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NEWS
June 6, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Mae C. Jemison of West Los Angeles, the first black woman to be selected for the nation's astronaut corps, says she wants to be known as "just another astronaut," but that if she becomes a role model for other black women aspiring to join the nation's space agency, that's OK too. Jemison, 30, was named on Friday by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to join 14 other individuals in the first class of astronaut trainees chosen by the space agency since the Jan.
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NATIONAL
November 11, 2009 | Sarah Lundy and Willoughby Mariano
Former astronaut Lisa Nowak turned to face the woman she was accused of attacking nearly three years ago after driving 1,000 miles across country: Colleen Shipman, who sat in the front row of a packed Florida courtroom. "I am sincerely sorry for causing fear and misunderstanding and all the intense public exposure you have encountered," Nowak said. Then Orange County Circuit Court Judge Marc Lubet accepted Nowak's guilty plea of burglary of a car, a third-degree felony, and misdemeanor battery.
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NEWS
May 27, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Sally K. Ride, the first American woman to fly in space, will quit the astronaut corps in August and join Stanford University's Center for International Security and Arms Controls, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said Tuesday. The surprise announcement from NASA headquarters came as Ride, 36, neared the end of a much-anticipated study on the long-range future of the U.S. space program and nearly four years after her history-making orbital flight aboard the shuttle Challenger.
OPINION
June 30, 2006
Re "Abort this mission," editorial, June 29 I disagree with your editorial urging NASA to ground the space shuttle. Such a proposal shows an ignorance of the benefits of manned space travel. Although robots have their uses, they lack the flexibility of human spaceflight: the ability to explore on a hunch, to perform any needed in-flight repairs and to engage in the time-honored tradition of "going where no man has gone before." Your editorial sends the wrong message to the astronaut corps, the families of those astronauts who have died in the performance of their missions and the young people who want to become astronauts.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
She's a chemical engineer from Stanford. A medical doctor from Cornell. Formerly a physician for Peace Corps volunteers in West Africa. A doctor for CIGNA in Los Angeles. Now Mae Carol Jemison, who spent her early youth in the black neighborhoods of Chicago's south side, is about to become a U.S. astronaut, the first black woman to do so. But don't expect her to tell you she's going to be anyone's role model.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1988
Shareholders of Apple Computer Inc., Cupertino, have elected former astronaut Sally K. Ride as a director. Ride, 36, who resigned from the astronaut corps in September, 1987, and is now a science fellow at the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University, was elected to a one-year term on the six-member board.
NEWS
March 8, 1987 | United Press International
NASA will begin interviewing a second group of prospective astronauts this week in the space agency's first effort to expand the astronaut corps in more than a year, officials said Friday. The group of 22 applicants, including five women, will spend a week at Johnson Space Center undergoing interviews, testing and indoctrination, NASA said.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The strains of "Danny Boy" awakened Columbia commander Dan Brandenstein on his 47th birthday today, and a chorus of "Happy Birthday" filled the cabin as the shuttle circled Earth 200 miles in space. The astronaut corps serenaded him, and basketball star Larry Bird radioed congratulations as the shuttle's five-member crew settled in for another day of scientific experiments on the eighth day of the 10-day mission. "Congratulations to you and the crew on the slam dunk with LDEF.
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | Associated Press
Twenty-two candidates for the astronaut corps will be interviewed next week at Johnson Space Center in the final round of a selection process, a National Aeronautics and Space Administration official said Friday. Four or five other groups of people, totaling 80 to 100, will be interviewed later. From all of these, spokesman Jack Riley said, "about a dozen" will be selected this summer to join the current group of 84 astronauts.
NEWS
September 29, 1988
Capt. Frederick H. Hauck, USN Hauck, 47, will serve as Discovery commander. A native of Long Beach, he now lives in Winchester, Mass. He is the father of two children. Hauck joined the astronaut corps in 1978 and has flown on two previous shuttle flights, logging 339 hours in space. A former Navy test pilot, he flew 114 combat and combat support missions in Southeast Asia and among other decorations has received the Distinguished Flying Cross.
