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NEWS
April 12, 1996 | Reuters
Terminally ill Australians have begun traveling thousands of miles to an outback territory to end their lives under what is believed to be the world's first law that permits assisted suicide, a euthanasia group said Thursday. Up to 10 people are waiting for the controversial law to take effect July 1, a spokesman for the Northern Territory's Voluntary Euthanasia Network said. Most of those seeking euthanasia are elderly people with cancer, he added.
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NEWS
August 27, 1997 | JEFF BRAZIL and STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They love to adopt American styles here, from fast food to funky fashions, but there's one thing they want no part of: our off-the-charts gun violence. That's why dairy farmer Paul Arundell, standing in line at his neighborhood's Firearms Collection Centre, is doing something very un-American: surrendering his assault rifle to be destroyed. In return, he will pocket a government check for $400--more than twice the weapon's cost. And worth every nickel, Australian leaders say.
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NEWS
September 26, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
An Australian man with prostate cancer has become the first person to die under the world's first law permitting voluntary euthanasia, said Dr. Philip Nitschke, who assisted the man with a lethal dose of barbiturates at the patient's home in Darwin, capital of the Northern Territory region. The patient had terminal cancer and had been ill for a number of years, the doctor said.
NEWS
September 26, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
An Australian man with prostate cancer has become the first person to die under the world's first law permitting voluntary euthanasia, said Dr. Philip Nitschke, who assisted the man with a lethal dose of barbiturates at the patient's home in Darwin, capital of the Northern Territory region. The patient had terminal cancer and had been ill for a number of years, the doctor said.
NEWS
December 4, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Two frozen embryos left behind by a wealthy Los Angeles couple who died in a 1983 plane crash will be offered to other childless couples in Australia, the minister of health for the Australian state of Victoria has finally decided. But that decision may be moot, according to U.S. fertility experts. Even in the best of cases now, only about one in 20 frozen embryos yields a live birth, according to Geoffrey Sher of the Pacific Fertility Center in San Francisco and other experts.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Christmas Day, 1991, Nick Toonen, a 29-year-old homosexual who lives on Australia's remote island of Tasmania, filed an unusual complaint with the United Nations. Toonen wrote to the U.N. Human Rights Commission in Geneva that Tasmania's 80-year-old laws banning "intercourse against nature" constituted a threat to his life and liberty, violated his privacy and led to constant vilification and threats of physical violence.
NEWS
February 16, 1991
The success of the anti-Scud Patriot missiles in the Mideast is prompting replication of sorts at home. A Colorado toy rocket manufacturer reports it is backlogged with orders for an upcoming 21-inch WORKING MODEL of the Patriot missile. Meanwhile, in Australia, officials warned that toy Patriot missiles could endanger aircraft.
NEWS
July 31, 1993 | Christian Science Monitor
It can't be easy to eat your national symbol. But Australians are overcoming their qualms about it. Soon they'll all be throwing "Skippy" on the barby, instead of shrimp. New South Wales became the fourth state to legalize the selling of kangaroo meat in supermarkets on July 22. It took three attempts in six years to get legislation through state Parliament. Australians generally regard the native high-hopping marsupial with affection.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | Reuters
This country is introducing tough new immigration laws today that will raise educational and professional requirements and deal harshly with people who overstay their visas. The laws "substantially tightens our management of the immigration program," Immigration Minister Robert Ray said Monday. The rate of emigration to Australia has been rising steadily over the last few years. The number in 1989-90 will be limited to 140,000, the same as in the previous year.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | Reuters
Terminally ill Australians have begun traveling thousands of miles to an outback territory to end their lives under what is believed to be the world's first law that permits assisted suicide, a euthanasia group said Thursday. Up to 10 people are waiting for the controversial law to take effect July 1, a spokesman for the Northern Territory's Voluntary Euthanasia Network said. Most of those seeking euthanasia are elderly people with cancer, he added.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Christmas Day, 1991, Nick Toonen, a 29-year-old homosexual who lives on Australia's remote island of Tasmania, filed an unusual complaint with the United Nations. Toonen wrote to the U.N. Human Rights Commission in Geneva that Tasmania's 80-year-old laws banning "intercourse against nature" constituted a threat to his life and liberty, violated his privacy and led to constant vilification and threats of physical violence.
NEWS
July 31, 1993 | Christian Science Monitor
It can't be easy to eat your national symbol. But Australians are overcoming their qualms about it. Soon they'll all be throwing "Skippy" on the barby, instead of shrimp. New South Wales became the fourth state to legalize the selling of kangaroo meat in supermarkets on July 22. It took three attempts in six years to get legislation through state Parliament. Australians generally regard the native high-hopping marsupial with affection.
NEWS
February 16, 1991
The success of the anti-Scud Patriot missiles in the Mideast is prompting replication of sorts at home. A Colorado toy rocket manufacturer reports it is backlogged with orders for an upcoming 21-inch WORKING MODEL of the Patriot missile. Meanwhile, in Australia, officials warned that toy Patriot missiles could endanger aircraft.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | ELLEN UZELAC, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Licking toads will not give you warts or produce a fairy prince, but it might get you high. It isn't exactly an epidemic, but the Drug Enforcement Administration says toad licking is the latest way to hallucinate. "It sounds like a fairy tale gone wrong, doesn't it?" said Robert K. Sager, chief of the DEA's laboratory in San Francisco. "Now, I don't think this is going to be a great problem because people don't go around licking toads as a habit." The culprit: the Cane toad.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | Reuters
This country is introducing tough new immigration laws today that will raise educational and professional requirements and deal harshly with people who overstay their visas. The laws "substantially tightens our management of the immigration program," Immigration Minister Robert Ray said Monday. The rate of emigration to Australia has been rising steadily over the last few years. The number in 1989-90 will be limited to 140,000, the same as in the previous year.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | ELLEN UZELAC, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Licking toads will not give you warts or produce a fairy prince, but it might get you high. It isn't exactly an epidemic, but the Drug Enforcement Administration says toad licking is the latest way to hallucinate. "It sounds like a fairy tale gone wrong, doesn't it?" said Robert K. Sager, chief of the DEA's laboratory in San Francisco. "Now, I don't think this is going to be a great problem because people don't go around licking toads as a habit." The culprit: the Cane toad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Residents of New South Wales, Australia's most populous state, surrendered 600 guns Friday in compliance with laws passed after two mass murders last year. Gun owners in the state have until Jan. 29 to hand over their weapons. After that, they face a $700 fine. Only farmers and licensed members of shooting clubs may keep guns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Residents of New South Wales, Australia's most populous state, surrendered 600 guns Friday in compliance with laws passed after two mass murders last year. Gun owners in the state have until Jan. 29 to hand over their weapons. After that, they face a $700 fine. Only farmers and licensed members of shooting clubs may keep guns.
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