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Austan Goolsbee

NATIONAL
January 18, 2009 | Jonah Goldberg
Presidential inaugurations are in many ways the high-water marks of any presidency because they're so full of hope. All things seem possible. The rivalries and backbiting haven't set in yet, at least not publicly. Even the inevitable disappointments over Cabinet picks and White House staffing are tempered by the wide-eyed dreams of an ambitious agenda. Everyone -- or at least everyone who backed the guy -- has that "we can make this the best yearbook ever!" feeling. Then comes the letdown.
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NEWS
November 13, 2007 | JONAH GOLDBERG
'The question is: Should we be giving an extra $120 billion to people in the top 1%?" So asked Gene Sperling, Hillary Clinton's chief economic advisor, at a recent National Press Club panel discussion. Translation: It's the government's money, and anything left over after Uncle Sam picks your pockets is a "gift."
BUSINESS
July 30, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
The economic recovery faltered dramatically in the first half of the year, and that means more trouble ahead. The latest Commerce Department figures show that the nation's economic output was gasping for breath long before the debilitating debt-ceiling debate took center stage, further dimming prospects for 14 million unemployed Americans. The nation's total economic output grew at an anemic annual rate of 1.3% from April through June, below already weak expectations. And the government sharply scaled back its estimate of first-quarter growth to a feeble 0.4%, the lowest figure since the recession technically ended two years ago. "These are disastrous numbers for the economy," said Bernard Baumohl, chief global economist at the Economic Outlook Group.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Tribune Washington Bureau
Signaling a potential deal on tax cuts, House Republican leader John A. Boehner said Sunday he'd be willing to preserve Bush-era rates for the middle class while letting them expire for the wealthy. The Obama administration wants to make the tax cuts permanent for families earning less than $250,000 a year and individuals earning less than $200,000. Republicans, and some Democrats, advocate keeping all the tax cuts, which will expire at the end of December unless Congress acts. That would preserve lower rates for all but about 3% of Americans.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
The guessing game about who will replace Lawrence Summers as President Obama's top economic advisor is ramping up. With Wall Street and Washington fond of speculation, the names of two high-powered Southern Californians surfaced Tuesday to add to a growing list of possible successors for Summers as director of the National Economic Council. The latest buzz was that Obama would tap one of two big names from Newport Beach mutual fund giant Pacific Investment Management Co.: widely regarded fund manager Bill Gross or Chief Executive Mohamed El-Erian.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
As President Obama remakes his senior staff, he is also shaping a new approach for the second half of his term: to advance his agenda through executive actions he can take on his own, rather than pushing plans through an increasingly hostile Congress. A flurry of staff departures and promotions is playing out as the White House ends a nearly two-year period of intense legislative activity. Where the original staff was built to give Obama maximum clout in Congress, the new White House team won't need the same leverage with lawmakers.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Ed Lorenzen
In his March 22 blog post criticizing proposals to switch from the consumer price index to "chained CPI" to determine cost-of-living adjustments for Social Security beneficiaries and other items in the federal budget, Michael Hiltzik claimed that there were "no grounds" for the statement made in a recent paper from the Moment of Truth Project (" Measuring Up, The Case for Chained CPI" ) that the chained CPI provides a more accurate measure of inflation than the measure currently used.  In fact, experts across the ideological spectrum agree that the chained CPI is indeed more accurate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes   Click here to download TV listings for the week of Feb. 23 - March 1, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES Undercover Boss Greg Miller, CEO of the Utah Jazz, samples a variety of lower-level jobs within the organization and learns he has a lot to learn, in this new episode. 8 p.m. CBS Dateline NBC This new episode previews the upcoming murder trial of Olympic athlete Oscar "Blade Runner" Pistorius.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
In the West Wing it had become a pretty common sight: two national security aides with close ties to the president, Thomas Donilon and Denis McDonough, hurrying into the Oval Office to show him the latest piece of hot intelligence. Some administration officials who watched the scene unfold worried that James L. Jones, the national security advisor at the time, was being left out of the loop and that Obama was being given raw reports before their meaning and import were clear. A strong national security advisor might weed out what the president doesn't need to see. Yet Obama never quite clicked with Jones ?
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