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SPORTS
December 13, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polo, that ancient sport for man and horse first played in Persia more than 2,500 years ago, is undergoing a renaissance among the date palms and tumbleweeds of the Coachella Valley. The United States Polo Assn. has been celebrating its 100th anniversary this year and as a climax, an all-star match of Hall of Fame caliber players--the Polo Master of the Masters--will field two teams of all 10-goal players on Sunday at the Empire Polo Club in Indio.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By James Rainey
For 27 straight summers, all that stood between runners and completion of the Badwater Ultramarathon was 135 miles of asphalt, a 13,000-foot elevation gain and late July temperatures that soared to 120 degrees and above. They called it "the toughest foot race in the world. " And not too many people argued. But this summer, the race from the depths of Death Valley to the shoulders of Mt. Whitney has been moved, while the National Park Service conducts a "safety assessment" of the run and other athletic events.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1993 | JEFF McDONALD
Serious and casual athletes will have the opportunity to raise money forlocal charities Saturday when the Muscular Dystrophy Assn. hosts a "Roll & Stroll" in Westlake and the American Cancer Society sponsors "Making Strides Against Cancer" in Camarillo. The MDA fund-raiser asks people to run, walk or bike a 5-K, 10-K or a 20-mile route to raise money for the mid-state chapter, which includes Ventura County.
SPORTS
January 17, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 The Los Angeles Unified School District has instructed its schools to cancel outdoor athletic events scheduled for Friday because of air-quality concerns with the fire in Glendora, according to district athletics spokesman Trent Cornelius. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
SPORTS
June 21, 1997 | PAIGE A. LEECH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fewer than 48 hours before the start of the 30th annual L.A. Watts Summer Games--the nation's largest high school athletic competition--Kevin Boucher of Sherman Oaks gears up for another "respond-and-react" day of preparation. Boucher (pronounced Boo-shay), director of projects for the Los Angeles Junior Chamber of Commerce which puts on the event, skips breakfast and starts his day with a cup of coffee. "I'm not an eater," he says. "Especially with all this going on."
SPORTS
April 5, 2002 | From staff reports
City Section athletic events will resume next week whether the school bus drivers' strike has been settled or not, according to Willie Crittendon, administrator of school operations and safety. Since Tuesday, all athletic events have been postponed because of the strike. Crittendon said alternative transportation means are being considered to continue the season, possibly by Tuesday.
SPORTS
July 19, 1991
Archery Jay Barrs of Mesa, Ariz., and Denise Parker of South Jordan, Utah, finished with a series of bull's-eyes to win the preliminary rounds. Barrs, the 1988 Olympic gold medalist who turned 29 Wednesday, closed with 12 consecutive bull's-eyes from 30 meters and finished with 1,320 points out of a possible 1,440. Scoring a personal high of 339 from 50 meters, he was the top scorer from three of four distances.
SPORTS
January 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The California State University system is banning alcohol from basketball games and other intercollegiate athletic events. The policy, which was announced Thursday but took effect last month, prohibits the 23 CSU campuses from selling alcoholic beverages at any intercollegiate athletic events in university owned or operated facilities. Some campuses have existing contracts with vendors allowing alcohol sales, but once those expire they will not be renewed.
SPORTS
July 7, 1990 | MIKE HISERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state of Minnesota has put its best foot forward. The question is, will the sports world be willing to dance? It is a $70-million gamble. That's how much has been spent during the past three years on the construction and renovation of athletic facilities around the state. The U.S. Olympic Festival, which began Friday and runs through July 15, is the first of several potentially lucrative events that have been attracted to the Twin Cities area. The U.S.
