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Athletic Recruiting Violations

SPORTS
April 30, 1999 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Fullerton, which hasn't had a winning men's basketball season since 1993, suffered another setback in its bid to rebuild its program Thursday. The NCAA put Fullerton on probation for four years and restricted the school from giving scholarships to community college transfers for three years for alleged infractions by the program in 1993 and '94, when Brad Holland was head coach. The NCAA also reduced by two the number of scholarships Fullerton can offer each of the next two years.
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SPORTS
April 30, 1999 | DIANE PUCIN
Finally. It's over. Nearly six years after alleged violations involving the Cal State Fullerton men's basketball program occurred, the NCAA announced the punishment. You know how punishment, to be effective, should be immediate? How when you're training that new puppy, the slap across the snout with the newspaper is supposed to happen as soon as the puppy goofs? Immediate in NCAA time apparently is six years. The punishment? Four years of probation.
SPORTS
April 29, 1999 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cal State Fullerton men's basketball program is expected to be put on NCAA probation today for recruiting infractions allegedly committed in 1993 and '94. The NCAA plans to announce a decision at 1 p.m. during a telephone press conference from its office in Overland Park, Kan. Probation of one to five years is normal in major infraction cases, which this has been classified. "Typically, that's the case," said Shep Cooper, NCAA director for the infractions committee.
SPORTS
November 30, 1998 | DIANE PUCIN
It is unfair, but it is also the way of the world sometimes. Too many people hear of Eddie Sutton and think only of the man forced to leave the University of Kentucky as a result of a nasty basketball scandal that was highlighted by the mysterious opening of an Emery express mail envelope in Los Angeles from which $1,000 in bills tumbled out, an envelope sent from the university to the father of high school star Chris Mills.
SPORTS
September 25, 1998 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Fullerton officials will appear today before the NCAA's Committee on Infractions in Atlanta, but it could be as long as two months before the university learns its fate in the investigation of its men's basketball program. Rebecca Wempe, the NCAA director for the infractions committee, said the eight-member group will discuss the case this weekend but will not inform Fullerton of its decision until a formal report is issued.
SPORTS
May 6, 1998 | LON EUBANKS
Cal State Fullerton has completed its response to NCAA allegations of violations in the Titan men's basketball program and submitted its findings to the NCAA. Judith Anderson, university executive vice president who oversees athletics, said Tuesday she has not been notified of a date for a preliminary hearing with the NCAA staff. Anderson said she expects the case to go before the NCAA committee on infractions at one of its regularly scheduled meetings in June or August.
SPORTS
May 1, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
One last rehash of a UCLA basketball crisis, then and now: On Nov. 6, 1996, the day UCLA fired Coach Jim Harrick for lying about an expense report and then trying to cover his tracks, then-Chancellor Charles E. Young scoured his brain for an analogy and came up with a humdinger. "I don't want to overstate it," Young overstated, "but I think Watergate is analogous." On Thursday, the NCAA put UCLA on three years' probation for violations during Harrick's tenure. Death penalty? Well, no.
SPORTS
May 1, 1998 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what was termed part "public lashing," and appeared to be part slap on the wrist, UCLA on Thursday was put on three years' probation by the NCAA Committee on Infractions for violations committed by its men's basketball program during Jim Harrick's regime as coach. Although committee chairman David Swank termed the violation of rules regarding recruiting, extra benefits and ethical conduct under since-fired Harrick as "major violations," the NCAA handed down only minor penalties.
SPORTS
April 30, 1998 | GREG SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The USC men's basketball program has been accused of paying $25,000 to a highly sought-after high school player from Ohio as an inducement to accept a scholarship, sources confirmed Wednesday, and the Pacific 10 Conference has said it is investigating. Sam Clancy Jr., an All-American from St. Edwards High in Lakewood, Ohio, last season, signed a letter of intent with USC in November and allegedly accepted the money as payment to play for the Trojans.
SPORTS
April 3, 1998 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Tarkanian is getting $2.5 million but no apologies from the NCAA, which ended its 26-year battle with the former Nevada Las Vegas coach by agreeing to the largest settlement or court-ordered award in NCAA history. About $750,000 to $1 million of the settlement will go toward Tarkanian's legal costs in the 1992 suit, which alleged that the NCAA unfairly conspired to force him out of college coaching.
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