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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Joshua Dyer
There once was a girl who was bored out of her wits. It had been a wonderful holiday season, and she had received many fantastic gifts. However, she now sat in her Grandmother's kitchen watching the rain patter on her front lawn with nothing to do. "Nanna," she asked, "is there anything at all in your house that's fun?" Her wizened old Grandmother giggled under her breath and stood up from the kitchen table. "Follow me, sweet pea," she said in an inviting tone. She led the girl up a narrow set of stairs and into an old attic.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2011 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
During the run-up to its annual Halloween gala, the Magic Castle in Hollywood announced its theme for the night's shows: "For the last week in October, the Magic Castle will be ON FIRE with the spirit of Halloween!" said the website's special events calendar. In an unfortunate twist, a real fire broke out in the attic of the century-old Victorian about 12:35 p.m. Monday, possibly causing thousands of dollars' worth of damage, closing the venue for at least two days and displacing its popular Halloween night event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2011 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles firefighter died Friday from injuries he sustained when a ceiling collapsed on him in a house fire late Wednesday night in the Hollywood Hills. FOR THE RECORD: An article in the Feb. 19 LATExtra section about the death of Los Angeles Firefighter Glenn Allen said that Allen's funeral was tentatively planned for March 4. According to the Fire Department, his funeral is scheduled for Feb. 25 at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in downtown Los Angeles. "I don't think any of us as firefighters would expect such a catastrophic failure of ceiling," city Fire Chief Millage Peaks said after announcing the death of Glenn Allen, 61, an L.A. firefighter for more than 36 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | By Steve Harvey
When an electrician spotted an object under attic floorboards in the 168-year-old Workman House, he thought it might be a piece of cardboard or, worse, a desiccated mouse. But what Kirk Steinke found inside the City of Industry landmark was actually an old shoe. In fact, four old shoes — none matching — all worn by ladies. "I couldn't believe it," Steinke said. In more than four decades of delving into the innards of structures, he'd encountered troves of doorknobs, old newspapers, the occasional rodent "and flasks that men hide from women.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2010 | By Faye Fiore, Los Angeles Times
When Paul Brachfeld took over as inspector general of the National Archives, guardian of the country's most beloved treasures, he discovered the American people were being stolen blind. The Wright brothers' 1903 Flying Machine patent application? Gone. A copy of the Dec. 8, 1941, "Day of Infamy" speech autographed by Franklin D. Roosevelt and tied with a purple ribbon? Gone. Target maps of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, war telegrams written by Abraham Lincoln, and a scabbard and belt given to Harry S. Truman?
NATIONAL
February 16, 2010 | Chicago Tribune
Fire officials continued to seek the cause of a weekend apartment blaze that killed seven people, including four children. Assistant Fire Marshal Ron Opalecky of the Chicago suburb of Cicero said the blaze was believed to have started at a back porch early Sunday. Asked if it had been intentionally set, he replied, "Nothing has been ruled out." Investigators have talked to witnesses and are checking electrical equipment as well as heating and air conditioning units. Asked if smoking may have been the cause, he said, "Because of the extensive damage, it's going to be hard to conclude anything like that.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010 | By Dinah Lenney
In "Knitted," an essay in her new collection "Blessing of the Animals" (Eastern Washington University Press: 158 pp., $17.95 paper), Brenda Miller reflects on knitting lessons, Zen meditation and the Vermeer print that hangs on her office wall. "[K]nitting," she writes, "turns time into something that can be measured, shaped into something tactile, with heft and beauty and usefulness." Miller might as well be referring to her writing, which achieves a similar effect. Her essays appear in a variety of forms and voices on subjects ranging from stained glass to Greek myth; they detail landscapes that include a theme park in Utah, a city in the Middle East and a neighborhood in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2010 | By Claudia Luther
Miep Gies, who played a pivotal role in introducing to the world the poignant diary of the young Anne Frank and in relating the Frank family's failed attempt to hide from the Nazis, has died. She was 100. Gies died Monday after a short illness, according to an announcement on her website. No other details were provided. The scattered papers Gies gathered up after Anne and her family were taken from their hiding place in Amsterdam to concentration camps were later compiled by Anne's father into one of the most widely read nonfiction books of all time.
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