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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
So much for the Astrodome's new lease on life. Voters rejected a countywide ballot measure Tuesday that would have raised more than $200 million to restore the domed stadium in Houston and turn it into a multipurpose event center. Prop. 2 failed by a vote of 53% to 47%. A major challenge for preservationists hoping to save the stadium was that there is no obvious long-term tenant for the building, even in renovated form. The Astros now play baseball in a downtown stadium called Minute Maid Park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Now that voters have rejected a plan to save the Houston Astrodome, a marvel of engineering muscle and space-age glamour and easily the city's most important building, it would be easy to conclude that modern architecture has a major image problem in this country. That idea is underscored by the sad fate of Prentice Women's Hospital in Chicago, a striking clover-shaped concrete tower designed by Bertrand Goldberg that Northwestern University has begun demolishing to make room for a $370-million biomedical research center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
HOUSTON - Forget Monticello or the Chrysler building: There may be no piece of architecture more quintessentially American than the Astrodome. Widely copied after it opened in 1965, it perfectly embodies postwar U.S. culture in its brash combination of Space Age glamour, broad-shouldered scale and total climate control. It also offers a key case study in how modern architecture treated the natural world - and how radically the balance of power in that relationship has shifted over the last half-century.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- The Astrodome, once lauded as the "Eighth Wonder of the World," may soon be a landmark of the past. About 53% of voters Tuesday rejected a ballot measure that would have paid to renovate the country's first air-conditioned domed stadium.  The nostalgic value of the now rusty Dome, shuttered in 2009, may have been lost on new voters in Houston and surrounding Harris County, which adds about 10,000 residents a month and is now home...
SPORTS
September 12, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER
Opponent--Houston Astros, three games. * Site--Astrodome. * Tonight--5. * TV--Channel 5 today, Saturday and Sunday. * Radio--KABC (790), KWKW (1330). * Records--Dodgers 81-65, Astros 73-72. * Record vs. Astros--3-5. DODGERS' CHAN HO PARK (13-6, 3.31 ERA) vs. ASTROS' SHANE REYNOLDS (6-10, 4.42 ERA) * Update--This is the start of a seven-game trip that includes two in St. Louis and a two-game showdown in San Francisco next Wednesday and Thursday.
SPORTS
August 7, 1986 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
The words were spoken more in anger than prophecy, but Karen Matuszek had heard in advance from her irritated husband what would transpire at Dodger Stadium Wednesday. Fair warning, however, was not given to the Houston Astros. Len Matuszek waited until the game to put the drop on the Astros with the first two-homer game of his career, punctuating the Dodgers' 7-4 win before a crowd of 40,709.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Talbot Wilson, who went into the outfield of the new Houston Astrodome to shag fly balls after players complained that the light was so poor they couldn't see the baseball, died Saturday of unannounced causes. Wilson, 74, was a chief designer of the Astrodome. When the indoor arena opened in 1965 and baseball players complained that the skylights diffused the sunlight so much they couldn't see fly balls, Wilson checked out the complaints himself before ordering alterations.
SPORTS
September 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
Mark McGwire went one for four with a single Friday night, remaining at 62 home runs in the St. Louis Cardinals' 8-2 loss to the Houston Astros before 52,186 at the Astrodome, the second-largest crowd in the stadium's history. McGwire, who has five homers against the Astros this year, is homerless in nine at-bats since hitting the record-breaking No. 62 off Chicago's Steve Trachsel Tuesday in St. Louis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2003 | Dennis Mclellan, Times Staff Writer
Sidney Shlenker, the flamboyant entrepreneur who once owned the Denver Nuggets and was chief executive of the Houston Astrodome's parent company, has died. He was 66. Shlenker, who suffered a spinal-cord injury in a 1998 highway accident that left him a paraplegic, died of heart failure Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Before his accident, he had created an eclectic corporate profile over four decades.
