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TRAVEL
September 26, 1999
Regarding "Picking Up the Pieces in Assisi," Sept. 12: We have visited Assisi four different years, always in an RV. On our last trip, we drove down the mountain road from Camping Fontemaggio, parked in the "wrong" parking lot and found a two-story, canopy-covered escalator leading up the hill toward the upper town. At the top of the escalator, we walked higher through the town, then turned and walked down, down and down the hill, snaking through this most unusual city. Fruit and vegetable vendors filled market squares, and pink-stoned houses and stores lined the narrow walkways.
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WORLD
March 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
VATICAN CITY -- He's a charmer. Pope Francis on Saturday went before several thousand journalists, thanked them for their work, told a joke or two and even blessed (or at least patted) someone's guide dog. In a custom that dates at least to John Paul II, one of the pope's first public appearances was a meeting in the modern Paul VI Hall with an estimated 5,000 reporters who are based in Rome or had flown in to cover the week's historic events. Francis sat on the stage in a large but relatively simple chair and read a speech that thanked the press for its work during this “intense period” which had focused the world's eyes on the Roman Catholic Church.
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NEWS
December 12, 1985 | United Press International
A bomb exploded Wednesday in a chapel of a basilica where St. Francis of Assisi died in 1226, damaging frescoes but causing no injuries.
OPINION
March 14, 2013
The election of a new pope is primarily of interest to Roman Catholics, for whom the bishop of Rome is the Vicar of Christ and the keeper of the keys to heaven. But there is a reason, other than a fascination with history and pageantry, that the wider world will watch expectantly as Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, begins his ministry. Although Stalin famously mocked the papacy by asking, "How many divisions does the pope have?," the institution remains hugely influential, with reach well beyond the church.
TRAVEL
June 21, 1998
My husband and I have just returned from a delightful visit to Assisi, Italy. The most unique part of the visit was the lack of crowds. Since the earthquake in September 1997, the tour books and travel editors have said "don't go." What a mistake! The city is lovely and most of it is undamaged. In keeping with the Italian flair for making everything bella, even the scaffolding is beautiful, with sparkling brass hinges. The lower basilica of St. Francis Church is undamaged. The upper basilica was damaged, and the city has put together a wonderful exhibit in a separate building that shows the video of the actual earthquake (in reality, an aftershock)
SPORTS
January 12, 2012 | Eric Sondheimer
Imagine being a Southern California kid growing up near the beach in Orange County and deciding to head to Italy on your 16th birthday to spend nine months at a boarding school, leaving behind your mother, father, younger brother and friends to follow your dream of trying to become a professional soccer player. Kris Picarelli said he was inspired by his cousin, Italian national team goalkeeper Anna Marie Picarelli, so he packed up his suitcase and boarded a plane Sept. 16, 2010, and didn't return for good until June 20, 2011, missing his sophomore year of high school.
WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
What's in a pope's name? By choosing the name Francis, the Argentine Jesuit who will lead the world's 1.2 billion Roman Catholics has signaled a devotion to simple living and social justice, analysts say. No pope has ever chosen to be called Francis before, and it was not among the names favored by oddsmakers betting on which the new pontiff would choose. The name harks back to St. Francis of Assisi, who founded the Franciscan order. PHOTOS: Electing a pope Picking a name is the first decision made by the new pontiff and a closely watched sign of how he will lead the church.
TRAVEL
March 29, 2009
I read Susan Spano's article on Siena with interest ["Tuscany in Repose," March 15], but was disappointed that it did not mention St. Catherine of Siena, whose head and thumb are on display in the Basilica of San Domenico. She is the patroness saint of Italy. Writing about Siena without mentioning St. Catherine is like writing about Assisi without mentioning St. Francis. Dave Johnston Fountain Valley
WORLD
March 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
VATICAN CITY -- He's a charmer. Pope Francis on Saturday went before several thousand journalists, thanked them for their work, told a joke or two and even blessed (or at least patted) someone's guide dog. In a custom that dates at least to John Paul II, one of the pope's first public appearances was a meeting in the modern Paul VI Hall with an estimated 5,000 reporters who are based in Rome or had flown in to cover the week's historic events. Francis sat on the stage in a large but relatively simple chair and read a speech that thanked the press for its work during this “intense period” which had focused the world's eyes on the Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
October 4, 1997 | From Associated Press
Central Italy quivered and shook again on Friday, as earthquakes injured 20 people and inflicted more damage on the Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi and other buildings hit by temblors a week ago. The earthquakes sparked panic in people still alarmed by the earlier shocks. Many residents once again fled homes and offices for the safety of open areas. "What is this mystery of the earth moving? Can't it stay still?" asked the Rev. Pasquale Magro, head of the the basilica's museum.
WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
What's in a pope's name? By choosing the name Francis, the Argentine Jesuit who will lead the world's 1.2 billion Roman Catholics has signaled a devotion to simple living and social justice, analysts say. No pope has ever chosen to be called Francis before, and it was not among the names favored by oddsmakers betting on which the new pontiff would choose. The name harks back to St. Francis of Assisi, who founded the Franciscan order. PHOTOS: Electing a pope Picking a name is the first decision made by the new pontiff and a closely watched sign of how he will lead the church.
SPORTS
January 12, 2012 | Eric Sondheimer
Imagine being a Southern California kid growing up near the beach in Orange County and deciding to head to Italy on your 16th birthday to spend nine months at a boarding school, leaving behind your mother, father, younger brother and friends to follow your dream of trying to become a professional soccer player. Kris Picarelli said he was inspired by his cousin, Italian national team goalkeeper Anna Marie Picarelli, so he packed up his suitcase and boarded a plane Sept. 16, 2010, and didn't return for good until June 20, 2011, missing his sophomore year of high school.
TRAVEL
March 29, 2009
I read Susan Spano's article on Siena with interest ["Tuscany in Repose," March 15], but was disappointed that it did not mention St. Catherine of Siena, whose head and thumb are on display in the Basilica of San Domenico. She is the patroness saint of Italy. Writing about Siena without mentioning St. Catherine is like writing about Assisi without mentioning St. Francis. Dave Johnston Fountain Valley
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2003 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
Eight centuries after his death, Francis of Assisi remains one of Christianity's most popular saints. Antiwar protesters hold up St. Francis as an example for peacemakers. During the Crusades, he traveled behind enemy lines, where he made friends with Muslim leaders. Spiritually inclined environmentalists say prayers to Francis, patron saint of ecology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2002 | From Associated Press
St. Jerome's white beard is largely gone, his rich cloak looks like it was devoured by moths, and the roll of writing paper on his desk has disappeared. But in a kind of restoration miracle, much of the rest of a renowned Giotto fresco is back on the soaring ceiling of St. Francis Basilica, five years after an earthquake sent the masterpiece crashing to the floor in tens of thousands of fragments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2002 | PEGGY POLK, RELIGION NEWS SERVICE
In a response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Pope John Paul II will lead representatives of Islam and many other religions on a peace pilgrimage to the medieval town of Assisi next week. Two months ago, the Roman Catholic pontiff invited the religious leaders to travel with him to the birthplace of St. Francis on Jan. 24 to "proclaim before the world that religion must never become the motive of conflict, hate and violence."
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | FRANCES D'EMILIO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Francis, you see my house is falling apart, so why don't you restore it?" Jesus chided, and the rich man's son forsook his wealth for a life of service and gentle communion with nature. Eight centuries after Francis of Assisi received the message from a crucifix in a tiny chapel, his birthplace is hearing another appeal for restoration. This one involves paint, plaster and a possible cost of $270 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most striking aspect of their proposed 1,200-seat church, Our Lady Queen of Angels officials plan to build a replica of the Portiuncula Chapel in central Italy, the favorite church of St. Francis of Assisi. A photographer will spend three days this month at Portiuncula to capture the stone chapel on digital film, which will be used to produce architectural plans. "We'll get every little nook and cranny," Father Vincent Gilmore said. "This will be museum quality.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
More than two years and $37 million after an earthquake sent the magnificently frescoed ceiling in this hillside town's basilica crashing down, the church dedicated to St. Francis, the champion of the poor, was formally reopened Sunday. But joy was tempered by concern for the thousands of homeless spending their third winter in trailer camps along the frigid backbone of the Apennine mountain range in central Italy.
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