OPINION
July 8, 2004
Re "NASA Needs a New Mission," editorial, July 3: Once again, your editorials are emphasizing the Luddite approach to spaceflight. You forget that NASA is structuring a program that will find the balance between human and robotic space exploration. The incentive of prizes to encourage [privately funded spaceflight] ought to be encouraged. In aviation's early days such prizes were given by newspapers, wealthy individuals and aeronautics clubs. NASA should encourage similar efforts today by the contemporaries of those organizations and concentrate on returning the space shuttle to flight as soon as it is safe to do so. The International Space Station should be finished, and the experience in long-term spaceflight gained from the ISS will serve NASA and international partners well in the next human spaceflight endeavor: the return to the moon and a human landing on Mars.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The strains of "Danny Boy" awakened Columbia commander Dan Brandenstein on his 47th birthday today, and a chorus of "Happy Birthday" filled the cabin as the shuttle circled Earth 200 miles in space. The astronaut corps serenaded him, and basketball star Larry Bird radioed congratulations as the shuttle's five-member crew settled in for another day of scientific experiments on the eighth day of the 10-day mission. "Congratulations to you and the crew on the slam dunk with LDEF.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Columbia's crew used the shuttle's 50-foot robot arm Saturday to inspect a broken heat-shield tile, worked to fix a balky experiment and exercised for medical research. Shuttle commander Daniel C. Brandenstein, co-pilot James D. Wetherbee, and mission specialists Bonnie J. Dunbar, Marsha S. Ivins and G.
NEWS
September 29, 1988
Capt. Frederick H. Hauck, USN Hauck, 47, will serve as Discovery commander. A native of Long Beach, he now lives in Winchester, Mass. He is the father of two children. Hauck joined the astronaut corps in 1978 and has flown on two previous shuttle flights, logging 339 hours in space. A former Navy test pilot, he flew 114 combat and combat support missions in Southeast Asia and among other decorations has received the Distinguished Flying Cross.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1988
Shareholders of Apple Computer Inc., Cupertino, have elected former astronaut Sally K. Ride as a director. Ride, 36, who resigned from the astronaut corps in September, 1987, and is now a science fellow at the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University, was elected to a one-year term on the six-member board.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
She's a chemical engineer from Stanford. A medical doctor from Cornell. Formerly a physician for Peace Corps volunteers in West Africa. A doctor for CIGNA in Los Angeles. Now Mae Carol Jemison, who spent her early youth in the black neighborhoods of Chicago's south side, is about to become a U.S. astronaut, the first black woman to do so. But don't expect her to tell you she's going to be anyone's role model.
OPINION
June 30, 2006
Re "Abort this mission," editorial, June 29 I disagree with your editorial urging NASA to ground the space shuttle. Such a proposal shows an ignorance of the benefits of manned space travel. Although robots have their uses, they lack the flexibility of human spaceflight: the ability to explore on a hunch, to perform any needed in-flight repairs and to engage in the time-honored tradition of "going where no man has gone before." Your editorial sends the wrong message to the astronaut corps, the families of those astronauts who have died in the performance of their missions and the young people who want to become astronauts.
NEWS
June 11, 1986 | Associated Press
Adm. Richard Truly, a former astronaut who directs the space shuttle program, said today that the Challenger explosion would not have happened if he and others had been told about erosion of booster rocket seals on the second shuttle flight, which he piloted in 1981. "The failure to communicate this erosion problem or to consider its severity was one of the causes of the accident," Truly told the House Committee on Science and Technology. He said he learned only after the Jan.
NEWS
June 6, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Mae C. Jemison of West Los Angeles, the first black woman to be selected for the nation's astronaut corps, says she wants to be known as "just another astronaut," but that if she becomes a role model for other black women aspiring to join the nation's space agency, that's OK too. Jemison, 30, was named on Friday by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to join 14 other individuals in the first class of astronaut trainees chosen by the space agency since the Jan.
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Sally K. Ride, the first American woman to fly in space, will quit the astronaut corps in August and join Stanford University's Center for International Security and Arms Controls, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said Tuesday. The surprise announcement from NASA headquarters came as Ride, 36, neared the end of a much-anticipated study on the long-range future of the U.S. space program and nearly four years after her history-making orbital flight aboard the shuttle Challenger.
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