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BUSINESS
February 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
At least 555 people -- including more than 100 children -- died in all-terrain vehicle accidents in 2006. Government safety officials expect the number to go much higher as they receive information from coroners and hospitals nationwide. The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimated that an additional 146,600 people were treated in emergency rooms for ATV-related injuries -- more than a quarter of them children. The industry contends it's not the ATV but the driver that's the problem.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Scott Gold
GROVER BEACH, Calif. - For a long time, even as hotels rose in nearby towns and posh homes went up along groomed fairways down the road, it seemed that this sleepy town might never move beyond an old real estate slogan: "Home of the average man. " Then Debbie Peterson ran for mayor. She was a real estate agent, a single mom and a free spirit, known to wear a business jacket with running shoes. She had moxie and business experience. Voters in 2012 chose her by a wide margin. They expected a jolt - but nobody expected this.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1987 | H.G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
In an internal report written last year, Honda Motor Co. attempted to show that its all-terrain vehicles were safe by arguing that more people died in 1984 in the United States from hunger and neglect than in accidents involving the company's three-wheeled ATVs, court testimony revealed Monday.
SCIENCE
July 1, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The numbers of kids 15 and under who got hurt riding all terrain vehicles (ATVs) went up 35% between 2001 and 2004 - but then fell 37% between 2004 and 2010, a team of researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Monday. It's unclear exactly why injuries dropped off, they said: Over the course of the decade, overall ATV use more than doubled, with an estimated 10.6 million four-wheeled ATVs in use in 2010. But even as the numbers of ATVs increased, fewer young people may have ridden the rugged, four-wheeled recreational vehicles as the decade wore on. During the economic recession of the mid-2000s, new ATV sales declined - and with them, perhaps, new riders.
SPORTS
August 20, 2010 | By Chris Foster
Take a stroll across the UCLA practice fields with tackle Sean Sheller and walk the length of a college football career in his cleats. Start at the north end, where the defensive linemen toil. This is where Sheller spent last season as practice fodder after a lifetime as an offensive lineman. Meander across the sun-baked synthetic turf to a spot between the two fields. This is where Sheller leaned on crutches in 2008 in the aftermath of an ATV accident that chewed up his left knee and cost him a starting job. Finally, head over to the offensive line pit at south wall.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Turkey's broadcasting watchdog said it has ordered a TV channel to stop airing the popular Japanese cartoon series "Pokemon" after two children jumped from balconies believing they had superhuman powers. The Radio and Television High Council also penalized private station ATV with a one-day blackout in response to a complaint by the Health Ministry, a council spokesman said. A 7-year-old girl and a 4-year-old boy were injured in falls from tall buildings in separate incidents last month.
NEWS
November 27, 1986
It was with mounting irritation that I read yet another article on the "dangers" of off-road, all-terrain vehicle use ("Putting the Brakes on Off-Road Cycle Use" by Allan Parachini, Nov. 11). One line of the article reads, "The crux is whether such vehicles can be safely operated or designed" (emphasis in article). Of course, that statement was never expanded on because, of course, they can be safely operated and designed. They are. The only points made referring to the danger of ATVs is that you should wear a helmet, you should not carry a passenger, you should not get drunk and ride and you shouldn't put your feet down to get run over by the rear wheels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2010
Elaine Koster Publisher with a knack for new talent Elaine Koster, 69, a publisher and literary agent with a knack for new talent who gave a second chance to an obscure horror writer named Stephen King and took on an unknown Khaled Hosseini and his novel "The Kite Runner," died Tuesday at St. Luke's Hospital in New York, according to Hosseini's publisher, Penguin Group (USA). The cause of death was not available. As publisher of the New American Library in the 1970s, Koster paid a then-enormous $400,000 for the paperback rights to King's "Carrie," which had sold poorly in hardcover, and was later credited with helping to make a blockbuster out of Erica Jong's "Fear of Flying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1987
The Times coverage of all-terrain vehicles was the most one-sided biased report I've seen from otherwise fine paper. Yes, injuries happen with them--and in skiing, boating, bicycling, hunting, etc. Try to find an active outdoor sport where injuries don't occur--there's no such thing. Your obviously negative slant made the enormous jump from "Gee, people can hurt themselves with ATVs" to "Golly, I guess we better ban them before anybody else gets hurt" mentality. Is that same narrow focus philosophy to be applied to all outdoor recreation?
