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Audio Visual Equipment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1999 | KATHLEEN O'STEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A revolution is underway in Hollywood's sound industry, but you have to be listening closely to hear it. As movie studios and post-production houses quietly make the transition from analog to digital equipment, film sound is getting clearer and, in some cases, louder because the new technology allows greater volume without distortion.
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MAGAZINE
September 26, 2004
Home-theater speakers are classed according to how they radiate sound. Conventional speakers, or direct radiators, send the sound out front. Dipole speakers and their variants (bipoles, quadripoles and omnipoles) radiate sound from at least two directions. For stereophiles, these dispersion characteristics are a matter of taste. In a home theater, they're more critical.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hottest thing in the music industry, aside from Carlos Santana, is a technology called MP3, which allows music lovers to download tunes from the Internet for free. Songs can then be played on a tiny machine that is less than half the size of a Sony Walkman. MP3 compresses audio files at nearly CD quality for easy transmission over the Internet. The technology is terrifying the record industry, because the files can be downloaded for free, meaning no sales for the big music companies.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Trans Com, an Irvine company that makes airline entertainment systems, said it has begun selling high-tech headphones that cancel aircraft noise and still allow passengers to listen to movie soundtracks or music. Sony Trans Com has already distributed about 50 sample copies of the headphones to airlines, which Sony hopes will buy the devices and offer them to first-or business-class passengers.
MAGAZINE
September 26, 2004 | David Lansing, David Lansing last wrote for the magazine about wines by the glass.
Other than the Cuban missile crisis and the assassination of JFK, the biggest event in my childhood was the day we got a color television. It was a Friday evening, late 1962. I can still see my dad pulling into the driveway in his pickup with the big walnut console RCA in the back. I was playing catch in the street and ran so hard to get home that I tripped going through some ivy in our front yard and ended up chipping my front tooth. But I didn't care.
MAGAZINE
September 26, 2004
Back in 1950, life was simple. DuMont dominated the television universe with its majestically sprawling, aptly named Royal Sovereign. It boasted a 30-inch screen, the largest black-and-white picture tube ever produced. It was the best TV on the market. Period. Now there is no "best," just a bewildering variety of choices: Will that be projection? Front or rear? Will that be flat screen? Liquid crystal display or plasma? Or would you prefer a good old cathode-ray tube?
BUSINESS
August 1, 1995 | MATTHEW HELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Williams has sold high-speed audiocassette duplicating machines to record companies around the world, from China to Canada. * In the process, the president of Gauss / Electro Sound has helped build the Sun Valley-based company into one of the world's leading players in a very specialized and crucial part of the music business. His machines, which cost up to $125,000, are used to mass-produce copies of music cassettes, and they can turn out an entire cassette in as little as seven seconds.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1987
Audiotronics in North Hollywood acquired another maker of audio-visual equipment, Leda Corp., for an undisclosed cash amount. Audiotronics makes audio-visual products used principally in education and training programs. Leda, with headquarters in Huntington Beach, produces specialized audio-visual equipment and is certified by the Defense Department to do electronics assembly, Audiotronics said.
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