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Athletic Misconduct

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October 6, 2007 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Former Olympic track and field superstar Marion Jones pleaded guilty Friday to federal criminal charges that she lied to investigators about using steroids before her five-medal performance at the 2000 Summer Games in Sydney, and about her involvement in an unrelated New York-based counterfeit check scheme. The admission that she used steroids, made in U.S. District Court in White Plains, N.Y., represents a fall from grace for a woman who was once among the most celebrated athletes in the world.
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SPORTS
August 4, 2011 | Baxter Holmes, Kevin Baxter and Jim Peltz
Buried deep within the soul of every sport is a select group of traditions that are followed religiously. Whenever a competitor feels he's been wronged, these eye-for-an-eye creeds demand retribution. So, of course, after Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Takashi Saito hit St. Louis Cardinals star Albert Pujols on the left hand Tuesday, St. Louis was going to hit back. And Cardinals reliever Jason Matte did, the next inning, hitting Milwaukee All-Star Ryan Braun in the back. He was just following the game's long-standing retaliatory rule: Throw at somebody.
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SPORTS
August 3, 1995 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alabama, with the third-winningest program in major college football history, was placed on three years' probation and severely penalized after the NCAA Committee on Infractions found the school guilty of unethical conduct and "a distressing failure of institutional control."
SPORTS
February 25, 2010 | By Lance Pugmire
A British rugby player's blood sample emerged this week as a landmark case, the first positive result for human growth hormone in testing by a national sporting anti-doping agency. The athlete, Terry Newton, confessed to using the banned substance and Wednesday, after being slapped with a two-year ban from the game, publicly apologized for his "grave error in judgment." Newton's positive test is expected to be followed shortly by others, a source familiar with worldwide doping programs told The Times on Wednesday.
SPORTS
November 6, 2001
It's too early to write off the Clippers' season. Lamar Odom doesn't get that same benefit. He has failed. He let down his team, his fans, himself. When the Clippers need someone to take their hand and guide them in the right direction, their best player will wander off into a minimum five-game suspension for violating the league's anti-drug program, the NBA announced Monday. That's twice now.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2003 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
Can diamonds be a guy's best friend? Just days after being charged with sexually assaulting a hotel employee in Colorado, Kobe Bryant gave a purple diamond ring worth a reported $4 million to his wife, Vanessa. The Laker star commissioned the 8-carat ring from Rafinity, a Santa Monica jeweler on the Third Street Promenade that caters to a celebrity clientele. The couple picked up the ring earlier this week.
SPORTS
March 28, 1997 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for two Fresno State basketball players alleged to have shaved points for friendly gamblers this season said a Times story Wednesday that quoted bookmakers and others on the purported scheme was "trumped-up garbage." "I find it a little bit incredulous that someone would say they now have more than a rumor when what [The Times did is] quote an anonymous illegal bookie and that bookie is saying he or she has a reliable source. Is that a reliable source?"
SPORTS
June 2, 2000 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wayne Merino, who guided the Lakewood Artesia High boys' basketball team to three state championships and national prominence, will not return as coach of the Pioneers, and Artesia will forfeit all games and championships for the 1997-98 and 1999-2000 school years, the superintendent of the ABC Unified School District said Thursday.
SPORTS
February 13, 1995 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the strongest anti-doping actions ever taken, China was banned Sunday from the Pan-Pacific Swimming Championships. Meeting in Honolulu, the Pan-Pacific Swimming Assn. charter members--Australia, Canada, Japan and the United States--voted 3-1 not to invite China to their meet in Atlanta this August. The decision was fueled in part by the recent spate of positive drug tests of Chinese athletes, including seven swimmers.
SPORTS
February 12, 1995 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After breaking the world record in the 10,000-meter run in 1993, Wang Junxia was sensitive to accusations that she and fellow Chinese women runners had used anabolic steroids to help their remarkable rise in international sport. "China has an old saying," Wang said then. " 'If you've done nothing wrong, then you don't fear the ghost crying out at the door; if you stand upright, then you don't fear the crooked shadow.' " But fear is something Chinese sports officials have in abundance these days.
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | By Baxter Holmes
The NCAA committee that will meet beginning Thursday to determine the fate of USC athletics will do more than hear testimony, look at the evidence investigators have gathered and ponder the university's response. It will also consider precedent -- past cases with similarities to whatever findings it makes concerning allegations that star football and men's basketball athletes received benefits in violation of college rules. "We try to be consistent," Paul Dee, chairman of the NCAA Committee on Infractions, said recently.
