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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and Timothy M. Phelps
If you're not investigating high-speed stock trading, you're missing one of the hottest trends on Wall Street. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Friday that the Justice Department is examining high-frequency trading for possible violations of antitrust and insider-trading laws. When Justice Department investigators visit companies, they may bump into their compatriots from other state and federal agencies. The FBI disclosed this week that it is in the middle of a months-long probe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
Angela Spaccia, the $564,000-a-year deputy to the disgraced former city manager of Bell, was found guilty Monday of 11 felony counts related to her role in the corruption scandal, becoming the seventh official convicted of enriching themselves at the expensive of the working-class residents. Spaccia, the last figure in the Bell scandal to be convicted or enter a plea, was taken away in handcuffs after a jury rendered the verdicts in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom. Though she wept several times during her testimony, Spaccia showed no emotion when the verdicts were read, pronouncing her guilty of multiple counts of misappropriation of public funds, conflict of interest and secretion of public documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Robert L. Brosio, a retired federal prosecutor who supervised high-profile cases that included those against bank swindler Charles Keating Jr. and Los Angeles police officers who were involved in the beating of Rodney King, has died. He was 77. Brosio, who for 28 years led the criminal division of the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, had a massive pulmonary embolism in February, his daughter Serena Brosio said. He died Friday at a Pasadena hospital. While he seldom argued cases in court himself, Brosio was in charge of more than 100 prosecutors and set a standard of "ramrod integrity," said Nora Manella, an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Robert Rizzo, the former city manager of Bell who already has pleaded no contest to 69 corruption felonies, pleaded guilty Monday to federal tax charges in which he claimed more than $770,000 in phony losses, mostly on his horse ranch. Rizzo was dressed in a blue blazer and gray pants, as he has been for nearly all his court appearances. His hair, dyed brown when he was illegally receiving $1.5 million in annual compensation from Bell, is gray. He agreed last month to plead guilty to one count each of conspiracy to commit tax fraud and making a false income tax return.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Corina Knoll
Courtney Love, known for her brash behavior and four-letter words, won a landmark Twitter libel case Friday in which a Los Angeles jury determined the musician did not defame her former attorney in a tweet. Wearing a black dress, a cream cardigan and a string of pearls, Love was ecstatic outside the courthouse and kissed and hugged her attorneys. "It was a really great learning experience," she said, adding that she had avoided Twitter during the trial out of respect for the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris is the top prosecutor in the most populous state in the nation, but her counterparts in six other states, including Tennessee and Alabama were paid more last year, a state salary survey has found. The California attorney general's salary was also less than the pay received by the city attorneys of Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco and Sacramento. The survey was conducted by the staff of the California Citizens Compensation Commission in preparation for a meeting Thursday at which it will consider whether to provide pay raises to the governor, legislators, attorney general and other statewide constitutional officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Angela Spaccia's upcoming sentencing for her role in the Bell scandal could bring a first in the long-running corruption case - the testimony of Robert Rizzo. The former city administrator, who became a symbol of greed and government corruption, has never spoken publicly about the case. He pleaded no contest to 69 felony corruption charges last year rather than stand trial. But now, the attorney for Rizzo's former assistant said he would subpoena Rizzo in an effort to get him to reveal details of the wrongdoing in the small, working-class city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
The family of a Tustin man who was shot and killed by police last week say he was unarmed and suffering from depression and an anxiety attack when they called for help, an attorney for the family said. Tustin police received a call about a family disturbance at an apartment about 11:30 a.m. Feb. 10. When they arrived, police spokesman Sgt. Andy Birozy said, they were "immediately confronted with an adult male armed with a knife” -- later identified as Robert Villa, 23. The knife was recovered at the scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997