SPORTS
April 11, 1999 | MICHAEL A. LUTZ, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
They could have used shovels for the groundbreaking, but this called for Texas flair. The guests fired Colt .45 pistols into a vacant lot, marking the start of Harris County Domed Stadium, otherwise known as the Astrodome. The man behind the project, Judge Roy Hofheinz, modestly suggested the stadium be dubbed the Eighth Wonder of the World. That was 34 years and several facelifts ago. Now the Astrodome is losing its oldest tenant.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
So much for the Astrodome's new lease on life. Voters rejected a countywide ballot measure Tuesday that would have raised more than $200 million to restore the domed stadium in Houston and turn it into a multipurpose event center. Prop. 2 failed by a vote of 53% to 47%. A major challenge for preservationists hoping to save the stadium was that there is no obvious long-term tenant for the building, even in renovated form. The Astros now play baseball in a downtown stadium called Minute Maid Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
HOUSTON - Forget Monticello or the Chrysler building: There may be no piece of architecture more quintessentially American than the Astrodome. Widely copied after it opened in 1965, it perfectly embodies postwar U.S. culture in its brash combination of Space Age glamour, broad-shouldered scale and total climate control. It also offers a key case study in how modern architecture treated the natural world - and how radically the balance of power in that relationship has shifted over the last half-century.
SPORTS
September 11, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Like many great romances, Major League Baseball's love affair with AstroTurf was born in experimentation, applied in desperation and appreciated best in moderation. Now comes its expiration. After five decades in which artificial grass was often as ubiquitous - and in some places as loathed - as the designated hitter, professional baseball is going natural. Where once a dozen stadiums featured faux fields, this season there are only two: Toronto's Rogers Centre, where the Angels will finish a three-game series Thursday, and Florida's Tropicana Field, home of the Tampa Bay Rays.
NATIONAL
September 16, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Ramona Watson knew ahead of time that her family had to leave the Astrodome, where they had taken refuge two weeks earlier, but that didn't make it any easier to pack up their meager belongings, collect her children and mother and head off Thursday to yet another shelter. Along with the remaining 3,600 New Orleans evacuees at the Astrodome and Reliant Center, the family walked several hundred yards to the Reliant Arena, a concrete-floor venue for rodeos and livestock shows.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Ronald S. Smith Sr., pastor of the New Mount Calvary Missionary Baptist Church, had a lot to smile about Wednesday: Through his efforts, a mother and son made homeless by Hurricane Katrina and separated ever since were reunited and no longer homeless. Mother and son became separated in the panicky evacuation of the Superdome in New Orleans and had been searching for each other without success for two weeks. Carl Coleman, 14, had been living in a downtown Houston shelter.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The first call for help was made at 3 a.m. Aug. 31 to Robert Eckels, chief executive of Harris County. On the line was a familiar voice: Jack Colley, head of the Texas office of the Department of Homeland Security. Colley gave Eckels disturbing news: Hurricane Katrina was still assaulting Louisiana and Mississippi and tens of thousands of evacuees were stranded in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans. The governor of Louisiana was pleading with Texas Gov. Rick Perry for help.
SPORTS
September 4, 1988 | MICHAEL L. GRACZYK, Associated Press
If the Houston Astrodome was the brainchild of flamboyant Judge Roy Hofheinz, the 40,000-light scoreboard that spanned nearly 500 feet of the stadium's back wall could be seen as the twinkle in his eye. The judge is long gone -- banished from the dome by financial problems and felled by illnesses that eventually cost him his life. And now the famed scoreboard -- with its snorting bull, lighted flags and blazing cowboy pistols -- soon will be just a memory.
SPORTS
August 6, 1989
Early in the 1971 baseball season, pitcher Jerry Reuss, a 21-year-old left-hander with the St. Louis Cardinals, faced the Houston Astros in the Astrodome, his first start in the stadium. Recalling the game, Reuss told USA Today: "I couldn't even get out of the first inning. I loaded the bases, then gave up a grand slam." The player who hit the grand slam won a new car, as part of an Astro promotion. The following year, Reuss was traded to Houston.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators have authorized an unusual radio station to serve the estimated 10,000 evacuees living in the Houston Astrodome, part of an effort to fill the information void left by Hurricane Katrina's disruption of communications services along the Gulf Coast. The Federal Communications Commission over the weekend granted Houston relief volunteers and media organizers permission to build a 30-watt radio station inside the Astrodome.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Roderick Tureaud, 33, a pipe welder by trade and the father of twin girls, spent his morning Monday in a tent outside the Astrodome filling out job applications and calling prospective employers. It was Labor Day, traditionally a time to celebrate the value of work. Tureaud and his wife, Rhodesia, 31, hope for a more personal celebration -- by finding a job for him and a school for her to continue nursing studies. There is also the problem of finding child care for Robin and Raven, both 3.
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