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Attention Deficit Disorder

NEWS
November 18, 2010
James Franco has become a poster boy for multi-tasking (or possibly attention deficit disorder), famously plowing through four graduate degrees in the last year (three down, one to go) while continuing to make movies. Presently, he's enrolled at Yale, earning his doctorate in English and taking classes at the Rhode Island School of Design while zigzagging around the globe to promote "127 Hours. " And while Franco will happily chat up his studies or make the "Planet of the Apes" prequel last summer or star opposite a perverted puppet in David Gordon Green's upcoming movie "Your Highness," what really gets him going is his continuing involvement playing the deranged performance artist "Franco" on the daytime drama "General Hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1996 | LORI HAYCOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The other coaches in the league thought Stu Cahn was kidding when they saw the roster of players he had chosen for his new baseball team, the Pirates. He picked the shortest player. He picked a boy with autism and another with attention deficit disorder. He picked one of the only girls in the Los Alamitos Junior Baseball League. He also picked two of his three sons, because, in fact, Cahn had started the team for fear no one else would draft them. The team was the laughingstock of the league.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1994
UC Irvine's Child Development Center is looking for children who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to take part in a two-year research project. The $2.5-million study, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and National Institute of Mental Health, will look at different ways of treating the disorder. About 100 children between the ages of 7 and 9 are needed for the study.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
Following up on safety concerns about prescription drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, U.S. health officials announced Monday that the government was launching a two-year study to determine whether the medications posed heart risks for adults and children. Most ADHD medications are powerful stimulants that can increase blood pressure, and last year a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recommended stronger warnings for them.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | RANDI GOLDBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
High on marijuana, Quaaludes and alcohol, Ajax Ackerman left a party, got behind the wheel of a van and smashed into a telephone pole. He nearly died--and was sorry he hadn't. With the previous decade lost to addictions, the decade ahead looked hopeless too. Ten years later: At 41, Ackerman still has a flowing beard, hair tied in a ponytail reaching halfway down his back, two earrings in his left ear. He still goes by his nickname, after the warrior Ajax in a movie about street gangs.
SPORTS
January 27, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Tonya Harding's former husband talked to investigators for the first time for nearly six hours Wednesday, and a source said he was working out a plea bargain in exchange for testimony against the figure skater. Asked if Jeff Gillooly was there to implicate Harding in the attack on Nancy Kerrigan, FBI spokesman Bart Gori said: "They're asking the appropriate questions." Gillooly is expected to return to FBI headquarters for additional questioning today.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House said Monday that the federal government will intensify research on medications used to treat preschoolers for behavioral disorders, responding to growing concerns about the high number of youngsters who take prescription drugs such as Ritalin and Prozac.
HEALTH
January 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder receive more medical care than other youngsters for non-behavioral problems such as injuries, infections and asthma, Mayo Clinic researchers say. However, it is unclear from the findings whether such youngsters really have more such medical problems or are simply diagnosed more often because they get closer attention from doctors. The study looked at more than 4,000 children living near the Rochester, Minn., clinic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS
UC Irvine researchers are seeking children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to participate in what is expected to be a landmark study of treatments, including psychosocial methods and medication. Participants must be between 7 and 9 years old and must be considered to have the disorder by parents, school officials or other health and educational professionals.
SCIENCE
September 19, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
One-third of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder cases are linked to prenatal exposures to cigarette smoke or childhood exposures to lead, researchers reported Monday. The study, headed by researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, was the first to estimate the number of ADHD cases attributable to environmental toxins.
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