring a hit man to kill Farrakhan. The man to whom she allegedly made a partial payment will testify at the trial.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The discovery of an alleged plot to stage multiple bombings and assassinations in New York City points to a different kind of terrorist, with new tactics and targets that could present grave new dangers for the United States and the "new world order," U.S. officials and terrorism experts say. In stark contrast to the terrorist stereotype in the 1970s and 1980s, the new threat seems to emanate from unsophisticated but dedicated amateurs using conventional and easily accessible weapons.
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