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Atrial Fibrillation

NEWS
May 6, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For George Bush, more perhaps than any other recent President, a medical order to slow down could require a fundamental change not only in lifestyle but in the conduct of his presidency. Bush's play habits, his power walks, speed golf and "walleyball"--volleyball played off the walls of a racquetball court--have become well-known parts of his public image. More important, however, is the intensely "hands-on" style of his work habits.
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NEWS
May 9, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush stood by his beleaguered vice president Wednesday, declaring that Dan Quayle is "getting a bum rap" from critics in the wake of the President's recent hospitalization and asserting that his second-in-command is performing "a first-class job." "I don't know how many times I have to say it but I'm not about to change my mind when I see his performance and know what he does," Bush said. The President's remarks appear to be his most emphatic yet in support of the vice president.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans continue to doubt Vice President Dan Quayle's qualifications to be President, yet, despite President Bush's recent heart problem, few seem prepared to let those doubts seriously influence their vote in 1992, according to The Times Poll. The good news for Quayle and his backers is that only one in 14 Americans says that having Quayle on the GOP ticket would be the deciding factor in voting against Bush, and the President's illness has had little impact on that number.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No fun, no games. For President Bush, the image for the first day back from the hospital was that of a chief executive hard at work: doing the nation's business and not fooling around with his heart. "I feel all right. I've just got to get over and get back to work," Bush told reporters as he left Bethesda Naval Medical Center.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's doctors said Tuesday they believe they have found the cause of his recent heart irregularity--a mildly overactive thyroid gland that is expected to be easily treatable. In a briefing at Bethesda Naval Medical Center, Bush's chief physician, Dr. Burton Lee, said he was "pleased by this turn of events" because it cleared up questions about the cause of Bush's ailment and because such problems are "usually resolved within a short time."
HEALTH
September 19, 2005 | Hilary Waldman, Hartford Courant
This summer, Bevan Dupre got tired of feeling like a human time bomb. Like more than 2 million people in the United States, the Cheshire, Conn., teacher and former school administrator suffered from atrial fibrillation, a disorder in which the heart's upper chambers quiver instead of beating effectively. The condition, caused by a physiological short-circuit in the heart's electrical system, tends to come and go.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | Reuters
King Hussein has recovered from an irregular heartbeat and is expected to leave the hospital by today, palace authorities said Wednesday. The 56-year-old monarch was admitted Monday night to be treated for what doctors said was atrial fibrillation.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.) was in Inova Fairfax Hospital for observation, a spokesman said. Warner, 81, has suffered atrial fibrillation, which can cause an irregular heartbeat, since last fall, the spokesman said. Warner, a moderate Republican, recently said he would not seek a sixth term in November.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Barbara D. Mikulski, 68, was released from a hospital after being diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat, a spokesman said in Baltimore. Mikulski (D-Md.), the most senior woman in the Senate, was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, an irregular beating of the upper chambers of the heart.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | Associated Press
Former U.S. Sen. Paul E. Tsongas experienced a rapid heartbeat Friday and was transferred from a cancer hospital to a cardiac care unit, his doctor said. Tsongas, 51, was resting comfortably at Brigham & Women's Hospital after the brief episode. He had been undergoing treatment for a chemotherapy-related infection at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute since Dec. 10. "He is alert and without chest pain," said his physician at Dana-Farber, Dr. Tak Takvorian. "His blood pressure is normal.
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