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July 29, 2011
'Attack the Block' MPAA rating: R for creature violence, drug content and pervasive language Running time: 1 hour, 30 minutes Playing: At the ArcLight Hollywood
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz
In the annals of Texas journalism, Robert Heard stands out for many things: a biting wit, a prolific career, a lawyer's understanding of lawmaking, a determination to get the story even at considerable personal risk. It was the last trait that catapulted him from news reporter to news figure on Aug. 1, 1966, when he was shot in the shoulder during Charles Whitman's bloody rampage from the top of the University of Texas Tower in Austin. Heard, a 36-year-old Associated Press reporter, had followed two highway patrol officers on a wild sprint across a parking lot, but he forgot his Marine's training to zigzag.
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OPINION
February 19, 2012 | By Drew Westen
In poll after poll, Americans say they don't like negative campaigning. Yet in the final week of the Florida primary, more than 90% of the ads broadcast were attack ads. That's not likely to change in the run-up to Super Tuesday. So why do candidates rely so heavily on a kind of advertising voters say they abhor? Because it works. To understand why, you have to consider what we know about how emotions work - and the different ways our conscious and unconscious minds and brains process "negativity" during elections.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By David Willman
WASHINGTON - Amid concerns about its effectiveness and multibillion-dollar cost, the Department of Homeland Security has canceled plans to install an automated technology that was meant to speed the 24-hour operations of BioWatch, the national system for detecting a biological attack. The cancellation of the "Generation 3" acquisition was made Thursday at the direction of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, according to a memorandum circulated by Michael V. Walter, the BioWatch program manager.
WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
CAIRO -- Gunmen in the restive Sinai Peninsula killed one Egyptian soldier and wounded two others in an attack in the border city of Rafah near the Gaza Strip, Egyptian media reported Friday. It was unclear whether the attack was motivated by the military coup this week against President Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood party. The Sinai has long been plagued by violence and insecurity. Islamist groups, some with links to the Gaza Strip, frequently use the region as a launching pad for attacks against Israel, and fears are rising that Morsi's ouster will trigger a flare-up in violence.
OPINION
October 16, 2012
Re "Libya becomes a point of contention," Oct. 13 Let's assume there was a security error at the consulate in Libya. Still, the State Department likely had real-time information on what was happening at the consulate on Sept. 11 and knew it was a terrorist attack. So at a minimum you must assume that these facts were passed on to the president by the next day. From that point forward, the White House engaged in misdirection. When you are not telling the truth for political reasons and use others in your administration to assist in the misdirection, you have a president who places his own political fortunes ahead of the country.
WORLD
February 26, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A suicide bomber attacked a bus carrying Afghan army soldiers Wednesday morning in a western district of Kabul, wounding six of them and four civilians in the second security incident in the capital this week. As snow fell over the region, the bomber struck while soldiers were boarding an Afghan Defense Ministry bus in the Pul-e-Sokhta area of Kabul shortly after 7 a.m. The wounded were being treated at a hospital and are in stable condition, according to a statement from Kabul's police chief.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
Congressional leaders swiftly condemned the deadly attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, but defense hawks in particular said now is not the time to back away from supporting democratic efforts in the Middle East. "We are anguished and outraged," said a joint statement from three of the Senate's top defense leaders, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Sen. Joseph Lieberman, the independent from Connecticut. They called the slain U.S. ambassador, Chris Stevens, a friend.
NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- On Friday morning, a lone angry man walked up to an elementary school and attacked the most vulnerable people he could find, children ages of 6 to 11. It was almost the same scenario as in Newtown, Conn., except this was in Henan Province, China, and the attacker was armed only with a knife, not a gun. He injured 22 children, but nobody was killed. Comparisons between the Dec. 14 school attacks 7,000 miles apart are inevitable and provoking much comment on both sides of the Pacific.
