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November 24, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Astronauts tinkered with a troublesome piece of equipment designed to help convert urine and sweat into drinkable water, which is vital to allowing the International Space Station crew to double to six. Station Cmdr. Michael Fincke and space shuttle Endeavour astronaut Donald Pettit changed how a centrifuge is mounted in a urine processor, which is part of the newly delivered $154-million system. The centrifuge helps separate water from urine. The astronauts have been trying to get the system running for four days, but the processor has worked for just two hours at a time before shutting down.
May 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
NASA on Thursday introduced a class of 11 astronauts, a group that includes three teachers who are giving up the classroom for the chance to fly into space. The teachers, selected from a field of more than 1,000 applicants, will live, work and train with more than 100 other astronauts at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. The new astronauts could be scheduled for space flights by 2009. No teacher has flown on a shuttle since Christa McAuliffe, who died in the 1986 Challenger explosion.
April 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Seven astronauts arrived in Cape Canaveral for the launch of the space shuttle Columbia on a mission to probe the human brain and nervous system. Columbia, the oldest of NASA's four space shuttles, is scheduled to blast off from its launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center at 11:19 p.m. PDT Thursday. "Hopefully, we'll have some good weather coming up on Thursday," Columbia's commander Richard Searfoss told reporters after arriving at the Florida spaceport.
April 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Computer trouble prevented astronauts from steering the international space station's new giant robot arm with a 1 1/2-ton load and resulted in a cascade of other problems. Communication between the space station and Mission Control was disrupted, and an orbit-raising maneuver by the docked space shuttle Endeavour was put on hold. NASA bumped the robot-arm workout to Thursday to give engineers more time to solve the underlying computer problem.
December 27, 1999 | Associated Press
The crew of space shuttle Discovery packed up its tools Sunday and prepared to return home after an eight-day mission of repairs to the Hubble Space Telescope that NASA declared a success. Discovery was scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center at 2:21 p.m. PST today. The mission was cut short by launch delays and included several tough repairs. In addition, one of four scheduled spacewalks had to be canceled.
June 11, 1991 | From Associated Press
The astronauts toiling in space shuttle Columbia's medical laboratory expressed surprise Monday at how their bodies were reacting after nearly a week of weightlessness. "We're going to have a lot of fun the next few months and years putting together a very different picture of what happens when people go into space," astronaut F. Andrew Gaffney said during a television interview.
October 28, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Rocketdyne employees had a chance Monday to put faces to the mission for which they are working to assemble a new solar-powered energy system to be used in the International Space Station. Six astronauts, five of whom are to lift off next summer to begin the early phases of construction of the space station, met with hundreds of workers at Rocketdyne's Space Power Electronics Laboratory.
May 30, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Astronauts heading to Mars would face exposure to a deluge of radiation, in some cases as much as NASA policy permits, according to new data from the Curiosity rover. The space agency limits astronauts to a 3% increased risk of fatal cancer. This translates to different levels of radiation exposure, depending on an astronaut's age and gender. But according to a paper published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, radiation exposure in a nonstop round-trip to Mars, which would take about a year, would ring in at about 662 millisieverts.
March 27, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
On a day when U.S. astronauts tested jet packs for their first spacewalk at the Mir station, Shannon Lucid said Tuesday that she is happy to do her share of housekeeping but graciously brushed off suggestions by her Russian hosts that women are born to clean. Lucid, a 53-year-old biochemist who will be aboard the aging Russian space outpost for nearly five months, became an official member of the Mir crew this week after the shuttle Atlantis docked with the Russian spacecraft.
February 13, 1997 | Reuters
The crew of the space shuttle Discovery on Wednesday flexed the spacecraft's robot arm, checked their spacesuits and said they were ready for a $350-million service call on the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Final preparations were underway to retrieve the telescope early this morning and start a four-day series of spacewalks to refurbish and vastly improve it.
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