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
After watching car sales slowly evaporate at his Suzuki Motor Corp. dealership, K.C. Heidler decided about five years ago to start offering Kia vehicles on his sprawling lot in Santa Ana. So it came as little surprise this week when Suzuki announced that it would abandon the U.S. car market but continue to sell its motorcycles and ATVs. "There was a weakening of Suzuki product and a lack of product," Heidler said, noting that he plans to take down the bright red "S" from the front of his Suzuki Depot dealership.
SPORTS
August 20, 2010 | By Chris Foster
Take a stroll across the UCLA practice fields with tackle Sean Sheller and walk the length of a college football career in his cleats. Start at the north end, where the defensive linemen toil. This is where Sheller spent last season as practice fodder after a lifetime as an offensive lineman. Meander across the sun-baked synthetic turf to a spot between the two fields. This is where Sheller leaned on crutches in 2008 in the aftermath of an ATV accident that chewed up his left knee and cost him a starting job. Finally, head over to the offensive line pit at south wall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2010
Elaine Koster Publisher with a knack for new talent Elaine Koster, 69, a publisher and literary agent with a knack for new talent who gave a second chance to an obscure horror writer named Stephen King and took on an unknown Khaled Hosseini and his novel "The Kite Runner," died Tuesday at St. Luke's Hospital in New York, according to Hosseini's publisher, Penguin Group (USA). The cause of death was not available. As publisher of the New American Library in the 1970s, Koster paid a then-enormous $400,000 for the paperback rights to King's "Carrie," which had sold poorly in hardcover, and was later credited with helping to make a blockbuster out of Erica Jong's "Fear of Flying.
SPORTS
January 19, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
If Kevin Pearce wasn't going to be able to take on icon Shaun White, well, then, his close friend and snowboarding colleague Danny Davis planned on shouldering the assignment. Now, Davis, like Pearce, won't be competing at the Winter Olympics next month in Vancouver. Like Pearce, Davis is injured and also in a hospital in Utah. Davis was scheduled to have surgery Monday night to repair his fractured vertebrae, having suffered the injury in a non-snowboarding accident early Sunday morning.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2008 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
"Got dirt?" That's the bumper sticker for the fast-paced, freewheeling lifestyle of all-terrain vehicles, or ATVs -- the most popular off-road vehicle around. The sticker is usually found on the windshield of a Ford or a Chevy or a Dodge that's packed with toys and headed out to nowhere.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
At least 555 people -- including more than 100 children -- died in all-terrain vehicle accidents in 2006. Government safety officials expect the number to go much higher as they receive information from coroners and hospitals nationwide. The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimated that an additional 146,600 people were treated in emergency rooms for ATV-related injuries -- more than a quarter of them children. The industry contends it's not the ATV but the driver that's the problem.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1985 | JESUS SANCHEZ
As a result of effort to refocus attention on its restaurant operations, ATV Systems of Santa Ana posted a third-quarter profit of $460,000 for the three months ended Dec. 31, reversing the $2-million loss it suffered in the year-ago period. Revenues for the maker of counter-top computers for restaurants edged up 4% to $7.5 million from $7.2 million. The small rise in revenue is "pretty good for us," said an ATV spokeswoman, when considering the company is now "very profit oriented."
BUSINESS
January 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
American Honda Motor Co. agreed to recall about 40,000 all-terrain vehicles after reports of a sticky throttle that may pose a risk of injury or death to riders. No injuries have been reported but the Torrance-based company has received two complaints. Consumers should stop using the vehicles immediately, the Consumer Product Safety Commission said. The federal agency expressed concern that water could enter the throttle-position sensor and freeze, leading to a loss of speed control.
AUTOS
September 5, 2007 | SUSAN CARPENTER
My wheels were rolling along, alternately sliding and gliding over sand, rocks and dirt. Across whoops and up hills. Down slopes and around corners. Only instead of two wheels, my ride had four. That's because my ride was an ATV, or all-terrain vehicle. Why was I riding an ATV when this column has been dedicated to motorcycles? Two reasons: If it's got a throttle, I'm game to check it out.
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