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December 22, 1997
The Dec. 16 editorial, "That Smell at the ATF Is More Than Gunpowder" is erroneous and unjust. It does a disservice to the dedicated and caring employees of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms who work to protect the public by fairly enforcing the often complex federal firearms laws. Any dissatisfaction with those laws should be addressed in the political process, not by making unfair attacks on career public servants. There is no basis for the allegations that there is a "rogue operation" at ATF or that ATF has a "penchant for rubber-stamping assault weapon permits."
April 15, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The investigation into a federal operation that allowed Mexican drug cartels to acquire U.S. weapons escalated Thursday with new revelations that an Arizona gun dealer repeatedly expressed fears that his guns were falling into the "hands of the bad guys" but was encouraged by federal agents to continue the sales. A series of emails released by congressional investigators showed that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives encouraged the gun dealer against his better judgment to sell high-powered weapons to buyers he believed were agents for the drug cartels.
August 8, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Kim Murphy
OAK CREEK, Wis. -- Wade Michael Page, the man investigators say killed six people and critically wounded three others at a Sikh temple Sunday before dying in a shootout with police, did not appear dangerous when he bought a handgun at a shop last month, the shop owner says. Kevin Nugent, owner of the Shooters Shop, about eight miles southwest of Milwaukee in West Allis, Wis., told The Times that Page came looking for a handgun on July 28. “He asked about a 9 millimeter,” Nugent said Tuesday.
March 9, 1994
Congratulations on your editorial "A Rebuke to the Government" (March 1). It was appropriate but did not go far enough. All law is force. Behind each law is the bayonet. How many Wacos lie behind the Brady bill and other proposed plans designed to disarm law-abiding citizens? In spite of Atty. Gen. Janet Reno's rhetoric to the contrary, the chapter on Waco is not closed and won't be closed until she resigns and the ATF and FBI officials responsible are brought to justice.
February 28, 2011
Violence along the U.S.-Mexico border continues to spiral upward, with all-too-frequent reports of bullet-ridden bodies turning up on street corners, in parks, on deserted highways, even at quinceaneras . A complex combination of drugs, corruption and poverty may be behind the bloodletting. But the source of the weapons used to kill is easily identified: The U.S. accounts for an estimated 85% of guns seized by Mexican authorities, according to a 2009 Government Accountability Office report.
September 8, 1991
This is in response to "Raid Terrifies Orange Family" (Aug. 29). The article describes as victims the family of Henry Truong, a Vietnamese-born, American-educated electrical engineer, whose members were terrorized by an early-morning "storm trooper"-style raid on their home Aug. 28 by (federal) agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. It appears that, although these agents obtained a search warrant, it was only after their raid was over that they discovered that the people they were after (former tenants)
March 21, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Even as they lost scores of illegal firearms in their Fast and Furious operation, federal ATF agents asked their Border Patrol counterparts not to pursue criminal leads or track gun smuggling in southern Arizona so they could follow the firearms themselves, and senior Homeland Security agents “complied and the leads were not investigated,” according to a new Department of Homeland Security inspector general's report. The report, obtained Thursday by The Times, also said that a Homeland Security special agent on the border was collaborating with the ATF in Fast and Furious, but his “senior leaders” in Arizona never read his updates about fundamental flaws with the failed gun tracking operation.
November 10, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Tribune Washington Bureau
A much-touted federal effort to keep U.S. firearms out of the Mexican drug wars is unwieldy, mismanaged and fraught with "significant weaknesses" that could doom gun smuggling enforcement on the border to failure, an internal Justice Department review concluded Tuesday. Agents with the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives focus only on small gun sales and do not share information with law enforcement officials on both sides of the border, the review said.
March 8, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
U.S. authorities in Mexico charged with stemming the flow of U.S. weapons to drug cartels have been hampered by shortfalls in staffing, agents with limited Spanish skills and the difficulty of recruiting new agents to the dangerous posting because they can't officially carry weapons, current and former staff members say. Facing new accusations that investigators with the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives allowed buyers to...
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