Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAssembly Republicans
IN THE NEWS

Assembly Republicans

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1991
In a pressure-cooker negotiation designed to erase the $14-billion-plus deficit, the Republican governor and the legislative majority leaders--Democrats all--are trying to agree on a package of new taxes and cuts to give California a new budget. A deal is needed soon. A repeat of last year's debacle is to be avoided at almost all costs.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Assembly Republican leaders, seeking to show what they would do if they ran the Legislature, Tuesday unveiled a legislative program for 1986 that they hope will help win votes for the GOP at the polls. Calling their list of 120 proposals an "Agenda of Opportunity," the Republicans called for such traditional conservative goals as implementation of the death penalty, a freeze on welfare benefits, an income tax rebate (if the state can afford it) and tax credits for farmers and businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994
It's not over till it's over, not in football and not in the California Assembly. Assemblyman Willie Brown is the ultimate counterargument to anyone who thinks politics is dull. Already he's survived far longer than anyone ever thought he would when he won the Assembly Speaker post in 1980. And Monday he got some some surprise help--a surprise to everyone but Brown--when onetime Republican now independent Assemblyman Paul Horcher voted to keep him as Assembly Speaker.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a largely futile 24-hour delay, the state Assembly gave final legislative approval Wednesday evening to the $81.7-billion budget that cuts taxes by $500 million and significantly boosts money for schools and the environment. Assembly Republicans had bottled up the budget Tuesday night and most of Wednesday but finally gave up and voted for it after Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1995 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is editor and publisher of Inside California, a statewide political newsletter, and Dispatches, a national cultural and media watchdog publication.
By agreeing to share power with a Democratic minority, Republicans in the state Assembly are about to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. Imagine what would have happened if, having won control of the House of Representatives after wandering 40 years in the political wilderness, Newt Gingrich was unable to win the speakership. Imagine, just for a moment, that Rep. Richard Gephardt, the leader of the Democratic minority, had persuaded just enough Republicans to vote for him as Speaker.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | CARL INGRAM and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An increasingly impatient Gov. Pete Wilson told Republican and Democratic legislative leaders Wednesday that he wants a showdown vote in the Assembly today on his deadlocked $56.4-billion budget-balancing program, and the lawmakers agreed.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson went to the mountain Friday, not in search of wisdom but to impart some of his own to his fellow Republicans in the state Assembly. Wilson, fresh from proposing $6.7 billion in new taxes as part of his plan to close a $12.6-billion budget gap, visited the GOP lawmakers as they plotted fiscal strategy at a rustic retreat in the Sierra Nevada foothills.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | PAUL JACOBS and MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writers
Assembly Republican Leader Pat Nolan and one of his top lieutenants, Assemblyman Frank Hill, were ensnared by the FBI's Capitol sting operation because of a high-profile, hard-sell approach to fund raising that boasted of their influence with Gov. George Deukmejian, sources have told The Times.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Wisconsin's Republican-controlled Assembly early Friday approved a controversial bill to strip most government workers of their rights to collectively bargain, but the measure remains stalled because Democrats in the state Senate remain out of state to prevent a vote in that chamber. The 51-17 vote came after 60 solid hours of debate; shortly after 1 a.m. Republicans abruptly cut off Democrats and quickly tallied enough votes for the measure to pass, then closed the roll. Twenty-eight Democrats, two Republicans and an independent were not able to cast their vote.
OPINION
February 11, 1996 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior associate at the Center for Politics and Economics at Claremont Graduate School and a political analyst for KCAL-TV
If Hollywood turned the first weeks of real Republican control of the state Assembly into a movie, it might produce a remake of "The Lost Weekend." That, as film critic Pauline Kael described it, was a movie about a "frustrated, dipsomaniacal writer who goes on a five-day binge that lands him in Bellevue." Assembly Republicans, out of power for a quarter century, quickly flexed their new muscle and pumped out a spate of socially divisive bills.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|