WORLD
February 2, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez and Zulfiqar Ali
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Militants armed with rocket-propelled grenades, automatic rifles and suicide explosive vests launched a predawn raid on a Pakistani army camp in the country's volatile northwest Saturday, killing 23 people and injuring at least eight. The attack took place at a camp and checkpost in Lakki Marwat, a region just east of North Waziristan, the tribal area that the Pakistani Taliban, Al Qaeda and other militant groups continue to use as a primary base of operations, according to Pakistani security officials and local authorities.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Wednesday accused the United States of orchestrating the Ukraine crisis for geopolitical gain and warned that Russia will "certainly respond" if its interests in Ukraine are attacked. In an interview with state-run Russia Today television, Lavrov linked Vice President Joe Biden's visit to Kiev on Tuesday to the Ukrainian government's resumption of efforts to oust pro-Russia gunmen holding police stations and government buildings in a dozen towns and cities in eastern Ukraine.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Over a five-year period, a government-mandated tracking system in France showed that physicians in that country treated 1,979 patients for serious health problems associated with the use of marijuana, and nearly 2% of those encounters were with patients suffering from cardiovascular problems, including heart attack, cardiac arrhythmia and stroke, and circulation problems in the arms and legs. In roughly a quarter of those cases, the study found, the patient died. In the United States, when young and otherwise healthy patients show up in emergency departments with symptoms of heart attack, stroke, cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia, physicians have frequently noted in case reports that these unusual patients are regular marijuana users.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
A man was injured Tuesday night in a stabbing attack in Venice, police said. The victim was attacked around 8:30 p.m. in the 1600 block of Venice Way , just a short walk from the boardwalk, according to the Los Angeles Police Department. The victim's name was not released. He was believed to be in his 20s and was taken by paramedics to a hospital. "It does not appear that his wounds are life threatening," Officer Sara Faden said. The attacker or attackers fled the scene.
WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- A week after Pakistani militants refused to extend a cease-fire with the government, at least nine people, including five police officers, were killed and more than 30 wounded in two attacks in the country's restive northwest, officials said Tuesday. Officials said militants ambushed a police patrol in Bhadbare, on the outskirts of the provincial capital of Peshawar, late Monday night. Two police officials were wounded in the attack, and when other officers arrived at the site to retrieve the wounded, the attackers struck again, authorities said.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
If you think asteroid impacts are just the stuff of action movies, think again.  Since the year 2000, a powerful array of microphones has detected 26 nuclear-sized explosions in the Earth's atmosphere-- each the result of a space rock slamming into our planet. You can see where and when these impacts occurred, as well as how strong they were, in the video above. The new video was released by the B612 Foundation, a nonprofit that hopes to send a privately funded infrared telescope into space by 2018 to locate as many potentially dangerous asteroids as possible.  Most of us remain blissfully unaware of the pummeling the Earth gets on a regular basis because the force released by most asteroid impacts is absorbed entirely by our atmosphere and rarely causes much damage at ground level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
An 8-year-old was recovering Monday after suffering "significant wounds" and had "flesh ripped away" when three pit bulls attacked her in Santa Monica, authorities said.  Police responded to a call of a dog bite about 8 p.m. Sunday in the 1800 block of 21st Street. Moments before, the girl, her mother and a family cousin were visiting a neighbor close to the enclosed property, police said.  Once through the gate, one pit bull approached the girl and sniffed her. Seconds later, the pit bull was joined by two other dogs, who did the same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Ari Bloomekatz
Northern California police said Tuesday a transgender teenager who claimed he was beaten and sexually assaulted by three boys in a school bathroom has recanted his story. The 15-year-old transgender boy admitted he made a false report about an alleged Monday attack after investigators told him there was no evidence to back up his story, said Hercules Police Detective Connie Van Putten. “We were unable to substantiate any of the statements he made,” Van Putten said. Police found no injuries to the boy's head, face or hands to corroborate an attack, Van Putten said.
WORLD
April 19, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - On the first Sunday of March, China awoke to sickening news: Black-clad attackers with knives had hacked through crowds at the train station in the southern city of Kunming, killing 29 and injuring more than 140. Reporters leaped into action, gathering details from victims in their hospital beds. President Xi Jinping urged all-out efforts to investigate the slaughter. The incident was quickly dubbed "China's 9/11. " But by nightfall Monday, the state-run New China News Agency signaled that it was time to move on. "Kunming railway station serious violent terror case is successfully solved," its headline said.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - The political attack ad that ran recently in Arizona had some familiar hallmarks of the genre, including a greedy villain who hogged sweets for himself and made children cry. But the bad guy, in this case, wasn't a fat-cat lobbyist or someone's political opponent. He was a solar-energy consumer. Solar, once almost universally regarded as a virtuous, if perhaps over-hyped, energy alternative, has now grown big enough to have enemies. The Koch brothers, anti-tax activist Grover Norquist and some of the nation's largest power companies have backed efforts in recent months to roll back state policies that favor green energy.
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