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NEWS
February 4, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frightened by a soothsayer's forecast, Indians by the hundreds of thousands slept out under the stars Saturday, worried that yet another earthquake would catch them and kill them in their homes. The quake that struck Jan. 26, which was among the most lethal in India's history, claimed at least 16,403 lives in the west of the country, left an estimated 600,000 homeless and caused more than $4.5 billion in property loss.
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NEWS
December 29, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
College professor Nguyen Ngoc Hung had spent nearly three decades searching for the remains of his brother, who died at age 20 fighting U.S. troops. Hung had scoured battlefields in Vietnam's Central Highlands and talked to military commanders and pored through archival records, always coming up empty-handed. Finally, in desperation, he went to a psychic here and explained his grief. "This is easy," Pham Thi Hang said. "I can help."
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | EDWARD J. BOYER and GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
So, you knew the election would be close, but you never expected this back-and-forth vote with recounts and computer glitches? Those who see meaning in the stars say they saw it coming. The culprit? The planet Mercury, which began its apparent retrograde--or backward--movement in the heavens for the last time this year on Oct. 18 and ended it at 9:22 p.m. EST on election day.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soothsayers of all breeds may be coming out of the woodwork to claim credit for predicting the presidential cliffhanger. But none were more prescient than a pair of 8-inch-high pooches interviewed by The Times almost four months ago. Rachel and Hannah, a pair of miniature pinschers, are described as psychic dogs by their owner, Jacqueline Stallone (Sylvester's mom).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2000 | DAVID LANSING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nikki has some gypsy in her. You can see it in her eyes that look sad and serious, even when she is laughing. She is from New Orleans, which she pronounces with only two syllables--N'or-lins. She talks about New Orleans as if it were a city she just barely escaped. A place that can grab you by the ankles and suck you under, like quicksand.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM
In the early '90s, Cadillac Tramps were the most popular attraction on the O.C. grass-roots club scene. Its quaking bluesy grooves, scorching guitars and a distinctive, rumbling but rubbery sound that front man Mike "Gabby" Gaborno called "the forbidden beat"--were the musical attractions. The songs often gave wry accounts of street life, their sardonic view reflecting the band members' common background as former drug abusers who saw music as an alternative to self-destruction.
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gene Emery makes one prediction at the beginning of every year and it's almost always correct. Here's his statement for 1999: All the psychics will be wrong. In fact, that's the same prediction Emery issues every year. As a science writer and regular contributor to the Skeptical Inquirer, he's been tracking the predictions of supermarket tabloid psychics for more than two decades. He's not impressed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1998 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Ojai you can drive a car or you can drive a Carmen. The difference is as blatant as the tribal geometrics festooning the body, the painted lizards and chile peppers on the hood, the Mayan astrological signs, the rainbow of swirls and spirals, the touch of the artist Carmen Abelleira-White as opposed to the brush of the auto painter Earl Scheib. Last year there were no Carmens. Now half a dozen ply the lanes and highways of the art-conscious town.
SPORTS
July 16, 1998 | MARK HEISLER
It's hard to get a fix on the globe-enthralling, hooligan-beset World Cup, which, depending on what you read, was either exhilarating, dangerous, unforgettable or unmemorable. For sure, it was zany enough. The New York Times' Jere Longman remembers, "Glen Hoddle, the English coach, hired a faith healer. The Romanian players dyed their hair gold. Miroslav Blazevic, the eccentric Croatian coach, got through the tournament on cigarettes, chocolates and faxes from his astrologer."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1997 | SUSAN KARLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most Sundays, you can find Rabbi Shlomo Schwartz among the Tarot card readers, fortunetellers and incense sellers on the Venice Beach boardwalk with a booth of his own: "Jewish Astrology." If you miss the sign, he's unmistakable: a jovial 51-year-old man with a long beard who answers to the nickname "Schwartzie" and who sports a tie-dyed T-shirt and a baseball cap bearing the words "Grateful Yid."
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