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Auction Block

NEWS
July 24, 2001 | LYNN PETRY, NEWSDAY
In the '60s, no surfing safari was complete without a "woody" (or woodie) station wagon parked on the beach, surfboards lashed to the roof The origins of this modern wood-trimmed wagon stem from early horse-drawn wagons. Later, wood was used for the framing and bodywork of early 20th century vehicles from cars to trucks. The first mass-produced wood-sided station wagon, a 1929 Ford, sold for $650.
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NEWS
August 15, 1985
Thirty-five luxury high-rise condominiums were auctioned for a total of almost $7 million in the largest such sale in Southern California, held Sunday at the financially troubled Monterey Island development in Glendale. Calling it "an enigma," Kimberly Young, representative of R. Thomas Ashley, the Newport Beach marketing firm that conducted the sale, said 13 of 48 units that went on the auction block did not sell. However, three of those sold later at minimum bids, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | By David Ng
The owner of Edvard Munch's "The Scream" has been revealed. Leon Black, the New York financier and head of the investment firm Apollo Global Management, is reported to be the person who paid $119.9 million for the highly coveted masterpiece. The Wall Street Journal first reported Wednesday that "several people close to the collector" confirmed Black's purchase. The version of "The Scream" sold at a Sotheby's auction in New York on May 2. The $119.9-million price set a record for the most expensive artwork sold at auction. Petter Olsen, the scion of a Norwegian shipping dynasty, had put the painting on the auction block.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A Chicken McNugget bearing a striking resemblance to founding father George Washington is still on the auction block and can be yours -- assuming you have about $8,000 lying around. Rebekah Speight of Dakota City, Neb., made headlines this week when she nearly sold the McDonald's favorite for $8,100 on Ebay . But the winning bidder -- who is either a devoted fan of the country's first president, a devotee of chicken McNuggets, or both -- chickened out.  Perhaps more surprising?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Studio props used in Paramount films dating back to 1916 will go on the auction block at Christie's gallery Dec. 16, to put them "in the hands of loving collectors and curators where they will be preserved for future generations." Paramount decided to clear out the 175 items because they are too fragile for further use. Altogether, the sale items have appeared in more than 100 Paramount films ranging from "The Making of Madelena" in 1916 to "Shanks" in 1974.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1989
Colt Firearms Up for Sale: Colt Firearms, maker of the gun that won the West, was put on the auction block, but the company's parent denied that a three-year struggle with striking workers prompted the decision. "It's a going business and it's profitable, and, of course, it has a history of quality products," said Michael G. Dunn, a spokesman for Colt Firearms' parent, Colt Industries. Dunn said senior officials at New York-based Colt Industries decided to sell the firearms division so they could concentrate on the company's aerospace, automotive and industrial service operations.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | From United Press International
Weyerhaeuser Co. announced Monday that it is selling its Arkansas-based gypsum wallboard business, even though the operation is profitable. The move is another in a series of sales by Weyerhaeuser to divest itself of what management believes are operations that "fall outside the company's desired strategic focus." Top executives of the timber giant announced at the April 20 shareholders' meeting that the company's portfolio would be reviewed and that many operations would be sold.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1993
I just read an article in the Los Angeles Times Business section ("With Liberty and Justice for Mickey," Nov. 12) about Walt Disney Co.'s plans to open a new theme park near Washington "that will pay homage to American history and culture." Disney promises to make historical events such as slavery, the Depression and the Civil War "fun and exciting for the whole family." It plans to somehow incorporate its well-known animated characters into the park. I can see it now: Minnie Mouse as a fun-loving slave on the auction block, Donald Duck quacking happily through the bread lines of the Depression, Snow White leading the Seven Dwarfs unscathed through the Battle of Gettysburg.
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