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Assessment Fees

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October 10, 1996 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly a year of arm-twisting and wrangling, California's tourism industry has devised a formula to tax itself to fund tourism marketing--the first such travel-related assessment in the nation. Under the plan, which will be made public this week, California businesses that profit from tourism will be asked to approve a levy of 4.5 cents for every $100 of their revenue from tourism, in an effort to raise $7.5 million for tourism promotion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council has approved $4.4 million in assessments for Westwood Village property owners to fund an ambitious street improvement project. The goal is to create an atmosphere that appeals to pedestrians, said Rochelle Ventura, chief field deputy for Councilman Mike Feuer. Broxton Avenue will be widened, and a double row of trees planted, creating a boulevard atmosphere leading to a planned four-level parking structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1996 | MARILYN MARTINEZ
A swath of Hollywood Boulevard, which includes landmarks such as the El Capitan and Mann Chinese theaters and the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, will be revitalized with money generated by a special $600,000 tax district. The Los Angeles City Council approved the assessment Tuesday, empowering an 11-member board to oversee the new Hollywood Entertainment District. The 41 property owners in the zone will pay $1,400 to $57,000 annually based on property size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA
Water taxes for 65,000 residents of Mission Viejo and Rancho Santa Margarita will be reduced this fiscal year through cost-saving measures by the Santa Margarita Water District, officials said this week. Rancho Santa Margarita residents will see the biggest savings, with a reduction of 14 cents for each $100 of the value of their homes. That will be an annual savings of about $280 for a $200,000 residence, said John Schatz, general manager of the water district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
The City Council on Monday approved a development fee that will raise about $245,000 a year for library services, and also voted unanimously to withdraw from a regional police helicopter venture. The library levy, designated specifically for new books, reference materials, electronic data bases, CD-ROMs, periodicals and videocassettes, will be 25 cents a square foot for new residential developments and 3 cents a square foot for new commercial and industrial projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1996 | NICK GREEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the second time in nine months, the city of Port Hueneme may be forced to return hundreds of thousands of tax dollars that courts ruled were collected illegally. Ten days ago, a Superior Court judge ordered the city to repay more than 1,200 oceanfront residents who have been assessed about $600,000 since 1991 to pay for a portion of the city's beach maintenance cost--a so-called "view tax" that attracted national attention when it was levied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council took final action Wednesday to place a citywide assessment for parks improvements on the November ballot. The tax, which would pay to acquire land and make capital improvements at parks throughout the city, requires a simple majority vote and would raise about $200 million a year for two decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1996
A divided Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday urged the board of the Los Angeles Community College District to withdraw its recently approved property assessment or put the matter to voters in November. Several lawmakers asked their colleagues to leave the issue alone, noting the importance of the community college system to California's future as well as voters' perennial distaste for the colleges' bids for funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1996 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a bad allergy, the nasty fight between Ventura Keys homeowners and city officials comes every spring. Each year in June, angry residents demand that the City Council rescind a $2,000 tax levied annually on their property to pay to dredge silt from the waterways behind their luxury homes. They usually lose. But in a surprise move last week, the council waived the assessment for one year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1996 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's anti-tax activists believe they have been handed a new rallying point for their cause: the action by Los Angeles community college trustees last week imposing an assessment on a million county properties without first seeking approval from owners of the properties. The Los Angeles-based Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn.
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