It seems that the Clinton administration's idea of assuring an independent attorney general is to keep her in the dark. FORREST BONNER Huntington Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A groundbreaking, two-month trial challenging teacher job protections in California concluded Thursday with both sides asserting that the interests of students are at stake. The case, Vergara vs. California, seeks to overturn a set of laws that affect how teachers are fired, laid off and granted tenure. The Silicon Valley-based group Students Matter brought the lawsuit on behalf of nine plaintiffs, contending that the regulations hinder the removal of ineffective teachers. The result is a workforce with thousands of "grossly ineffective" teachers, which disproportionately hurts low-income and minority students, attorneys said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
The Santa Monica City Council this week launched an effort to close all or part of the city's airport after July 2015 - a move that could result in years of additional court battles with the federal government. Council members voted 6 to 0 late Tuesday to develop and evaluate a strategy to scale back flight operations, cut the 5,000-foot runway by 2,000 feet and reduce aviation-related services, such as fuel sales and flight schools. The decision also calls for the city to consider converting airport land to low-impact non-aviation uses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Corina Knoll
It was a collision that rewrote the future of a young man: A football team captain on the verge of heading off to college would instead become a child-like invalid who struggled to tie his shoes. Edward Acuna was 17 when he took the field for Pomona's Garey High on an October night. In the fourth quarter, he sustained a helmet-to-helmet hit. When the defensive lineman eventually regained consciousness, he was partially paralyzed, was unable to utter simple words and had lost his short-term memory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lawrence E. Walsh, a former federal judge and Wall Street lawyer who spent a frustrating seven years as the independent counsel investigating misconduct by Reagan administration officials in the Iran-Contra affair, died Wednesday at his home in Oklahoma City after a short illness, his family said. He was 102. Walsh undertook the controversial job when he was 75 and semi-retired from a career that began in the mid-1930s, when he prosecuted racketeering in New York City. The Republican later was appointed to the federal bench, served as president of the American Bar Assn., and was No. 2 in President Eisenhower's Justice Department before spending two decades with the powerful law firm of Davis, Polk & Wardwell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
Federal authorities tried to get the son of a high-ranking Los Angeles County Sheriff's official to wear a wire in order to secretly record conversations with his father and then-Sheriff Lee Baca, according to the son's attorneys. This is the first indication that FBI agents tried to enlist deputies to record conversations with Baca as part of their ongoing investigation of inmate abuse and corruption inside the Sheriff's Department. Deputy James Sexton is one of seven current and former sheriff's officials who have been charged with obstructing the federal probe of the jails.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
Newsweek's blockbuster claim that it had found the creator of the bitcoin virtual currency is coming under intense scrutiny after a strongly worded denial by a Temple City man whom the newsmagazine dubbed "the face behind bitcoin. " Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto has hired a law firm and issued a statement late Sunday saying he wanted to "clear my name. " When the story was published in early March, Nakamoto, 64, found himself at the center of a media circus as well as a raging online debate about whether he was the programmer who invented the currency that has become a multibillion-dollar global phenomenon.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Florida teen Trayvon Martin was apparently chatting on a cellphone with his 16-year-old girlfriend when he was confronted -- and then killed -- by a self-appointed neighborhood watch captain. That call, says the attorney for the slain 17-year-old's family, is proof that the man did not fire in self-defense but was actually the aggressor. Martin's Feb. 26 shooting death has been propelled onto the national stage, fueled in part by social media outrage over the unfolding facts in the case.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Twenty-eight attorneys general from 24 states, three U.S. territories and Washington, D.C. are pressuring five retailers, including Walgreen Co. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc., to follow the move by CVS Caremark Corp. and end sales of tobacco.  CVS Caremark in early February announced it would stop selling cigarettes and other tobacco products. The pharmacy and retail chain, which has increased its business providing medical care through clinics, said "the sale of tobacco products is inconsistent" with its purpose.  Health advocates cheered the move and said it would probably spur other retailers to do the same.  The effort was spearheaded by Eric T. Schneiderman and Michael DeWine, attorneys general of New York and Ohio, respectively.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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