Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAssembly Health Committee
IN THE NEWS

Assembly Health Committee

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
January 24, 2004
How pathetic that the chairman of the Assembly Health Committee should even have to consider a bill to legalize the import of prescription drugs from Canada (Jan. 21). It seems unconscionable that drug manufacturers, while relying on the United States for protection, comfort and even research dollars, choose to sell their pharmaceuticals at substantially lower prices to other nations. If they can afford to do that, then the doubling and tripling of prices to their fellow countrymen exhibits incredible greed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 24, 2004
How pathetic that the chairman of the Assembly Health Committee should even have to consider a bill to legalize the import of prescription drugs from Canada (Jan. 21). It seems unconscionable that drug manufacturers, while relying on the United States for protection, comfort and even research dollars, choose to sell their pharmaceuticals at substantially lower prices to other nations. If they can afford to do that, then the doubling and tripling of prices to their fellow countrymen exhibits incredible greed.
Advertisement
OPINION
May 16, 2002
Jamie Court virtually accused the Assembly Health Committee of selling out to the insurance industry by refusing to pass a number of legislative proposals mandating new health benefits for health plan enrollees (Commentary, May 8). His accusation is both insulting to committee members and lacking in any understanding of the needs of working families. What the committee recognized is that rising health-care costs are threatening the ability of many employers and individuals to afford insurance, and that the greatest public need right now is not new benefits but the ability to afford the benefits already in place.
OPINION
May 16, 2002
Jamie Court virtually accused the Assembly Health Committee of selling out to the insurance industry by refusing to pass a number of legislative proposals mandating new health benefits for health plan enrollees (Commentary, May 8). His accusation is both insulting to committee members and lacking in any understanding of the needs of working families. What the committee recognized is that rising health-care costs are threatening the ability of many employers and individuals to afford insurance, and that the greatest public need right now is not new benefits but the ability to afford the benefits already in place.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A controversial measure to overturn a court decision that allowed mentally ill patients to refuse anti-psychotic drugs was stalled in the Assembly Health Committee. Lacking the votes to move his bill through committee, Sen. Robert Presley (D-Riverside) asked that action be delayed while he negotiates with the opposition. Last year's court decision requires psychiatrists to obtain the informed consent of even those patients hospitalized against their will before administering medication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1997
As the authors of pending legislation to implement the Kennedy-Kassebaum insurance "portability" law, we take exception to your Oct. 12 article suggesting that Californians will not receive more than the minimum benefits because Democrats are trying to "load up" the issue, in the words of Gov. Pete Wilson's spokesperson. The issue is quite simple--increased availability of health coverage. The new federal law is supposed to make sure that people who lose their jobs can continue their health coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1997
Congratulations on "Needle Programs Are Needed" (editorial, July 8). As a member of the Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Commission of L.A. County I attended a symposium on needle exchange programs six years ago. A statement made by one of the presenters was mind-boggling: "Every time you hand out a needle you may be saving a life." It's true. Each day, babies are born infected with HIV because of contaminated needles. SB 885 will be heard in the Assembly Health Committee on Tuesday. Although Gov. Pete Wilson has vetoed the last three bills, perhaps the new evidence as endorsed by the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Legislative allies of the powerful liquor lobby, in a rarely used procedural move, sidetracked a bill Friday that would require health warning labels on all alcoholic beverage containers. The bill by Assemblyman Lloyd Connelly (D-Sacramento), which narrowly cleared the Assembly Health Committee earlier this week, would warn pregnant women about the dangers of alcohol-related birth defects.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) and Assemblyman Curtis R. Tucker (D-Inglewood) seem to have called a truce in a two-year feud that has several times threatened to block legislation carried by the two Democrats. As the Legislature prepared to adjourn on Sept. 11, Montoya, who was on the Assembly floor shepherding a bill, playfully tugged Tucker's chin and said, "I still love you." "He was making a friendly gesture," Tucker said later. "I don't have a desire to carry on a feud with anyone."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2002 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising medical costs are stymieing California legislators' attempts to require HMO coverage for such benefits as infertility treatments, bone density screenings and hearing aids. Assembly leaders agreed this week to temporarily shelve such proposed mandates on health plans and instead support the creation of a commission to weigh costs and medical benefits of each possible new coverage requirement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1997
As the authors of pending legislation to implement the Kennedy-Kassebaum insurance "portability" law, we take exception to your Oct. 12 article suggesting that Californians will not receive more than the minimum benefits because Democrats are trying to "load up" the issue, in the words of Gov. Pete Wilson's spokesperson. The issue is quite simple--increased availability of health coverage. The new federal law is supposed to make sure that people who lose their jobs can continue their health coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1997
Congratulations on "Needle Programs Are Needed" (editorial, July 8). As a member of the Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Commission of L.A. County I attended a symposium on needle exchange programs six years ago. A statement made by one of the presenters was mind-boggling: "Every time you hand out a needle you may be saving a life." It's true. Each day, babies are born infected with HIV because of contaminated needles. SB 885 will be heard in the Assembly Health Committee on Tuesday. Although Gov. Pete Wilson has vetoed the last three bills, perhaps the new evidence as endorsed by the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A controversial measure to overturn a court decision that allowed mentally ill patients to refuse anti-psychotic drugs was stalled in the Assembly Health Committee. Lacking the votes to move his bill through committee, Sen. Robert Presley (D-Riverside) asked that action be delayed while he negotiates with the opposition. Last year's court decision requires psychiatrists to obtain the informed consent of even those patients hospitalized against their will before administering medication.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Voting along party lines, Assembly Democrats on Tuesday overcame a bloc of Republican opposition and approved legislation that would guarantee health insurance for 5 million Californians who are now without it. The $5-billion plan, deemed a "socialist" scheme by one GOP critic, would be financed by two new taxes on employers and by portions of the state's Medi-Cal funds, tobacco tax revenue, money now spent on health care for the working poor...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2002 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising medical costs are stymieing California legislators' attempts to require HMO coverage for such benefits as infertility treatments, bone density screenings and hearing aids. Assembly leaders agreed this week to temporarily shelve such proposed mandates on health plans and instead support the creation of a commission to weigh costs and medical benefits of each possible new coverage requirement.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Voting along party lines, Assembly Democrats on Tuesday overcame a bloc of Republican opposition and approved legislation that would guarantee health insurance for 5 million Californians who are now without it. The $5-billion plan, deemed a "socialist" scheme by one GOP critic, would be financed by two new taxes on employers and by portions of the state's Medi-Cal funds, tobacco tax revenue, money now spent on health care for the working poor...
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) and Assemblyman Curtis R. Tucker (D-Inglewood) seem to have called a truce in a two-year feud that has several times threatened to block legislation carried by the two Democrats. As the Legislature prepared to adjourn on Sept. 11, Montoya, who was on the Assembly floor shepherding a bill, playfully tugged Tucker's chin and said, "I still love you." "He was making a friendly gesture," Tucker said later. "I don't have a desire to carry on a feud with anyone."
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Legislative allies of the powerful liquor lobby, in a rarely used procedural move, sidetracked a bill Friday that would require health warning labels on all alcoholic beverage containers. The bill by Assemblyman Lloyd Connelly (D-Sacramento), which narrowly cleared the Assembly Health Committee earlier this week, would warn pregnant women about the dangers of alcohol-related birth defects.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|