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Augusta National Golf Club

SPORTS
April 4, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
"The back nine at Augusta National on Sunday ... " Isn't that line copyrighted? If it's not, it should be. You hear it all the time. " ... that's where the Masters actually starts." That's why there was so much hand-wringing when Masters officials, led by tournament chairman Hootie Johnson, significantly altered five of the holes on the back side in sweeping changes for the 2002 Masters. Standing apart from the hand-wringers, though, was Byron Nelson, the 1937 and 1942 Masters champion.
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SPORTS
April 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
The city of Augusta, Ga., illegally restricted a small protest last year against all-male membership at the home of the Masters, a federal court in Atlanta ruled Thursday. The National Council of Women's Organizations tried to picket outside the private Augusta National Golf Club during the tournament, but local officials cited security concerns and forced about 50 protesters to move half a mile away.
SPORTS
April 5, 2004 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Sure, it's pretty, with all those flowers and stately trees and that gently meandering creek. But appearances are often deceiving at Augusta National Golf Club for the Masters tournament, when the trees start getting in the way of golf balls, the creek claims a few more of them and the greens are so diabolically fast that no one has time to see the flowers anyway.
SPORTS
August 23, 2003 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
You can still see the hole for the trees, even though they have added 36 of them to the 11th hole of Augusta National Golf Club for next April's Masters tournament. The three dozen mature pine trees, ranging in height from 25 to 35 feet, have been added to the right side of the fairway at the already difficult 490-yard hole as part of the club's continuing toughening of the course.
SPORTS
May 24, 2003 | Thomas Bonk
If you have lost track of Martha Burk, the chair of the National Council of Women's Organizations was back at it again Friday, aiming another barb at Augusta National Golf Club. Burk, who is leading a campaign to force the club that is host of the Masters to admit a female member, issued a statement congratulating Annika Sorenstam while criticizing Colonial sponsor Bank of America.
SPORTS
April 14, 2003 | Diane Pucin
Martha Burk didn't get it. Free and fawning media attention did not mean her point resonated. Access to the sporting press did not mean that the people of this town, or the fans of golf, or even a large number of women, feel a pressing need for a woman to join Augusta National Golf Club. She doesn't understand yet how the Masters as a sporting event can't easily be attached to the all-male club where it is played. For nine months Burk has been a media darling.
SPORTS
April 13, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
A protest almost nine months in the making took little more than an hour to play out. Martha Burk and her National Council of Women's Organizations (NCWO) spent more time inflating and deflating a giant pink pig -- "Augusta National Corporate Pigs' Club" was the porker's message -- than it took for four speakers to earn scattered applause for a series of speeches against Augusta National Golf Course and its all-male membership.
SPORTS
April 12, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
The field is muddy, a sunken spot out of sight and sound of Augusta National Golf Club. A city truck spread gravel along the edges so buses would have a place to drop protesters without the sinking of either bus or protesters. Richmond County Sheriff Ronald Strength delivered a stern lecture to representatives of groups who plan to patrol the field today from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. No microphones or speakers, but bullhorns are OK. Handing out leaflets -- fine. Selling souvenirs, not fine.
SPORTS
April 11, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Though barred from the front gates of Augusta National Golf Club, Martha Burk will still protest. "In the pits," she said. And no more debating Chairman Hootie Johnson over the issue of admitting women as members to the club that holds the Masters. It's all about the corporations now, Burk said Thursday at the Martin Luther King Center. It's all about pressure now. It's about holding accountable the chief executives of Fortune 500 companies who belong to the male-only Augusta National.
SPORTS
April 10, 2003 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court in Atlanta denied an emergency request by Martha Burk and her National Council of Women's Organizations that she be allowed to conduct a protest Saturday outside the main gate of Augusta National Golf Club. Burk plans to conduct a protest of Augusta National's males-owner membership policy on the third day of the Masters.
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