SPORTS
January 2, 2010 | Mark Heisler
The NBA started the new decade in lockdown as league officials and Washington, D.C., law enforcement agencies investigated a report that Wizards teammates Gilbert Arenas and Javaris Crittenton drew pistols and pointed them at each other in an argument in the dressing room at the Verizon Center. CBS Sports had previously reported that D.C. police were investigating reports that Arenas and Crittenton had brought guns into the dressing room. Arenas acknowledged he had three pistols in the safe in his locker, saying he put them there to keep them away from his young children.
SPORTS
December 20, 2009 | Bill Plaschke
Once again, amid the kindling that has become the USC football program, "Fight On" is being drowned out by two other sounds. Cough, cough. More smoke here, strange smoke, scary smoke, stupid smoke, adding to a cloud that ensures the NCAA will keep looking for that illegal burn. Just some kid driving his girlfriend's car. Just another silly ember that could have been doused with a little more prudence and a little less arrogance. Is it really that hard to monitor some kid driving his girlfriend's car?
SPORTS
December 1, 2009 | Bill Dwyre
The news of the day is not that tennis fined Serena Williams. It is that tennis did something. For many, including this typist, the action was a shocker. Not the size of the fine, the existence of one. This is a sport that tiptoes around its superstars like lion trainers at the zoo during feeding time. Outbursts such as Williams' tirade of intimidation against a lineswoman in the semifinals of this year's U.S. Open usually send the mice in blazers scurrying to the basement. Tennis runs via a dysfunctional collection of Grand Slam officials, men's and women's tour officials, men's and women's tournament directors and players' agents.
SPORTS
August 25, 2009 | SAM FARMER
Are you ready for some football? Not as ready as Roger Goodell is, trust me. You might tire of all the non-football NFL news of the last several weeks, but at least you're not living it. The commissioner must long for the days when "Cable fight" meant trying to get the NFL Network in more households, not trying to pry apart Oakland Raiders coaches. Goodell is fond of saying the NFL is the "ultimate reality show," and who can argue? Not with every other story having to do with Michael Vick coming back, Plaxico Burress going away and Brett Favre doing a little of both.
SPORTS
August 19, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
The doubters are everywhere. Never mind that Albert Pujols has never been publicly linked to anything stronger than cough syrup. You just don't do what he has done and escape suspicion. Not now. Not after Manny Ramirez, Alex Rodriguez, David Ortiz, Roger Clemens and a finger-wagging Rafael Palmeiro "He hits the ball a long way and they're going to say, 'Ah-ha, I wonder.' And it is unfair," Dodgers Manager Joe Torre said. "There's no question it's unfair." Never mind that the St. Louis Cardinals slugger has never failed a drug test since mandatory testing went into effect.
SPORTS
January 13, 2003 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Tumult at the top of the United States Olympic movement -- a parade of leadership changes, incessant political infighting, allegations of doping scandals and, most recently, ethics-related controversies -- is triggering fears that American athletes will win fewer medals in 2004 and beyond. The U.S. led the medal count at the last two Summer Games and accounted for a team-record number of medals at the 2002 Salt Lake Winter Games. But turmoil in the U.S.
SPORTS
January 26, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Chicago circuit court judge Thursday reversed USA Volleyball's ban of a prominent youth coach who was expelled last summer for having sex with former UCLA star Julie Bremner and two others. Judge Michael Getty of Cook County ruled that USA Volleyball's standard for banning Rick Butler, owner and coach Sports Performance Club of West Chicago, Ill., was too vague in issuing a permanent injunction that allows him to coach again.
SPORTS
July 3, 2009 | Mark Medina
Dodgers left fielder Manny Ramirez will be going through uncharted territory when he returns to the lineup today after serving a 50-game suspension for testing positive for a banned substance. Phillies reliever J.C. Romero returned from his suspension June 3, but Ramirez is the first high-profile player to serve time under MLB's drug testing policy. Below is a look at six players who were publicly linked to performance-enhancing drugs, and how they fared afterward. Barry Bonds Position: LF How it went down: In December 2004, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Bonds testified before a BALCO grand jury in December 2003 that he used substances that he believed were an arthritis balm and flaxseed oil, but were actually an anabolic steroid and THG. In March 2006, the book "Game of Shadows" documented Bond's testimony and his use of performance-enhancing drugs while playing with the San Francisco Giants, including human growth hormone.
SPORTS
February 5, 2009 | BILL PLASCHKE
Even in a sports world with statistics spilling out of its hat like Larry Fitzgerald's hair, it's been quite the week for numbers. Football is celebrating six, the record number of Pittsburgh Steelers Super Bowl championships. Basketball is celebrating 61, the record number of points Kobe Bryant scored at Madison Square Garden. Baseball is, well, baseball, which means it's not celebrating numbers, but mourning them. They are 18.35 million and five.
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