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NEWS
August 20, 1989
Linda Roach Monroe's article "Kids and Asthma" (Aug. 8) should be extended to physicians across the country. I am extremely disappointed and concerned that there is so little research being done on asthma. There is so much controversy and disagreement on its treatment, yet we are not compelled to find an answer. There are many precautions and preventions of attacks that physicians are not communicating to their patients. It's about time someone has attempted to distribute this information to all doctors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
September 14, 2013 | Emily Dwass
Is what we eat eating away at us? Millions of Americans have reflux disease, with symptoms ranging from annoying to dangerous, and experts believe our diet is a major factor. Reflux is partly a matter of stomach acid moving upward to where it doesn't belong. But a leading researcher, Dr. Jamie Koufman, says an even bigger threat is the digestive enzyme pepsin, which lingers in the esophagus and throat where it is activated by acidic foods and beverages. She preaches that we need to change what, how and when we eat. Koufman, the director of the Voice Institute of New York, says many people have no idea that reflux is behind their health problems.
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NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Famously overweight New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was hospitalized Thursday morning after having trouble breathing.  When his EKG, blood work and chest X-ray came back normal, doctors at the Somerset Medical Center in Somerville, N.J., diagnosed an asthma attack. The rising Republican star has spoken often about his struggles with his weight, even telling CNN talk show host Piers Morgan that he felt "guilty" about it, the Los Angeles Times reported.  He has also talked publicly about living with asthma.  The subject comes up often when he's stumping about healthcare.  According to the Wall Street Journal, the fiscal conservative cites the cost of his asthma medication when expounding on the "generosity of the state health care plan.
SCIENCE
July 2, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
[This post has been corrected. See note at bottom.] A federally approved drug already being inhaled by asthma patients may make mice with Down syndrome smarter, according to a new study. Researchers chose to test the widely manufactured bronchodilator, Formoterol, because it also acts on a brain chemical crucial to memory-based learning. Earlier research had shown a similar compound successfully stimulated production of that brain chemical, called a neurotransmitter, which then improved neuron formation and cognition in mice that had been genetically altered to show symptoms of Down syndrome, according to Dr. Ahmad Salehi, a Stanford University neurobiologist who led the study, published Tuesday in the journal Biological Psychiatry.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Researchers in Europe have confirmed scientifically what parents in traffic-congested Southern California have known anecdotally for years: Poor air quality associated with busy roads can cause asthma in children. The study, which examined children's health in 10 cities, concluded that 14% of chronic childhood asthma cases could be attributed to near-road traffic pollution. It is the first time that medical researchers have made such a direct link - previous studies stopped at saying that traffic pollution is known to trigger asthma, not cause it. The findings are published online in the European Respiratory Journal.
SCIENCE
February 2, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
An infection of the uterine cavity during pregnancy combined with premature birth doubles the risk that an African American child will develop asthma, researchers have found. The combination also increases risk for some other ethnicities, though less severely. About 8% of pregnancies are marked by such bacterial infections, called chorioamnionitis, but it is not yet clear what proportion of asthma is induced by them, said the lead author, Dr. Darios Getahun of Kaiser Permanente's Department of Research and Evaluation in Pasadena.
HEALTH
June 14, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I have used Pycnogenol for almost two years for horrible hot flashes and night sweats. I started with 200 milligrams. It did stop the symptoms, but it felt like I was trying to restart an old engine. I dropped the dose to 150 mg and found that is a good dose for me. The flashes and sweats are minimal and tolerable. An unexpected and welcome side effect is that my asthma is so much better. I was on Symbicort, maximum dosage, and could not wean myself off. I realized my asthma was better after using the Pycnogenol for a short while, and I tried to taper down again.
HEALTH
September 5, 2005 | From Times wire reports
Simply mentioning words such as "wheeze" can activate the brains of asthma patients, researchers have discovered, shedding light on the emotional underpinnings of the disease. The study of six patients found that asthma patients have extra brain activity in an area called the anterior cingulate cortex, which is associated with emotional responses.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Schering-Plough Corp., based in Madison, N.J., said it is recalling some of its prescription asthma inhalers because they may not contain active drugs. The recall includes the Proventil and Warrick brands of inhalation aerosols, generic albuterol inhalers, and various doses of Vanceril inhalers made from Sept. 30, 1997 to Sept. 30, 1999.
