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BUSINESS
February 12, 2003 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
Faced with a $4.66-million jury verdict and millions more in attorney fees, Newport Beach sports agent David Dunn has filed for bankruptcy protection. Dunn, who runs Athletes First and is considered one of pro football's most effective contract negotiators, filed for Chapter 11 protection Monday because he intends to appeal the jury verdict but doesn't have the assets to secure the bond, company attorney Mark Humenik said.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 2003 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
Faced with a $4.66-million jury verdict and millions more in attorney fees, Newport Beach sports agent David Dunn has filed for bankruptcy protection. Dunn, who runs Athletes First and is considered one of pro football's most effective contract negotiators, filed for Chapter 11 protection Monday because he intends to appeal the jury verdict but doesn't have the assets to secure the bond, company attorney Mark Humenik said.
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SPORTS
November 16, 2002 | Sam Farmer
Show him the money! A Los Angeles jury awarded NFL super-agent Leigh Steinberg $44.6 million in damages Friday after ruling that his former business partner, David Dunn, conspired to heist his high-profile clients. Steinberg, for years viewed as an idealist who brought a human touch to an otherwise soulless industry, now has a courtroom victory -- and a shredded reputation. There was a time Steinberg was the most powerful agent in football.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2003 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
A judge told sports agent Leigh Steinberg: No piling on. Capping the first round of a bitter legal fight, Los Angeles federal Judge Ronald S.W. Lew on Friday denied a request from Steinberg's Newport Beach sports agency to essentially shut down his former protege David Dunn's rival firm, Athletes First. Lew also denied a motion to sock Dunn and his company with an additional $23.5 million in penalties for "unjust enrichment."
BUSINESS
November 16, 2002 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
Sports super-agent Leigh Steinberg won a decisive victory Friday when a jury awarded his Newport Beach firm $45 million after finding that a former protege unfairly started a rival agency and stole away some of football's biggest names.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2003 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
A judge told sports agent Leigh Steinberg: No piling on. Capping the first round of a bitter legal fight, Los Angeles federal Judge Ronald S.W. Lew on Friday denied a request from Steinberg's Newport Beach sports agency to essentially shut down his former protege David Dunn's rival firm, Athletes First. Lew also denied a motion to sock Dunn and his company with an additional $23.5 million in penalties for "unjust enrichment."
BUSINESS
November 12, 2002 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
He was the most persistent job seeker the firm had ever seen. He telephoned continually, had friends and family send unsolicited letters of praise and underscored his determination by writing a mock Sports Illustrated story -- his smiling face on the cover -- predicting his success. More than anything, Brian G. Murphy wanted to be a sports agent.
SPORTS
November 16, 2002 | Sam Farmer
Show him the money! A Los Angeles jury awarded NFL super-agent Leigh Steinberg $44.6 million in damages Friday after ruling that his former business partner, David Dunn, conspired to heist his high-profile clients. Steinberg, for years viewed as an idealist who brought a human touch to an otherwise soulless industry, now has a courtroom victory -- and a shredded reputation. There was a time Steinberg was the most powerful agent in football.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2002 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
Sports super-agent Leigh Steinberg won a decisive victory Friday when a jury awarded his Newport Beach firm $45 million after finding that a former protege unfairly started a rival agency and stole away some of football's biggest names.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2002 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
He was the most persistent job seeker the firm had ever seen. He telephoned continually, had friends and family send unsolicited letters of praise and underscored his determination by writing a mock Sports Illustrated story -- his smiling face on the cover -- predicting his success. More than anything, Brian G. Murphy wanted to be a sports agent.
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