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Augusta National Golf Club

SPORTS
August 23, 2003 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
You can still see the hole for the trees, even though they have added 36 of them to the 11th hole of Augusta National Golf Club for next April's Masters tournament. The three dozen mature pine trees, ranging in height from 25 to 35 feet, have been added to the right side of the fairway at the already difficult 490-yard hole as part of the club's continuing toughening of the course.
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SPORTS
June 4, 2003 | Thomas Bonk
There won't be any commercial breaks at next year's Masters, either. Hootie Johnson, chairman of Augusta National Golf Club, said Tuesday that the 2004 Masters telecast will be commercial free for the second year in a row. The tournament, won by Mike Weir two months ago, attracted 34.5 million viewers and was the third most-watched Masters.
SPORTS
May 24, 2003 | Thomas Bonk
If you have lost track of Martha Burk, the chair of the National Council of Women's Organizations was back at it again Friday, aiming another barb at Augusta National Golf Club. Burk, who is leading a campaign to force the club that is host of the Masters to admit a female member, issued a statement congratulating Annika Sorenstam while criticizing Colonial sponsor Bank of America.
SPORTS
April 14, 2003 | Diane Pucin
Martha Burk didn't get it. Free and fawning media attention did not mean her point resonated. Access to the sporting press did not mean that the people of this town, or the fans of golf, or even a large number of women, feel a pressing need for a woman to join Augusta National Golf Club. She doesn't understand yet how the Masters as a sporting event can't easily be attached to the all-male club where it is played. For nine months Burk has been a media darling.
SPORTS
April 13, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
A protest almost nine months in the making took little more than an hour to play out. Martha Burk and her National Council of Women's Organizations (NCWO) spent more time inflating and deflating a giant pink pig -- "Augusta National Corporate Pigs' Club" was the porker's message -- than it took for four speakers to earn scattered applause for a series of speeches against Augusta National Golf Course and its all-male membership.
SPORTS
April 12, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
The field is muddy, a sunken spot out of sight and sound of Augusta National Golf Club. A city truck spread gravel along the edges so buses would have a place to drop protesters without the sinking of either bus or protesters. Richmond County Sheriff Ronald Strength delivered a stern lecture to representatives of groups who plan to patrol the field today from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. No microphones or speakers, but bullhorns are OK. Handing out leaflets -- fine. Selling souvenirs, not fine.
SPORTS
April 11, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Though barred from the front gates of Augusta National Golf Club, Martha Burk will still protest. "In the pits," she said. And no more debating Chairman Hootie Johnson over the issue of admitting women as members to the club that holds the Masters. It's all about the corporations now, Burk said Thursday at the Martin Luther King Center. It's all about pressure now. It's about holding accountable the chief executives of Fortune 500 companies who belong to the male-only Augusta National.
SPORTS
April 10, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court in Atlanta denied an emergency request by Martha Burk and her National Council of Women's Organizations that she be allowed to conduct a protest Saturday outside the main gate of Augusta National Golf Club. Burk plans to conduct a protest of Augusta National's males-owner membership policy on the third day of the Masters.
SPORTS
April 10, 2003
The traffic outside stretched for miles, past bible stores and chicken joints and rain-soaked hustlers begging for tickets. "We are a private club ... " said Hootie Johnson. The crowd inside numbered thousands, filling the courtyard, wallpapering the fairways, lining up two dozen deep for the men's room. "A group getting together periodically for camaraderie...." There were camera towers in the pine trees and microphones in the azaleas and satellite dishes in the parking lot.
SPORTS
April 10, 2003 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Beneath a dull, gray sky, the 67th Masters begins today at Augusta National Golf Club, in what you would have to call extraordinary circumstances. The weather has been unseasonably cold and damp, but chances are that things are going to heat up around here. Tiger Woods takes off in hot pursuit of his third consecutive Masters championship, something no one -- not Jack Nicklaus, not Arnold Palmer, not Ben Hogan, not Byron Nelson -- has been able to accomplish.
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