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Audrie Krause

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BUSINESS
April 26, 1995 | MARTHA GROVES
The outspoken executive director of consumer group Toward Utility Rate Normalization plans to resign effective July 31. Audrie Krause, 47, a former reporter for the Fresno Bee, said she will look for a new job while serving as a consultant to TURN through year's end. "Careerwise, this is a good time to be thinking about moving on," she said.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 1995 | MARTHA GROVES
The outspoken executive director of consumer group Toward Utility Rate Normalization plans to resign effective July 31. Audrie Krause, 47, a former reporter for the Fresno Bee, said she will look for a new job while serving as a consultant to TURN through year's end. "Careerwise, this is a good time to be thinking about moving on," she said.
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BUSINESS
November 13, 1994
The article outlining alternative proposals to the state Public Utilities Commission's plan to deregulate the electric industry ("Proposals Add Confusion for State's Users of Electricity," Oct. 24) reflected the views of the utilities and environmentalists but left out the consumer viewpoint altogether. For the record, there is a consumer-led alternative to the PUC's plan: It is called Community Access to Competitive Electricity. Put forth by the consumer group Toward Utility Rate Normalization, community access would allow all Californians--not just the big guys--to share in the benefits of competition in the electricity marketplace.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1994
The article outlining alternative proposals to the state Public Utilities Commission's plan to deregulate the electric industry ("Proposals Add Confusion for State's Users of Electricity," Oct. 24) reflected the views of the utilities and environmentalists but left out the consumer viewpoint altogether. For the record, there is a consumer-led alternative to the PUC's plan: It is called Community Access to Competitive Electricity. Put forth by the consumer group Toward Utility Rate Normalization, community access would allow all Californians--not just the big guys--to share in the benefits of competition in the electricity marketplace.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
A reporter once asked consumer advocate Sylvia Siegel if she ever smiles. Siegel, whose no-nonsense demeanor masks an acute wit, frowned. "Of course," she replied. "Then smile," the reporter suggested. Siegel's face darkened. "I am," she said. That scene took place after Siegel had won a partial victory against Pacific Gas & Electric before the California Public Utilities Commission.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
TURN Calls on PUC to Change Diablo Canyon Rate: Calling unexpected profits from Pacific Gas & Electric Co.'s nuclear power plant "obscene," the consumer group Toward Utility Rate Normalization petitioned the California Public Utilities Commission to modify a 1988 rate settlement. "(T)he PUC approved this settlement as a way to protect PG&E customers if Diablo turned out to be a 'white elephant,"' not create extra profits, said TURN executive director Audrie Krause.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995 | Times Wire Services
A major consumer group has accused California regulators of violating the state's open-meeting laws by deliberating in secret on plans to open electricity markets to competition. Members of the California Public Utilities Commission denied the charges, which were made this week in a letter and public comment from Audrie Krause, executive director of Toward Utility Rate Normalization, at the commission's biweekly meeting.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL
Sylvia M. Siegel, who 16 years ago founded the San Francisco-based consumer organization known as TURN (from its formal name of Toward Utility Rate Normalization), has retired as executive director. Siegel was succeeded by Audrie Krause, who formerly wrote about public utility issues for the Fresno Bee and its parent, McClatchy Newspapers. Also joining TURN is Karen Miller, a former regulatory analyst for the California Public Utilities Commission.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1999
The groups backing the No Gatekeepers coalition must not be getting their Internet service from America Online ["Telecom Reins Belong in Hands of Local Citizens," Digital Nation, June 21]. If they were, they might realize their position benefits the marketing interests of the industry's foremost "gatekeeper." More than any other Internet service provider, America Online makes it difficult for users to get beyond the company's intranet "portal" and onto the actual Web. Unfortunately, the groups that comprise No Gatekeepers have allowed themselves to become pawns in the ongoing effort of the monopoly local telephone service providers to avoid opening their networks to competitors, as they were ordered to do under the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A consumer advocacy group Thursday asked the state Public Utilities Commission to fine Pacific Bell $50 million for improperly assessing late-payment and reconnect charges to thousands of California customers. San Francisco-based Toward Utility Rate Normalization (TURN) said the telephone company deliberately chose to delay processing customer phone-bill payments rather than hire additional staff to handle them.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
A reporter once asked consumer advocate Sylvia Siegel if she ever smiles. Siegel, whose no-nonsense demeanor masks an acute wit, frowned. "Of course," she replied. "Then smile," the reporter suggested. Siegel's face darkened. "I am," she said. That scene took place after Siegel had won a partial victory against Pacific Gas & Electric before the California Public Utilities Commission.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
G. Mitchell Wilk, a staunch proponent of telephone industry deregulation who was viewed by utility watchdog groups as a foe of consumers, said Wednesday that he will resign from the California Public Utilities Commission, effective Oct. 4. The departure of Wilk, 44, enables Gov. Pete Wilson to make his third appointment to the five-member regulatory body since taking office last January. His two earlier appointments were Norman D. Shumway and Daniel W. Fessler.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Public Utilities Commission on Wednesday allowed phone companies in the state to eliminate the itemized charge for touch-tone dialing service, beginning next February. However, consumer advocates immediately cautioned customers against concluding that touch-tone service--which allows easier access into electronic phone mail and other telephone information services--would be free.
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