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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
OAKLAND -- The allegations in the cheerleaders' lawsuit are pretty straightforward: When it comes to working conditions for the Raiderettes, the Oakland Raiders routinely break California labor law. The women, who are professional dancers, earn less than minimum wage and are paid at the end of the season instead of every two weeks as required by California law. They earn $125 per game and are not paid for practices or meetings. They can be fined for being late to practice, or for not having the right hair color or for failing to appropriately polish their nails.
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BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
Newsweek's blockbuster claim that it had found the creator of the bitcoin virtual currency is coming under intense scrutiny after a strongly worded denial by a Temple City man whom the newsmagazine dubbed "the face behind bitcoin. " Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto has hired a law firm and issued a statement late Sunday saying he wanted to "clear my name. " When the story was published in early March, Nakamoto, 64, found himself at the center of a media circus as well as a raging online debate about whether he was the programmer who invented the currency that has become a multibillion-dollar global phenomenon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
Federal authorities tried to get the son of a high-ranking Los Angeles County sheriff's official to secretly record conversations with his father and then-Sheriff Lee Baca, according to the son's attorneys. This is the first indication that FBI agents tried to enlist deputies to record conversations with Baca as part of their ongoing investigation of inmate abuse and corruption inside the Sheriff's Department. Deputy James Sexton is one of seven current and former sheriff's officials who have been charged with obstructing the federal probe of the jails.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Twenty-eight attorneys general from 24 states, three U.S. territories and Washington, D.C. are pressuring five retailers, including Walgreen Co. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc., to follow the move by CVS Caremark Corp. and end sales of tobacco.  CVS Caremark in early February announced it would stop selling cigarettes and other tobacco products. The pharmacy and retail chain, which has increased its business providing medical care through clinics, said "the sale of tobacco products is inconsistent" with its purpose.  Health advocates cheered the move and said it would probably spur other retailers to do the same.  The effort was spearheaded by Eric T. Schneiderman and Michael DeWine, attorneys general of New York and Ohio, respectively.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Sentencing for former longtime Bell city administrator Robert Rizzo was postponed Wednesday but not before attorneys for the city and his former assistant said they intend to subpoena him to find out the inner details of the public corruption in the small Los Angeles County city. Rizzo, who remains free on bond, was ordered to return to court April 16, when it is expected he will be sentenced to 10 to 12 years in prison. Less clear is whether he will be permitted to serve the time concurrently with a federal sentence for filing false tax returns.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | Patt Morrison
At the top of the big whiteboard in his office, Andre Birotte Jr. has written "BHAGS," by which he means his aspirations as U.S. attorney for seven Southern California counties: "big hairy audacious goals. " He's already hit some audacious personal goals, this son of Haitian immigrants. He's made his way from the L.A. public defender's office to inspector general of the Los Angeles Police Department to private practice, and, since 2010, to chief of the most populous U.S. attorney's district in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Angela Spaccia's upcoming sentencing for her role in the Bell scandal could bring a first in the long-running corruption case - the testimony of Robert Rizzo. The former city administrator, who became a symbol of greed and government corruption, has never spoken publicly about the case. He pleaded no contest to 69 felony corruption charges last year rather than stand trial. But now, the attorney for Rizzo's former assistant said he would subpoena Rizzo in an effort to get him to reveal details of the wrongdoing in the small, working-class city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A disbarred attorney charged with stealing nearly $2 million from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority and more than $1 million from other clients was convicted Tuesday of grand theft and will be sentenced to a decade in prison. James Vincent Reiss, once a prominent lawyer for the MTA who defended the agency in multimillion-dollar lawsuits, pleaded no contest to two felony counts of grand theft. Reiss, 52, made the plea as part of a deal in which prosecutors agreed to drop nine other felony counts of theft, forgery and fraud.
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