SPORTS
September 12, 2001
BASEBALL: All 15 major league games scheduled for Tuesday postponed. Future games undetermined. BOXING: Felix Trinidad vs. Bernard Hopkins middleweight championship bout Saturday night at Madison Square Garden. COLLEGE: Most athletic events at UCLA, USC and colleges nationwide. Pacific 10 football games, including UCLA-Arizona State at the Rose Bowl on Saturday, and four major-college football games. GOLF: Thursday's starts at world championship and two other tournaments postponed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | Frank Shyong
The 2015 Special Olympics World Summer Games will be the largest sporting event to hit Los Angeles since the 1984 Olympics -- a logistical enterprise that seems impossible when you walk into the organizing committee's office downtown. About a dozen employees work out of the donated space, a cluster of empty cubicles strewn with half-opened boxes of business cards and printers that haven't been plugged in yet. But in two years, a full-time staff of 160 and an estimated 30,000 volunteers will put on competitions throughout Los Angeles for more than 7,000 athletes in an event that will bring an estimated $415 million to the regional economy.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Authorities in Southern California went on a heightened state of alert after Monday's Boston Marathon bombing, beefing up security at Los Angeles International Airport, Dodger Stadium and other venues where crowds congregate. Law enforcement officials said they took the steps to reassure the public while guarding against the possibility of potential attacks related to or inspired by the Boston bombings that left at least three dead and dozens injured. LAX, the target of the failed 1999 millennium bomb plot, immediately stepped up police patrols and employed additional bomb-sniffing dogs in and around terminals and parking areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant and Andrew Blankstein
Los Angeles authorities said Tuesday they planned more vigilant security for the foreseeable future in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings. The violence sparked outrage by some Los Angeles leaders. L.A. Council President Herb Wesson called out those who planted the bombs Tuesday. "I don't know what these monsters believe that they are going to accomplish. But when we have horrific acts of violence like yesterday it only brings us closer as a nation," Wesson said in the L.A. City Council chambers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein
There was a moment of silence at the beginning of Monday's Dodgers game to honor the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing. The stadium was on heightened alert, with the Los Angeles Police Department adding extra patrols. The Dodgers organization turned off the scoreboard during the memorial. Security was being tightened across Southern California, at airports, on public transportation and at other large venues. Law enforcement officials said they took the steps to reassure the public while guarding against the possibility of potential attacks related to or inspired by the Boston explosions that left at least three dead and dozens injured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein
From Los Angeles International Airport to Dodger Stadium , L.A. officials said they will be on heightened alert because of the Boston explosions. LAX officials said they are increasing patrols, beefing up checkpoints and using more bomb-sniffing dogs. "While there is no information to suggest that there is any nexus to the Los Angeles area, in an abundance of caution, Airport Police has increased its presence at LAX, LA/Ontario International and Van Nuys airports by deploying bomb-detection canines, additional patrol officers and security personnel," L.A. World Airports said in a statement.
HEALTH
November 3, 2012 | Chris Woolston
Anywhere someone is lifting a weight, strapping on a football helmet or lacing up running shoes, there's probably a big bottle of green, blue or neon orange liquid nearby. Gatorade, Powerade and other sports drinks have drenched just about every sport in America, from triathlons to pee-wee soccer. But sports drinks are also popular with spectators in the stands, kids playing video games, long haul truckers and office workers. Lots of people chug down sports drinks without ever breaking a sweat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By James Rainey
For 27 straight summers, all that stood between runners and completion of the Badwater Ultramarathon was 135 miles of asphalt, a 13,000-foot elevation gain and late July temperatures that soared to 120 degrees and above. They called it "the toughest foot race in the world. " And not too many people argued. But this summer, the race from the depths of Death Valley to the shoulders of Mt. Whitney has been moved, while the National Park Service conducts a "safety assessment" of the run and other athletic events.
SPORTS
April 11, 2002 | From staff reports
High school track meets scheduled for Friday in the City Section will take place after buses were secured by the Los Angeles Unified School District to transport teams during the bus drivers' strike. Since April 2, all athletic events had been postponed or canceled. All varsity athletic contests scheduled for Monday also will be played with bus transportation.
SPORTS
June 26, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Here's a novel way to break a tie to determine which woman should be the third representative of the U.S. in the 100-meter dash at the Summer Olympics in London: Mud wrestle. At least that's what Justin Gatlin says. At the U.S. Olympic trials over the weekend, Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh finished in a tie for third in the women's 100 meters. Unfortunately, only the top three make it to the Olympics, meaning one of the two won't be competing in London. But which one? While Felix and Tarmoh get together with their advisors to determine whether they should compete in a runoff or flip a coin, Gatlin, who won the men's 100 meters and will be going to London, appeared on ESPN's SportsCenter and floated his idea.
OPINION
October 9, 2010
Athletes vs. cars Re "Triathlon takes 2,800 runners across the city," Oct. 4 I'm a former triathlete and marathon runner, and have experienced the fun of having the city shut down major arteries so that I could run through my favorite neighborhoods. More recently, I've seen these races from the other side ? that of the frustrated motorist. I've completely revised my view of the competitions. Sunday is simply no longer the sleepy do-nothing day. It's asking too much of thousands of drivers to know about a triathlon in advance, check the Internet and change their routes and schedules to accommodate 2,800 athletes.
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