HEALTH
August 23, 2004 | Daffodil J. Altan, Times Staff Writer
Parents who decide to rip out the carpeting or buy a humidifier to relieve their child's asthmatic symptoms may be doing the wrong thing. Many of the changes parents make at home for their asthmatic kids are ineffective and may even be detrimental to their kids' health, a new survey found. The University of Michigan study, published in the August issue of the Journal of Allergy and Immunology, found that only half of the 1,788 asthma-proofing steps taken by parents were likely to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Black and Latino infants exposed to air pollution are at heightened risk for developing asthma, according to a study led by researchers from UC San Francisco. The study is the largest of its kind looking at the connections between asthma and air pollution exposure in minority children, researchers said. The study included about 4,300 black and Latino children from Chicago, New York City, Houston, the San Francisco Bay Area and Puerto Rico. The authors said that they hoped the study would lead to stricter standards on air pollutants, including nitrogen dioxide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
A local congressman on Thursday called on Metrolink to assess the health risks of air pollution on neighborhoods surrounding the commuter railroad's central maintenance yard north of downtown Los Angeles. At a press conference, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) made the request on behalf of residents and community groups that have long been concerned about diesel exhaust coming from the commuter system's locomotives when they are serviced. Diesel emissions have been linked to cancer, asthma and other respiratory illnesses, especially in neighborhoods near major transportation corridors that are heavily traveled by trains and trucks.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Researchers in Europe have confirmed scientifically what parents in traffic-congested Southern California have known anecdotally for years: Poor air quality associated with busy roads can cause asthma in children. The study, which examined children's health in 10 cities, concluded that 14% of chronic childhood asthma cases could be attributed to near-road traffic pollution. It is the first time that medical researchers have made such a direct link - previous studies stopped at saying that traffic pollution is known to trigger asthma, not cause it. The findings are published online in the European Respiratory Journal.
HEALTH
February 9, 2013
Apolo Anton Ohno, the most decorated U.S. Winter Olympian of all time, was practicing for the 2002 Games when he learned he had exercise-induced asthma. It obviously didn't destroy the sporting career of the eight-time medalist. And now he is the public face of a program to raise awareness about the condition, which affects more than 30 million Americans. Short-track speed skating doesn't seem like the most popular choice of sports for kids. How did you get into it? I was always active as a child.
OPINION
August 14, 2012 | Antonia Juhasz, Antonia Juhasz is the author of several books on the oil industry, including "The Tyranny of Oil." She is also the editor and lead author of three Alternative Annual Reports on Chevron and the former director of the Chevron Program at San Francisco-based Global Exchange
Stay inside, close your windows and doors, and turn off air conditioning and heating units. Pets and all children in sporting activities should be brought inside, and have duct tape ready should you need to further seal windows and doors. These are among the "shelter in place" warnings made to Bay Area residents last week in response to a massive fire at the Chevron Corp. refinery in Richmond. The fire burned out of control for more than five hours, sending a giant black cloud of toxic chemicals, including sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, thousands of feet into the air and out across the bay. While automated calls went to more than 18,000 people, some 160,000 residents live in the areas directly affected by the warning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
CALEXICO, CALIF. - As the relentless wind stirs up piles of dust and dirt and creates a gigantic funnel of haze in the vast, sweltering Imperial Valley, children like Marco Cisneros battle to breathe. Marco wheezes and coughs and reaches desperately for his inhaler, but the medication doesn't always give him the relief he needs. Often, his mother has to call 911. Since being diagnosed with severe asthma six years ago, Marco, who lives in this border town east of San Diego, has visited the hospital nearly 50 times.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1998 | Dow Jones
Medical Science Systems Inc. said it has formed a joint research and development program for asthma with the University of Sheffield's division of molecular and genetic medicine. Medical Science Systems said it was granted the worldwide license to develop and sell all genetic susceptibility, diagnostic and therapeutic applications resulting from the program with the British university. Both parties have completed three clinical trials and will move some discoveries into the development phase.
HEALTH
April 17, 2006 | From Times wire reports
An antibiotic made by French drug maker Sanofi-Aventis may reduce some symptoms when asthma worsens but it does not improve breathing capacity, according to a study financed by the drug company. The study, published in last week's New England Journal of Medicine, found that 278 adults who took the antibiotic telithromycin -- sold by Sanofi-Aventis under the name Ketek -- for 10 days after their attacks showed a drop in asthma symptoms.
SPORTS
June 20, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Jerome Williams believes the breathing problems that forced him to be hospitalized after Monday night's 31/3-inning start against the San Francisco Giants were caused by "a mixture of asthma and anxiety. " The right-hander rejoined the Angels on Wednesday but was put on the 15-day disabled list to clear a roster spot for Jered Weaver , who returned from a lower-back strain to start against the Giants. Williams, who passed out in the clubhouse Monday night and was taken by ambulance to UCI Medical Center in Orange, was released Tuesday and returned to the hospital for more tests Wednesday.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Score one for man's best friend. For folks who start to sneeze and wheeze as soon as they enter a dog owner's home, new research may come as a surprise: Dust from households with dogs may help protect against an asthma-related respiratory infection, according to results presented Tuesday at this year's General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. Previous research has pointed to the idea that sharing space with cats and dogs could actually be beneficial to the immune system.
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