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WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Lax U.S. gun regulations are enabling the international trafficking of high-powered weapons and fueling the spread of gun violence in Latin America and the Caribbean, the Council on Foreign Relations argues in a report urging President Obama to take action on initiatives that have foundered in Congress. More than 70% of the 99,000 weapons recovered by Mexican law enforcement since 2007 were traced to U.S. manufacturers and importers, the council report said, citing data from the eTrace program of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
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NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano
The head of the Drug Enforcement Administration has acknowledged to congressional investigators that her agency provided a supporting role in the ill-fated Operation Fast and Furious run by the group's counterparts at the ATF. Michele M. Leonhart, the DEA administrator, said DEA agents primarily helped gather evidence in cases in Phoenix and El Paso, and in the program's single indictment last January that netted just 20 defendants for illegal gun-trafficking....
NATIONAL
March 3, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
A federal operation that allowed weapons from the U.S. to pass into the hands of suspected gun smugglers so they could be traced to the higher echelons of Mexican drug cartels has lost track of hundreds of firearms, many of which have been linked to crimes, including the fatal shooting of a Border Patrol agent in December. The investigation, known as Operation Fast and Furious, was conducted even though U.S. authorities suspected that some of the weapons might be used in crimes, according to a variety of federal agents who voiced anguished objections to the operation.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Even as they lost scores of illegal firearms in their Fast and Furious operation, federal ATF agents asked their Border Patrol counterparts not to pursue criminal leads or track gun smuggling in southern Arizona so they could follow the firearms themselves, and senior Homeland Security agents “complied and the leads were not investigated,” according to a new Department of Homeland Security inspector general's report. The report, obtained Thursday by The Times, also said that a Homeland Security special agent on the border was collaborating with the ATF in Fast and Furious, but his “senior leaders” in Arizona never read his updates about fundamental flaws with the failed gun tracking operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1994
Congratulations on your editorial "A Rebuke to the Government" (March 1). It was appropriate but did not go far enough. All law is force. Behind each law is the bayonet. How many Wacos lie behind the Brady bill and other proposed plans designed to disarm law-abiding citizens? In spite of Atty. Gen. Janet Reno's rhetoric to the contrary, the chapter on Waco is not closed and won't be closed until she resigns and the ATF and FBI officials responsible are brought to justice.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
U.S. authorities in Mexico charged with stemming the flow of U.S. weapons to drug cartels have been hampered by shortfalls in staffing, agents with limited Spanish skills and the difficulty of recruiting new agents to the dangerous posting because they can't officially carry weapons, current and former staff members say. Facing new accusations that investigators with the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives allowed buyers to...
NEWS
September 8, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
In the second violent crime in this country connected with the ATF's failed Fast and Furious program, two Arizona undercover police officers were allegedly assaulted last year when they attempted to stop two men in a stolen vehicle with two of the program's weapons in a confrontation south of Phoenix. The officers, members of an elite Arizona Department of Public Safety law enforcement unit, said the driver rammed their cars and threatened them with the firearms, and then fled into the Arizona desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1991
This is in response to "Raid Terrifies Orange Family" (Aug. 29). The article describes as victims the family of Henry Truong, a Vietnamese-born, American-educated electrical engineer, whose members were terrorized by an early-morning "storm trooper"-style raid on their home Aug. 28 by (federal) agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. It appears that, although these agents obtained a search warrant, it was only after their raid was over that they discovered that the people they were after (former tenants)
NATIONAL
March 22, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
Manuel Celis-Acosta, the chief suspect in the ATF's "Fast and Furious" investigation who was caught but released at the U.S.-Mexico border in May 2010, was also stopped and released two months earlier while in possession of a Colt .38-caliber pistol purchased illegally under the gun-tracking operation. The revelation that officials twice declined to arrest their prime suspect shows that agents were keenly aware of Celis-Acosta's activities yet repeatedly turned down opportunities to charge him with felony offenses and bring a quick end to the Fast and Furious probe.
NATIONAL
August 8, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Kim Murphy
OAK CREEK, Wis. -- Wade Michael Page, the man investigators say killed six people and critically wounded three others at a Sikh temple Sunday before dying in a shootout with police, did not appear dangerous when he bought a handgun at a shop last month, the shop owner says. Kevin Nugent, owner of the Shooters Shop, about eight miles southwest of Milwaukee in West Allis, Wis., told The Times that Page came looking for a handgun on July 28. “He asked about a 9 millimeter,” Nugent said Tuesday.
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